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Articles 1 - 30 of 48

Full-Text Articles in Race, Ethnicity and Post-Colonial Studies

Beasts Of The Southern Wild And Indigenous Communities In The Age Of The Sixth Extinction, Brianna R. Burke Jan 2019

Beasts Of The Southern Wild And Indigenous Communities In The Age Of The Sixth Extinction, Brianna R. Burke

English Publications

Island Road in Louisiana seems to lead to nowhere. An hour and forty minutes southwest of New Orleans, deep in the bayou, Island Road was built on marshlands in 1953, but in the sixty years since, those have melted into the sea. Now hemmed in by water on both sides, for portions of the year Island Road is flooded and impassable, and it dead- ends into the Gulf of Mexico; not much to see and no reason to go out there, or so some folks might think. In fact, many think it is “irresponsible” to live in such a place ...


History Of Agriculture In The United States, Pamela Riney-Kehrberg Aug 2018

History Of Agriculture In The United States, Pamela Riney-Kehrberg

History Publications

Agriculture is at the very center of the human enterprise; its trappings are in evidence all around, yet the agricultural past is an exceptionally distant place from modern America. While the majority of Americans once raised a significant portion of their own food, that ceased to be the case at the beginning of the 20th century. Only a very small portion of the American population today has a personal connection to agriculture. People still must eat, but the process by which food arrives on their plates is less evident than ever. The evolution of that process, with all of its ...


Who Gets In? The Price Of Acceptance In Canada, Chavon A. Niles Mar 2018

Who Gets In? The Price Of Acceptance In Canada, Chavon A. Niles

Journal of Critical Thought and Praxis

The Canadian nation state is often applauded for its open and welcoming attitude towards Others. The Prime Minister of Canada has openly stated that “Diversity is our strength.” However, who gets in suggests who and what Canada values. Through the stories of Jazmine, Nico and Harold shared by Global News, I will illustrate how Canada continues to discriminate against people with disabilities. Using critical disability studies and critical race theory, I explore the assumptions the “excessive demand,” point system, and medical exam make in labelling and disregarding disabled applicants who are read as undesirable and unworthy. Finally, I reflect on ...


Cheyenne Odyssey: Representing Removal In An Educational Video Game, Christina Gish Hill Jan 2018

Cheyenne Odyssey: Representing Removal In An Educational Video Game, Christina Gish Hill

World Languages and Cultures Publications

This articles reflects on the process of creating digital media in collaboration with Native communities, using the example of Cheyenne Odyssey, a game from Mission US, to argue that such media can illuminate the perspectives of Indigenous peoples for a wide audience while also creating digital repositories for both visual and narrative forms of knowledge. This game takes on the difficult challenge of portraying very sensitive moments of US history to middle school-age children. The game walks the player through the Battle of Little Big Horn, the forced removal of the Northern Cheyenne people, their harrowing journey home again, and ...


Blackademic Negotiations When The Ivory Tower Isn't Enough: Finding Pathways To Activism As An Emerging Black Scholar, Wideline Seraphin Apr 2017

Blackademic Negotiations When The Ivory Tower Isn't Enough: Finding Pathways To Activism As An Emerging Black Scholar, Wideline Seraphin

Journal of Critical Thought and Praxis

This reflexive essay chronicles the last two years of the author's PhD program and the negotiations of an emerging black female critical scholar in response to the growing tensions between academic obligations and growing racial unrest. Guiding questions of, “what are you going to do? And what are you willing to pay?” were used to think through what it meant to dedicate oneself to critical social justice work and apply that dedication to everyday practices despite perceived limitations.


United States Of America, Sebastian Braun Jan 2017

United States Of America, Sebastian Braun

World Languages and Cultures Publications

Approximately 6.6 million people in the U.S., or 2% of the total population, identify as Native American or Alaska Native, either alone or in combination with another ethnic identity. Around 2.5 million, or 0.8% of the population, identify as American Indian or Alaska Native alone. 567 tribal entities were federally recognized in May 2016, and most of these have recognized national homelands. 23% of the Native population lives in American Indian areas or Alaska Native villages. The state with the largest Native population is California; the place with the largest Native population is New York City ...


Cities Of Sub-Saharan Africa, Garth Myers, Francis Owusu, Angela G. Subulwa Mar 2016

Cities Of Sub-Saharan Africa, Garth Myers, Francis Owusu, Angela G. Subulwa

Community and Regional Planning Publications

SSA's interlocking urban environmental problems are magnified by shortcomings in management and oversight by both governments and the private sector. Patrick lives in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, where he works as a chef at a Chinese restaurant. Patrick is a mixed-race South African, born in Cape Town. He worked for many years as a cook on oil tankers, where many of the crew members were Bangladeshi, Filipino, or Tanzanian, the latter often from the Zanzibar islands or from Dar es Salaam.


Usa, Sebastian Braun Jan 2016

Usa, Sebastian Braun

World Languages and Cultures Publications

Approximately 5.1 million people in the U.S., or 1.7% of the total population, identify as Native American or Alaska Native alone or in combination with another ethnic identity. Around 2.5 million, or 0.8% of the population, identify as American Indian or Alaska Native only.1 Five hundred and sixty-six tribal entities were federally-recognized at the beginning of 2015,2 and most of these have recognized national homelands. Twenty-three per cent of the Native population live in American Indian areas or Alaska Native villages. The state with the largest Native population is California; the place with ...


Hair And Beauty Choices Of African American Women During The Civil Rights Movement, 1960-1974, Ashley R. Garrin Jan 2016

Hair And Beauty Choices Of African American Women During The Civil Rights Movement, 1960-1974, Ashley R. Garrin

Graduate Theses and Dissertations

This research examined the Civil Rights Movement, specifically focusing on hair and beauty choices of African American women who were emerging adults (ages 18-25), between the years 1960-1974, which bridges both the classical period of the Civil Rights Movement and that of Black Power politics (Wilson, 2013). The specific time period corresponds with the adoption of African American hairstyles that were more Afrocentric, following the social climate of Black Pride (Walker, 2007). To achieve understanding of African American women's perspectives, seven participants were interviewed using Seidman's (2013) protocol for which a three-part, in-depth interview series was conducted. The ...


Book Review: Encounter On The Great Plains: Scandinavian Settlers And The Dispossession Of Dakota Indians, 1890-1930 By Karen V. Hansen, Sebastian Braun Jan 2016

Book Review: Encounter On The Great Plains: Scandinavian Settlers And The Dispossession Of Dakota Indians, 1890-1930 By Karen V. Hansen, Sebastian Braun

World Languages and Cultures Publications

In Encounter on the Great Plains, Karen Hansen investigates Scandinavian immigrants and settlers who came to live on the post-allotment Spirit Lake Reservation in North Dakota. She does so through examining stories by Scandinavian as well as Dakota residents. As the subtitle indicates, Hansen is interested in the question of dispossession: Did the Scandinavians, among whom were her ancestors, contribute to the dispossession of the Dakotas? As she writes, “[w]hat does it mean when one group’s acquisition of land is predicated on the dispossession of the other?” (3). Her answer is multifaceted and reveals the complexities of lives ...


Educating The Enemy: Chinese Students And The Sino-American Cold War, 1948-1955, Nick Waldrop Jan 2016

Educating The Enemy: Chinese Students And The Sino-American Cold War, 1948-1955, Nick Waldrop

Graduate Theses and Dissertations

In response to the People’s Republic of China’s intervention in the Korean War, the United States terminated education exchange programs and detained scientifically and technically trained Chinese students and intellectuals living in America. This response was partly an exigency of the war but was also reflective of the broader Sino-American Cold War. Utilizing archival material from the Truman and Eisenhower Presidential Archives, as well as published government documents, this paper traces the shifting patterns of American thought regarding education exchange and the utility of Chinese intellectuals and argues that the American government politicized Chinese students as early as ...


Pictures, Not Merely Photographs: Authenticity, Performance And The Hopi In Edward S. Curtis's The North American Indian, Heather Lin Skeens Jan 2016

Pictures, Not Merely Photographs: Authenticity, Performance And The Hopi In Edward S. Curtis's The North American Indian, Heather Lin Skeens

Graduate Theses and Dissertations

In the early years of the twentieth century, American photographer Edward S. Curtis (1868-1952) set out to complete an ambitious project documenting traditional American Indian life and customs still practiced among tribes living west of the Mississippi River. Strong influences emanating from Curtis’s involvement in pictorial fine art and commercial photography, as well as the developing field of American anthropology and early ethnographic writing, tempered his early work. Curtis was exposed to the developing notion of the “vanishing race” of indigenous peoples, and he joined in the overwhelming response by American ethnographers and anthropologists to salvage any cultural information ...


Still In The Fight: The Struggle For Community In The Upper Midwest For African American Civil War Veterans, Dwain Conrad Coleman Jan 2016

Still In The Fight: The Struggle For Community In The Upper Midwest For African American Civil War Veterans, Dwain Conrad Coleman

Graduate Theses and Dissertations

The Civil War and Emancipation had a transformative effect on the nation as a whole but an even greater effect on the lives of African Americans. While historians have examined the effects of the Civil War and Emancipation on African Americans in the South in detail, few have explored the effects of such events on African Americans in the Upper Midwest.

Also lacking in this historiography is how the military service of African Americans affected the lives of these veterans and the communities in the Upper Midwest they helped to form after the Civil War. Using the black community of ...


Will The Real Mariah Watkins Please Stand Up?: A Case Of Inaccuracy And Marginalization Of African American History And Appearance, Jennifer Farley Gordon, Eulanda A. Sanders Nov 2015

Will The Real Mariah Watkins Please Stand Up?: A Case Of Inaccuracy And Marginalization Of African American History And Appearance, Jennifer Farley Gordon, Eulanda A. Sanders

International Textile and Apparel Association (ITAA) Annual Conference Proceedings

Who was Mariah Watkins? What was her identity, and how did appearance inform that identity? Watkins was an African American woman. Although likely born a slave, she lived most of her free years as a woman of property and of skill, working as a documented nurse and midwife in Neosho, Missouri. This paper relies on archival records, photographic analysis, and material culture to explore Watkins as a case study in the challenges of documenting African American appearance during and after the antebellum period in the United States.


The Role Of Soul: Stax Records And The Civil Rights Movement In Memphis, Tennessee, Jason Danielson Jan 2015

The Role Of Soul: Stax Records And The Civil Rights Movement In Memphis, Tennessee, Jason Danielson

Graduate Theses and Dissertations

Scholarship of the civil rights movement developed academically constructed categories, creating binary understandings of the movement that did not capture the true nuance and complexity of specific circumstances. Music offers a lens through which to view the movement holistically, breaking down the essentialist binary interpretations through postmodern analysis of lyrics and music in its historical context. This work applies that approach to the music of Stax Records in the context of the civil rights movement in Memphis, Tennessee.

Much of the scholarship of the civil rights movement tended to establish four essentialist understandings, a method binary of integrationism versus nationalism ...


An Iowa Anomaly: Robert Ray And The Indochinese Refugees, Matthew Ryan Walsh Jan 2015

An Iowa Anomaly: Robert Ray And The Indochinese Refugees, Matthew Ryan Walsh

Graduate Theses and Dissertations

This dissertation examines the formation and maturation of the state of Iowa’s refugee resettlement program (1975-2010) during the governorship of Robert D. Ray. Though other Indochinese communities are studied, particular attention is devoted to the Tai Dam because the state resettled them as a cluster. Reasons for starting the program, the legacy of the Vietnam War, and Iowans’ varied responses to refugee intake are detailed. It will be proven that Robert Ray wielded more influence over Indochinese refugee resettlement and relief than any other governor. He established his own resettlement agency, admitted 1,500 boat people, influenced the passage ...


George Washington Carver: Textile Artist, Eulanda A. Sanders, Chanmi Hwang Sep 2014

George Washington Carver: Textile Artist, Eulanda A. Sanders, Chanmi Hwang

Apparel, Events and Hospitality Management Conference Proceedings and Presentations

Born a slave, George Washington Carver (1864-1943) is one of the most historically prominent African American scientists. Carver was a pioneer as an agriculturalist and botanist by introducing methods of soil conservation for farmers, inventing hundreds of by-products from peanuts, pecans, sweet potatoes, and soybeans, and practicing “zero waste” sustainability. Scholars have recognized Carver’s talent as a painter and his ability to develop paints and dyes from various natural sources; however, there is very little scholarship documenting his work as a textile artist. Holdings at the G.W. Carver National Monument and Tuskegee Institute National Historic indicate that Carver ...


American National Identification: Does It Predict Prejudice?, Alexandra Goldina, Clara Lager, Brittany Berrier, Xiaoyun Zhang Apr 2014

American National Identification: Does It Predict Prejudice?, Alexandra Goldina, Clara Lager, Brittany Berrier, Xiaoyun Zhang

Symposium on Undergraduate Research and Creative Expression

There has been growing evidence that ingroup identification is multidimensional (Leidner et. al. 2010). Higher overall ingroup identification has been shown to lead to stronger intergroup bias (e.g., Aberson et al., 2000). On the other hand, past research indicates that ingroup identification does not necessarily lead to outgroup hate (Brewer, 1999). The goal of this study was to explore how different types of American identification relate to attitudes towards Muslims. A correlational study was conducted in a sample of 716 American students (average age 20 years, 47% male). Participants completed several measures of national identification and explicit prejudice towards ...


Beyond The Straight State: On The Borderlands Of Sexuality, Ethnicity, And Nation In The United States And Europe, Kevin S. Amidon Jun 2013

Beyond The Straight State: On The Borderlands Of Sexuality, Ethnicity, And Nation In The United States And Europe, Kevin S. Amidon

World Languages and Cultures Publications

Borderlands-limned, delimited, and defined by the presence, imaginary presence, or absence of geospatial boundaries contingent upon state power have many representations. Positive and negative state sanction through rights, privileges, policing, or enforcement are often determined by a person's position with respect to such boundaries. Sometimes such boundaries, like the borders of nation-states that generally define citizenship, seem to have taken on nearly immutable fixity. The historical processes through which institutional structures accredited to these questions of space and sanction began to take their modem shape in the eighteenth century. Often, however, borderlands are more imagined than physical, more contingent ...


On The Discursive Construction Of Jewish “Racialization” And “Race Passing:” Jews As “U-Boats” With A Mysterious “Queer Light”, Warren J. Blumenfeld Oct 2012

On The Discursive Construction Of Jewish “Racialization” And “Race Passing:” Jews As “U-Boats” With A Mysterious “Queer Light”, Warren J. Blumenfeld

Journal of Critical Thought and Praxis

The Nazi Gestapo referred to Jews in hiding as “U-Boats” to survive under the Third Reich. Like the seagoing vessels, they traveled a fluid sea. Some navigated below the depths, while others floated on the surface in plain view, artfully (and not so artfully) disguised to conceal their actual identities. The article profiles the author’s family, the Mahlers of Antwerp, Belgium, during the Nazi occupation through an investigation of the historical, theoretical, and discursive categories of “race” and “race passing,” specifically as it relates to European-heritage Jewish people.


Arts And Crafts In Camp, Jane E. Dusselier Jan 2012

Arts And Crafts In Camp, Jane E. Dusselier

Anthropology Publications

As a result of Executive Order 9066 signed on 19 February 1942, by President Franklin D. Roosevelt, more than 120,000 persons of Japanese ancestry living in the U.S. were forced from their homes and imprisoned in concentration camps. Stripped of their civil and political rights and confined in harsh landscapes, these new prisoners of the U.S. government quickly began creating art, broadly defined, that aided their efforts in re-territorializing the camps. Through this process of re-territorialization, imprisoned Japanese Americans altered shoddily built, crowded, and barren inside living areas into spaces of survival.


Health Care, Hector Avalos Jan 2009

Health Care, Hector Avalos

Philosophy and Religious Studies Publications

The role of religion in health care among people who became known as Latina/as can be traced back to first encounters between the Spaniards and indigenous peoples in the Americas. Some of the Spanish chroniclers were interested in discovering new medicines, and so they collected as much information as possible about health practices. In general, health care and medicine were intertwined with an imperialistic study of subject peoples. This entry treats health care as a result of the triadic interactions of European, indigenous, and African traditions that are still being experienced among the pan-ethnic group we call Latina/as ...


Juntos: Vivieron, Trabajaron Y Aprendieron (Together: They Lived, Worked And Learned); The History Of Latinos In Valley Junction, Iowa, Andrea Kay Tucker Jan 2008

Juntos: Vivieron, Trabajaron Y Aprendieron (Together: They Lived, Worked And Learned); The History Of Latinos In Valley Junction, Iowa, Andrea Kay Tucker

Retrospective Theses and Dissertations

Prediction of colloidal nanoparticle aggregation is an important problem which needs to be solved in an accurate and efficient manner. In ideal case model which is chosen to predict colloidal nanoparticle aggregation should accurately describe physico-chemical interactions of relatively large physical systems, and at the same time, simulate at low computational cost. In this research, two simulation approaches, molecular dynamics (MD) and Brownian dynamics (BD), are analyzed and compared with a view to accurately predicting ggregation of colloidal nanoparticles. Because the BD technique is essentially a reduction of the MD method the accuracy requirements for BD simulations have been established ...


Ho-Chunk Powwows: Innovation And Tradition In A Changing World, Grant Arndt Jan 2008

Ho-Chunk Powwows: Innovation And Tradition In A Changing World, Grant Arndt

World Languages and Cultures Publications

One hundred years ago members of the Ho-Chunk Nation held their fifth annual homecoming powwow on the homestead of John Blackhawk, just outside of Black River Falls, Wisconsin. The Black River Falls Badger State Banner reported that the event "consisted of a series of dances, pony races, ball games, [and] foot races" and attracted three hundred HoChunk and other American Indian participants from around the state, as well as "the interest of many of our citizens, who drove out at intervals to witness the festivities." In a large, circular dance arbor roofed with freshly cut pine branches specially constructed for ...


Carrie Chapman Catt And The Evolutionary Politics Of Sex And Race, 1885-1940., Kevin S. Amidon Apr 2007

Carrie Chapman Catt And The Evolutionary Politics Of Sex And Race, 1885-1940., Kevin S. Amidon

World Languages and Cultures Publications

On 12 December 1917, Carrie Chapman Catt, a long-time leader of the worldwide woman suffrage movement, wrote to Henry Fairfield Osborn, director of the American Museum of Natural History in New York. Catt inquired whether Osborn would sign a petition in support of the pending suffrage amendment which was intended to include the signatures of "1000 men whose names we have chosen on account of quality and influence."' Given Osborn's standing in academic, scientific, and political circles, he was a likely enough figure for Catt to turn to in her strategy of developing and publicizing elite support for the ...


Immigrant Identities In The Rural Midwest, 1830-1925, Knut Oyangen Jan 2007

Immigrant Identities In The Rural Midwest, 1830-1925, Knut Oyangen

Retrospective Theses and Dissertations

This dissertation is about the dislocation and estrangement of transatlantic migrants to the rural Midwest, and the ways in which they both resisted and participated in their own sociocultural displacement by formulating new identities in unfamiliar contexts.


Residential Stability, Social Capital And Parenting Quality Among African-American Mothers , Gail Wallace Jan 2006

Residential Stability, Social Capital And Parenting Quality Among African-American Mothers , Gail Wallace

Retrospective Theses and Dissertations

This study examines neighborhood characteristics as predictors of parenting quality among African-American mothers. Drawing upon Wilson's (1996) ideas of how community conditions affect the urban poor, I examined protective qualities of community life including residential stability and social capital. I examined social capital in two separate social fields based on Wilkinson's (1970) field theory approach to community development. These two separate fields, community and organizational social capital were tested as predictors of African-American mothers' psychological well-being and parenting quality;Among the 759 African-American mothers who participated in this study, high residential stability significantly predicted community social capital but ...


Rising To The Top: The Personal And Professional Journeys Of Four Hispanic Women Leaders In Higher Education , Lyvier Leffler Aschenbrenner Jan 2006

Rising To The Top: The Personal And Professional Journeys Of Four Hispanic Women Leaders In Higher Education , Lyvier Leffler Aschenbrenner

Retrospective Theses and Dissertations

The primary purpose of this study was to determine, through interviews, what educational and socio-cultural characteristics Hispanic women leaders in higher education possess. This study also provides an outlet for four Hispanic women leaders to share their unique experiences and journeys during their rise to administration. They were able to share their perceptions of their own career paths. The results offer advice for other Hispanic women aspiring to ascend into leadership positions. The in-depth descriptions of their personal experiences provides an opportunity to gain a better understanding of the types of barriers associated with access to higher educational leadership positions ...


Leadership Experiences Of African American Women Who Are Mid-Level Student Affairs Administrators , Hannah Louise Clayborne Jan 2006

Leadership Experiences Of African American Women Who Are Mid-Level Student Affairs Administrators , Hannah Louise Clayborne

Retrospective Theses and Dissertations

For too long the universal leadership map for those interested in learning about leadership has drawn from the leadership values and beliefs of individuals whose life experiences do not fully represent the demographical changes that have occurred within the larger community (Parker, 2005). Consequently, African American women with intentions of using extant literature on leadership as a means or directional tool to gaining higher levels of personal and professional understanding of their own leadership approaches, inevitably confront a discourse shaped by the perceptions and experiences of White men and White women (Parker, 2005). To this end, exploration of leadership issues ...


Artful Identifications: Crafting Survival In Japanese American Concentration Camps, Jane E. Dusselier Jan 2005

Artful Identifications: Crafting Survival In Japanese American Concentration Camps, Jane E. Dusselier

Jane E. Dusselier

"Artful Identifications" offers three meanings of internment art. First, internees remade locations of imprisonment into livable places of survival. Inside places were remade as internees responded to degraded living conditions by creating furniture with discarded apple crates, cardboard, tree branches and stumps, scrap pieces of wood left behind by government carpenters, and wood lifted from guarded lumber piles. Having addressed the material conditions of their living units, internees turned their attention to aesthetic matters by creating needle crafts, wood carvings, ikebana, paintings, shell art, and kobu. Dramatic changes to outside spaces of "assembly centers" and concentration camps were also critical ...