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Full-Text Articles in Race, Ethnicity and Post-Colonial Studies

College Latino Students: Cultural Integration, Retention, And Successful Completion, Robert Hernandez Nov 2005

College Latino Students: Cultural Integration, Retention, And Successful Completion, Robert Hernandez

Staff Publications & Research

The purpose of this study was to examine and gain a deeper understanding of Latino College students' sub-cultures and how their cultural integration can affect their retention and completion of a baccalaureate degree. Also, this study sought to understand the cultural factors that influenced student retention. The participants were given a survey to complete for demographic information, and then were interviewed to capture each of their stories and experiences.

Twenty participants were involved in the study. All of the participants were self-identified as Latinos and came from several different, four-year, residential universities. There were nine men and eleven women. Of ...


"Brown Flight": Secondary Movement Among Mexican Immigrants, Carlos Garcia Aug 2005

"Brown Flight": Secondary Movement Among Mexican Immigrants, Carlos Garcia

Faculty Publications, Sociology

The past ten years have seen the continued growth of the Mexican origin population in the United States. This growth has been accompanied by the movement of immigrants away from their traditional settlement locations in the Southwest. Using data collected in a small community in Northeastern Oklahoma I explore factors that motivate the movement of Mexican immigrants to nontraditional locations. I find these movements are motivated by a search for a higher quality of life. In effect this movement represents a form of "Brown flight" away from urban centers to rural locations. In areas such as these, respondents find many ...


Noticias De Naccs, Vol. 32, No. 1-2, Spring/Summer 2005, National Association For Chicana And Chicano Studies Apr 2005

Noticias De Naccs, Vol. 32, No. 1-2, Spring/Summer 2005, National Association For Chicana And Chicano Studies

Noticias de NACCS Newsletter

No abstract provided.


Crossing Borderlands: The Face Of Chicana Border Literature, Irene Ruiz Apr 2005

Crossing Borderlands: The Face Of Chicana Border Literature, Irene Ruiz

McNair Scholars Research Journal

Chicana literature details the trials and tribulations of Chicana life at the borderlands of the United States and Mexico. In particular it focuses on different challenges Chicana women face at the borderlands they must cross. While borderlands are usually represented as physical, many are not. Using Sandra Cisneros’ Women Hollering Creek, Denise Chavez’s Loving Pedro Infante, Maria Amparo Escandon’s Esperanza’s Box of Saints, and Alicia Gaspar de Alba’s, The Mystery of Survival, I will explore several common themes that relate to Chicana identity and the struggles that they must go through to overcome these barriers. I ...


Gang Violence And Latino Youth In Chicano Literature: The Loss Of Potential, Maria C. Lara Apr 2005

Gang Violence And Latino Youth In Chicano Literature: The Loss Of Potential, Maria C. Lara

McNair Scholars Research Journal

This literature analysis examines the representation of violence in Chicano literature, in particular, gang violence. The violent culture of gangs in the Chicano community is an essential aspect of the works of Luis Rodriguez, Mona Ruiz, Yxta Maya Murray, and Alejandro Morales. By examining the lives of the protagonists in a selection of works by these authors, this analysis aims to determine how gang violence affects the Latino youth portrayed in the texts. The analysis reveals that Latino youth who live in communities where violent gang activities are a part of everyday life often end up joining gangs. The characters ...


Naccs 32nd Annual Conference, National Association For Chicana And Chicano Studies Mar 2005

Naccs 32nd Annual Conference, National Association For Chicana And Chicano Studies

NACCS Conference Programs

Visión: Articulating, Imagining, and Contextualizing Chicana/o Spaces
April 13-17
Hyatt Regency


Sosa Family: John J. Arguelles (Youth), George Kim Jan 2005

Sosa Family: John J. Arguelles (Youth), George Kim

Mexican American Stories

In the U.S. the word machismo often connotes forceful, even aggressive behavior. Elsewhere, some see its meaning as the basic ability to take care of one’s self, to endure difficult times, and to build a family foundation. Machismo is a code that embraces self-mastery, courage, consistency, fair dealings and personal honesty. John achieved machismo, a mark of maturity, through his commitment to family, success in achieving goals despite adverse conditions, and pride in his Mexican heritage…


Sosa Family: Evangelina Sosa (Elder), Tammy Hunt Jan 2005

Sosa Family: Evangelina Sosa (Elder), Tammy Hunt

Mexican American Stories

Evangelina Sosa begins her story of love and family in Sonora, Mexico. She was born in a small town called Agua Prieta, but raised in Sonora. Life in Mexico revolved around her large family of eleven brothers and sisters. Her father worked as a carpenter and her mother was a homemaker and seamstress. Although Evangelina was only able to attend school through the sixth grade, her mother taught her important domestic skills. Evangelina learned to sew and cook at a very young age, which enabled her to help her mother care for the large family and assist with the sewing…


Cuevas Family: Angel Cuevas (Elder), Jenna Aguilera Jan 2005

Cuevas Family: Angel Cuevas (Elder), Jenna Aguilera

Mexican American Stories

Angel Cuevas was born in San Nicolas de Acuna Jalisco, Mexico, in 1936. He grew up in a loving family but was challenged from a young age to seek a better life. On the other hand, as a member of a Mexican family, he was taught one of life’s greatest virtues—respect for others and particularly for one’s family. He has always tried to improve himself while maintaining strong family ties…


Sosa Family: Olivia Sosa (Middle), April Foster Jan 2005

Sosa Family: Olivia Sosa (Middle), April Foster

Mexican American Stories

A young Olivia was told many things, “stand up straight,” “chew with your mouth closed” and other such demands. Often, requests such as those fall upon deaf ears. Olivia was also told to stay in school and get an education. This, she did not forget. These words have remained with her throughout her life. Graduating from University of the Pacific, Olivia has followed this advice as she continues learning as a successful business woman…


Cuevas Family: Ricardo Antonio Cuevas (Youth), Brandon Stevens Jan 2005

Cuevas Family: Ricardo Antonio Cuevas (Youth), Brandon Stevens

Mexican American Stories

Between 1910 and 1930, over one million Mexicans migrated to the U.S. to seek a better life. Still today, the dream of creating better living circumstances continues to motivate people to take this hazardous journey. Each day, hundreds of Mexican men, women and children risk their lives crossing the border into the U.S. They travel through the cold mountains, the desert and valleys. Many of these immigrants have come to the U.S. in search of employment in numerous industries. For the Cuevas family, the dream of a new life in the U.S., outweighed the danger of ...


Cuevas Family: Ricardo Cuevas (Middle), Janelle Fleming Jan 2005

Cuevas Family: Ricardo Cuevas (Middle), Janelle Fleming

Mexican American Stories

Growing up as the eldest of five children, Ricardo Cuevas had a sense of responsibility and of being more of an adult than his younger siblings. Ricardo was born in Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico, and grew up in the neighboring town of Zapotitan. He has three sisters—Reynalda, Angelica, Marisela and a brother Gerardo. His feelings of responsibility were enhanced by the absence of his father, who first came to the U.S. in 1961. Ricardo’s father wanted to make a better life for his family, but to do that he first had to leave behind his wife and two ...


Homegirls In The Public Sphere By Miranda, Marie (Keta) Review By: Yost, Bambi, Bambi L. Yost Jan 2005

Homegirls In The Public Sphere By Miranda, Marie (Keta) Review By: Yost, Bambi, Bambi L. Yost

Bambi L Yost

Abstrat is not available. Citation: Homegirls in the Public Sphere by Miranda, Marie (Keta) Review by: Yost, Bambi Children, Youth and Environments Vol. 15, No. 1, Environmental Health, and Other Papers (2005) , pp. 406-413 Published by: The Board of Regents of the University of Colorado, a body corporate, for the benefit of the Children, Youth and Environments Center at the University of Colorado Boulder Stable URL: http://0-www.jstor.org.library.simmons.edu/stable/10.7721/chilyoutenvi.15.1.0406


Retranslating Differences, Aaron Monty Jan 2005

Retranslating Differences, Aaron Monty

Cleveland State Law Review

The immense diversity among Latinos has begun to separate instead of unite us, making it difficult for the Latino "voice" to be articulated. prevents homogenous connections from being made among the divergent people that comprise the Latino community. These homogenous connections are necessary in order for the truth about the Latino perspective to be understood: It is as diverse as the people from whom it comes.