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Feminist Philosophy Commons

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Philosophy & Comparative Religion Department Faculty Publications

Ethics and Political Philosophy

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Full-Text Articles in Feminist Philosophy

How Should Feminist Autonomy Theorists Respond To The Problem Of Internalized Oppression?, Sonya Charles Jul 2010

How Should Feminist Autonomy Theorists Respond To The Problem Of Internalized Oppression?, Sonya Charles

Philosophy & Comparative Religion Department Faculty Publications

In "Autonomy and the Feminist Intuition," Natalie Stoljar asks whether a procedural or a substantive approach to autonomy is best for addressing feminist concerns. In this paper, I build on Stoljar's argument that feminists should adopt a strong substantive approach to autonomy. After briefly reviewing the problems with a purely procedural approach, I begin to articulate my own strong substantive theory by focusing specifically on the problem of internalized oppression. In the final section, I briefly address some of the concerns raised by procedural theorists who are leery of a substantive approach.


The Mammography Screening Controversy: Who And What Is Heard In The Press?, Sonya Charles, Margaret Holmes-Rovner Jan 2003

The Mammography Screening Controversy: Who And What Is Heard In The Press?, Sonya Charles, Margaret Holmes-Rovner

Philosophy & Comparative Religion Department Faculty Publications

The objective of this project was to analyze newspaper coverage of the January 2000 meta-analysis by Gotzsche and Olsen, “Is screening for breast cancer with mammography justified?” [Lancet 355 (2000) 129]. A content analysis was performed on a comprehensive set of newspaper clippings from the UK during the 2 weeks following publication of the Lancet article. The original authors were most quoted in Wave 1 (the first weekend); the screening programme was most quoted in Wave 2 (week 2). Screening programme description, and the “quality” of the Lancet article dominated Wave 1; patient testimonials increased in Wave 2. Newspaper articles ...