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Articles 1111 - 1130 of 1130

Full-Text Articles in Philosophy of Mind

The Athletic Contest As A "Tragic" Form Of Art, Francis Keenan Jan 1972

The Athletic Contest As A "Tragic" Form Of Art, Francis Keenan

Philosophic Exchange

Aristotle’s model of tragedy in his Poetics emphasizes process over outcome. This paper will apply that model to athletic contests. It will be argued that the win-lose approach is not the only viable method for judging excellence in athletics. Tragedy affords another kind of meaning for an athletic contest.


Locating Consent And Dissent In American Religion, Martin E. Marty Jan 1972

Locating Consent And Dissent In American Religion, Martin E. Marty

Philosophic Exchange

Despite the legal separation of church and state in America, religion continues to play a vital role in American public life. This paper identifies the dual role of religion in American public life as both unifying and reforming. The unifying role has been more significant than the reforming role.


Some Impressions Of Martin E. Marty's Paper: "Locating Consent And Dissent In American Religion, Tad Clements Jan 1972

Some Impressions Of Martin E. Marty's Paper: "Locating Consent And Dissent In American Religion, Tad Clements

Philosophic Exchange

Martin Marty agrees with the Supreme Court that the American people are a religions people. In order to determine whether or not this is true, it is necessary to clarify exactly what it means. However, Martin Marty has not given us any account of exactly what this means, and thus he is in no position to assert it.


On Understanding Indian Philosophical Thinking, D. C. Mathur Jan 1972

On Understanding Indian Philosophical Thinking, D. C. Mathur

Philosophic Exchange

Professor Potter interprets Indian philosophy as mainly concerned with moksa or transcendental freedom. Professor Riepe offers a Marxist interpretation of Indian philosophy. The aim of this paper is to identify the strengths and limitations of each of these two views.


Indian Philosophy's Alleged Religious Orientation, Karl H. Potter Jan 1972

Indian Philosophy's Alleged Religious Orientation, Karl H. Potter

Philosophic Exchange

Until recently, it has been assumed that Indian philosophy is essentially religious. That is because it is essentially driven by the religious motivations of the Hindus and Buddhists who practice it. This paper defends this assumption against some recent revisionists who reject it.


Response To Weitz, William P. Alston Jan 1972

Response To Weitz, William P. Alston

Philosophic Exchange

Professor Weitz contends that there are no necessary conditions of human action. This paper will focus on his objections to the theories of Roderick Chisholm, Donald Davidson, and others. The disagreement turns on the correct interpretation of certain cases. For example, is falling in love an action? What about missing a target?


The Concept Of Human Action, Morris Weitz Jan 1972

The Concept Of Human Action, Morris Weitz

Philosophic Exchange

Philosophical theories of human action aim to state necessary conditions of human action. The thesis of this paper is that there are no such conditions. The concept of a human action is essentially an open concept. It is not governed by any set of necessary conditions. The paper considers and rejects several recent attempts to state necessary conditions of human action, including those of Donald Davidson and Roderick Chisholm


Unconscious Actions Emanating From The Human Cerebral Cortex, John C. Eccles Jan 1972

Unconscious Actions Emanating From The Human Cerebral Cortex, John C. Eccles

Philosophic Exchange

This paper presents some recent work of Roger Sperry and his associates on “split-brain cases.” The remarkable finding is that, after surgery, the actions that are programmed from one side of the cerebral cortex are not recognized by the other side of the cerebral cortex as belonging to the subject.


On The Proper Interpretation Of Indian Religion And Philosophy, Dan Riepe Jan 1972

On The Proper Interpretation Of Indian Religion And Philosophy, Dan Riepe

Philosophic Exchange

This paper opposes Professor Potter’s idealistic interpretation of Indian philosophy. By contrast, I defend a Marxist, historical materialist interpretation of Indian philosophy.


On Being In The Mind, Roderick Firth Jan 1971

On Being In The Mind, Roderick Firth

Philosophic Exchange

There is exactly one good reason to prefer dualism to the identity theory, and it is is this: whereas brain events occur in a particular spatial location inside the head, it is nonsensical to say that mental events occur in any particular location. Professor Shaffer’s other objections to the identity theory are either parasitic on this one, or else unsuccessful.


Ethical And Epistemic Dilemmas Of Behaviorism And The Identity Thesis, George J. Stack Jan 1971

Ethical And Epistemic Dilemmas Of Behaviorism And The Identity Thesis, George J. Stack

Philosophic Exchange

Jerome Shaffer’s argument against behaviorism and the identity theory assume that the wrongness of causing pain is constituted entirely by that effect. However, the intrinsic wrongness of such actions lies in the intentions of the agent, not in the physical responses of the victim.


The Philosophy Of Mind And Some Ethical Implications, Jerome A. Shaffer Jan 1971

The Philosophy Of Mind And Some Ethical Implications, Jerome A. Shaffer

Philosophic Exchange

Materialism is the view that the only things in existence are material – matter in motion. Materialists hold that mental events are either identical to bodily events, or that mental events are particular kinds of behavior exhibited by particular material objects. These theories face several serious problems, involving spatial location, privileged access, and other phenomena. Moreover, these theories cannot explain why it is wrong to cause pain in another person. It is not obvious why it is wrong to cause another person to exhibit pain behavior, nor is it obviously wrong to cause physical events to occur in another person’s ...


An Honest Ghost?, A. J. Ayer Jan 1970

An Honest Ghost?, A. J. Ayer

Philosophic Exchange

Gilbert Ryle’s The Concept of Mind purports to exorcise “the ghost in the machine” by translating all talk about the mind into talk about behavior, and sometimes Ryle asserts that he has succeeded in this endeavor. However, on closer inspection, there is still a residue of our private, mental lives left in Ryle’s account. So the ghost remains. But perhaps it is a more honest ghost, and that is still quite an achievement.


Professor Ayer’S Honest Ghost, Justus Hartnack Jan 1970

Professor Ayer’S Honest Ghost, Justus Hartnack

Philosophic Exchange

Professor Ayer is right that Ryle’s strongest thesis is incorrect. However, I do not agree with all of Ayer’s arguments for that conclusion. I also wish that Professor Ayer had examined some other mental concepts, which also seem to resist any kind of behaviorist reduction.


Response To Professor A. J. Ayer, Richard Taylor Jan 1970

Response To Professor A. J. Ayer, Richard Taylor

Philosophic Exchange

Professor Ryle does not deny the common distinction between inner and outer, nor that between public and private. What he denies is that either of these distinctions entail a third distinction – between minds and bodies. As far as I can tell, Professor Ayer has not shown that Ryle is mistaken about that.


Paul Feyerabend, Against Method (Typoscript 1969), Rudolf Kaehr Jan 1969

Paul Feyerabend, Against Method (Typoscript 1969), Rudolf Kaehr

Rudolf Kaehr

Facsimile of Paul Feyerabend's AGAINST METHOD Original typoscript of Against Methods from 1968 with handwritten corrections. Last sentence, p. 116: "We must take care that it does not lose its ability to make such a choice."


Paul Feyerabend's Telegram, Rudolf Kaehr Jan 1968

Paul Feyerabend's Telegram, Rudolf Kaehr

Rudolf Kaehr

6-page telegram from Paul Feyerabend (London) to Rolf Kaehr (Westberlin) Telegram 1 I am ill. Please let the seminar continue in my absence. Inform Prof Landmann and Prof Huebner, cancel the hotel reservation and read the following final message to my class on tuesday 1pm: I am sorry that I cannot give what Telegram 2 would have been my last lecture to you. In this lecture I would have elaborated on Verons argument and would have tried to show that it also excludes consience, self expression, identification. Turning back to the empiricist methodology and demand for theoretical unification I would ...


The Thomistic Concept Of The Faculty Of Choice, William Gilden Apr 1955

The Thomistic Concept Of The Faculty Of Choice, William Gilden

Philosophy Undergraduate Theses

What is it? What is it that permits us to follow one line of action rather then another? Constantly throughout every hour, day or year, in fact throughout a life time, we find ourselves selecting one good in preference to another.

The small child, when confronted with the problem of picking either the Saturday afternoon matinee, or the privilege of "staying up with the folks" on Saturday night, finds that he is forced to make a preference, i.e., one course of action selected over the other. When selecting their TV programs, the wise mother will caution her children, "You ...


What About God? A Business Man’S Philosophy (Annotation), Roger W. Babson Jan 1935

What About God? A Business Man’S Philosophy (Annotation), Roger W. Babson

Annotated Bibliography

No abstract provided.


Enduring Investments (Annotation), Roger W. Babson Jan 1921

Enduring Investments (Annotation), Roger W. Babson

Annotated Bibliography

No abstract provided.