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Full-Text Articles in Race, Ethnicity and Post-Colonial Studies

"A House On Fire": Xicanisma And Domesticity In Sandra Cisneros's Major Works, Melissa West Jan 2019

"A House On Fire": Xicanisma And Domesticity In Sandra Cisneros's Major Works, Melissa West

Undergraduate Honors Theses

By applying material Xicanista theory to analyze domesticity in Sandra Cisneros’s inventive literature this thesis recognizes the domestic sphere as a site ripe for potential reconfigurations and transformations. This thesis examines Cisneros’s presentations of domesticity within her major works to argue that she is committed to representing the heterogeneity of Xicana experiences and that her work is grounded in historical and material reality. Her examination of Xicana domesticity allows for engagement with larger sociopolitical considerations that recognize the differences in experiences for Xicanas from Anglos. Her feminist critique of domesticity elevates class and race as considerations in addition ...


Exploring Gloria Anzaldúa’S Methodology In Borderlands/La Frontera—The New Mestiza, Jorge Capetillo-Ponce Jun 2015

Exploring Gloria Anzaldúa’S Methodology In Borderlands/La Frontera—The New Mestiza, Jorge Capetillo-Ponce

Jorge Capetillo-Ponce

Gloria Anzaldúa's Borderlands/La Frontera--The New Mestiza does not fit into the usual critical categories simply because she follows inclination of interest, as opposed to working at achieving systematization. Not only does she shift continually from analysis to meditation, and refuse to recognize disciplinary barriers, but she speaks poetically even when dealing with cultural, political, and social issues. Indeed her method, like Simmel's, is more akin to "style" in art than it is to "analysis" or "inquiry" in the social sciences. A critic proclaims her/his own incompetence, however, if the mere fact that a text has a ...


Framing Identity: Repudiating The Ideal In Chicana Literature, Michael A. Flores Aug 2014

Framing Identity: Repudiating The Ideal In Chicana Literature, Michael A. Flores

All NMU Master's Theses

In the 1960s Rodolfo “Corky” Gonzalez penned his now canonical, epic poem “I Am Joaquin.” The poem chronicles the historic oppression of a transnational, Mexican people as well as revolutionary acts of their forefathers in resisting tyranny. Coinciding with a series of renewed, sociopolitical campaigns, collectively known as the Chicano Movement, Gonzales’ poem uses vivid imagery to present an idealized representation of Chicanos and encouraged his reader to engage in revolutionary action. Though the poem encourages strong leadership, upward mobility, and political engagement the representations of women in his text are misogynistic and limiting.

His presentation of the “black-shawled Faithful ...


Who We Are: Incarcerated Students And The New Prison Literature, 1995-2010, Reilly Hannah N. Lorastein May 2013

Who We Are: Incarcerated Students And The New Prison Literature, 1995-2010, Reilly Hannah N. Lorastein

Honors Projects

This project focuses on American prison writings from the late 1990s to the 2000s. Much has been written about American prison intellectuals such as Malcolm X, George Jackson, Eldridge Cleaver, and Angela Davis, who wrote as active participants in black and brown freedom movements in the United States. However the new prison literature that has emerged over the past two decades through higher education programs within prisons has received little to no attention. This study provides a more nuanced view of the steadily growing silent population in the United States through close readings of Openline, an inter-disciplinary journal featuring poetry ...


“Nobody’S Mother And Nobody’S Wife”: Reconstructing Archetypes And Sexuality In Sandra Cisneros’ “Never Marry A Mexican”, Laura Paz Sep 2008

“Nobody’S Mother And Nobody’S Wife”: Reconstructing Archetypes And Sexuality In Sandra Cisneros’ “Never Marry A Mexican”, Laura Paz

Human Architecture: Journal of the Sociology of Self-Knowledge

Female archetypes of both mythical and historical figures are central to Mexican culture in that they not only reflect this society's ideals and history, but also serve to classify and socialize women. Traditional Mexican society is characterized by rigid gender roles in which women are expected to be faithful wives who are subservient to their husbands, as well as take care of the children and home. Men, on the other hand, can be promiscuous and enjoy sexual relations outside the marriage. For this reason, archetypes exist that function to categorize women as either the "good mother" represented by La ...


Exploring Gloria Anzaldúa’S Methodology In Borderlands/La Frontera—The New Mestiza, Jorge Capetillo-Ponce Jun 2006

Exploring Gloria Anzaldúa’S Methodology In Borderlands/La Frontera—The New Mestiza, Jorge Capetillo-Ponce

Human Architecture: Journal of the Sociology of Self-Knowledge

Gloria Anzaldúa's Borderlands/La Frontera--The New Mestiza does not fit into the usual critical categories simply because she follows inclination of interest, as opposed to working at achieving systematization. Not only does she shift continually from analysis to meditation, and refuse to recognize disciplinary barriers, but she speaks poetically even when dealing with cultural, political, and social issues. Indeed her method, like Simmel's, is more akin to "style" in art than it is to "analysis" or "inquiry" in the social sciences. A critic proclaims her/his own incompetence, however, if the mere fact that a text has a ...