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Full-Text Articles in Race, Ethnicity and Post-Colonial Studies

Current Issues And Developments In Psychology With Regards To Latina/O Americans, Rachel Giddings Jan 2016

Current Issues And Developments In Psychology With Regards To Latina/O Americans, Rachel Giddings

2016 Symposium

Past research has shown that the Chicano/Latino community experience mental illness differently than other populations, and they are largely underserved by mental health professionals. This work explores the underrepresentation of culturally diverse individuals seeking and utilizing psychological services due to the lack of cultural sensitivity of therapists; cynicism by mental health professionals, and an outlook that therapy can be used as an oppressive tool by those in power (Sue & Sue, 1999). In short, there is much apprehension towards traditional therapeutic and intervention models in which most therapists have been educated on are based on and designed to meet the ...


The Necessity Of Minority Ethnic Studies In The American Education Curriculum, Destiny L. Vaught Jan 2016

The Necessity Of Minority Ethnic Studies In The American Education Curriculum, Destiny L. Vaught

2016 Symposium

From the very start of the educational career students are rarely exposed to the history, culture, and contributions of other ethnic groups that tie together the American way of life, past and present. Not until individuals reach higher education, are they introduced to studies that are designed specifically to enlighten the student’s knowledge of minorities and other ethnicities in the United States. In this study, I used peer review sources to highlight the advantages of schools that teach ethnic studies classes and the importance of understanding different groups of people at an earlier stage in a student’s life ...


Fearless Friday: Ashley Fernandez, Christina L. Bassler Oct 2015

Fearless Friday: Ashley Fernandez, Christina L. Bassler

SURGE

This week, SURGE is delighted to honor Ashley Fernandez ’16 for Fearless Friday!

Ashley is a senior at Gettysburg and is majoring in Political Science and Public Policy. When asked where she’s from, Ashley usually responds “Manhattan.” When most people think of Manhattan, they think of Times Square or the Empire State Building. Ashley, however, clarifies she’s from an area of Manhattan called Washington Heights, or “Little Dominican Republic,” which is named as such for it’s large Latino community. A Latina herself, Ashley definitely felt the change between Little DR and Gettysburg College. At predominantly white college ...


The Shortcomings Of A "Diverse" College Campus, Chelsea E. Broe Aug 2013

The Shortcomings Of A "Diverse" College Campus, Chelsea E. Broe

SURGE

“What is the diversity like at Gettysburg College?” As a tour guide, I get asked this question a lot. It’s a tricky question to answer: On one hand, I know that this is probably the family’s way of inquiring about race on campus without having to use such a taboo word, but on the other, my Diversity Peer Educator training chimes in and I want to challenge my questioner’s assumptions about what diversity even means. [excerpt]


College Latino Students: Cultural Integration, Retention, And Successful Completion, Robert Hernandez Nov 2005

College Latino Students: Cultural Integration, Retention, And Successful Completion, Robert Hernandez

Staff Publications & Research

The purpose of this study was to examine and gain a deeper understanding of Latino College students' sub-cultures and how their cultural integration can affect their retention and completion of a baccalaureate degree. Also, this study sought to understand the cultural factors that influenced student retention. The participants were given a survey to complete for demographic information, and then were interviewed to capture each of their stories and experiences.

Twenty participants were involved in the study. All of the participants were self-identified as Latinos and came from several different, four-year, residential universities. There were nine men and eleven women. Of ...