Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Feminist Philosophy Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 5 of 5

Full-Text Articles in Feminist Philosophy

Cultivating Perception: Phenomenological Encounters With Artworks, Helen Fielding Jan 2015

Cultivating Perception: Phenomenological Encounters With Artworks, Helen Fielding

Helen A Fielding

Phenomenally strong artworks have the potential to anchor us in the world and to cultivate our perception. For the most part, we barely notice the world around us, as we are too often elsewhere, texting, coordinating schedules, planning ahead, navigating what needs to be done. This is the level of our age that shapes the ways we encounter the world and others. In such a world it is no wonder we no longer trust our senses. But as feminists have long argued, grounding our thinking in embodied experience opens it up to difference and helps us to resist the colonization ...


The Poetry Of Habit: Beauvoir And Merleau-Ponty On Aging Embodiment, Helen A. Fielding Dec 2013

The Poetry Of Habit: Beauvoir And Merleau-Ponty On Aging Embodiment, Helen A. Fielding

Helen A Fielding

As people age their actions often become entrenched—we might say they are not open to the new; they are less able to adapt; they are stuck in a rut. Indeed, in The Coming of Age (La Vieillesse) Simone de Beauvoir writes that to be old is to be condemned neither to freedom nor to meaning, but rather to boredom (Beauvoir 1996, 461; 486). While in many ways a very pessimistic account of ageing, the text does provide promising moments where her descriptions do capture other possibilities for aged existence. In particular, I turn to Beauvoir’s suggestion that habit ...


A Phenomenology Of ‘The Other World’: On Irigaray’S ‘To Paint The Invisible', Helen A. Fielding Dec 2007

A Phenomenology Of ‘The Other World’: On Irigaray’S ‘To Paint The Invisible', Helen A. Fielding

Helen A Fielding


As we know, Merleau-Ponty was struggling with a dynamic shift in his thinking at the premature end of his life.  In those last notes he raises the question of how to elaborate a phenomenology of “’the other world’, as the limit of a phenomenology of the imaginary and the ‘hidden’”—a phenomenology that would open onto an invisible life, community, other and culture (VI, Jan. 1960).  In her essay on “Eye and Mind”, “To Paint the Invisible”, Luce Irigaray shows why Merleau-Ponty was not yet ready to address this question, why he was not yet ready to engage the limits ...


This Body Of Art: The Singular Plural Of The Feminine, Helen A. Fielding Sep 2005

This Body Of Art: The Singular Plural Of The Feminine, Helen A. Fielding

Helen A Fielding

I explore the possibility that the feminine, like art, can be thought in terms of Jean-Luc Nancy’s concept of the singular plural. In Les Muses, Nancy claims that art provides for the rethinking of a technë not ruled by instrumentality. Specifically, in rethinking aesthetics in terms of the debates laid out by Kant, Hegel and Heidegger, he resituates the ontological in terms of the specificity of the techniques of each particular artwork; each artwork establishes relations particular to its world or worlds. What is at stake in the singular plural is the multiplicity of relations that are lost in ...


Only Blood Would Be More Red: Irigaray, Merleau-Ponty And The Ethics Of Sexual Difference, Helen A. Fielding Apr 2001

Only Blood Would Be More Red: Irigaray, Merleau-Ponty And The Ethics Of Sexual Difference, Helen A. Fielding

Helen A Fielding

Irigaray turns to Merleau-Ponty's intuitions about the perception of color to develop her own insights into the creative emergence of sexuate identity. As a quality of the flesh, color cannot be reduced to formal codes. The privileging of word and text inherent to Western culture suppresses the coming into being of the embodied subject in his or her own situated context. Color, tied as it is to a corporeal creativity could provide an important link since it facilitates reflection, and a re-enfleshing through color of a differentiated sexuate identity tied to the imagination as well as to genetic identity.