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Articles 61 - 74 of 74

Full-Text Articles in Feminist Philosophy

Records And The Man, Paul Weiss Jan 1972

Records And The Man, Paul Weiss

Philosophic Exchange

Athletic records are cherished because of their assumed impartiality and objectivity. However, athletic records do not fully and accurately describe the events that they purport to describe. That is because athletic records do not take account of the myriad factors that influence the outcome of any athletic event. Contingency, novelty, luck, obstacles and opportunities all make a difference to what is achieved. Since records abstract from all of these, they do not tell us what did occur, but only the outcome of a multitude of factors of which we take no notice. The singular goal of an athlete is to ...


On Weiss On Records, Athletic Activity, And The Athlete, Richard Schacht Jan 1972

On Weiss On Records, Athletic Activity, And The Athlete, Richard Schacht

Philosophic Exchange

Professor Weiss and I agree in denying that the end or goal of athletic activity can be adequately characterized in terms of setting records. However, we seem to disagree about the fundamental nature and goal of athletic activity. Professor Weiss’s athlete strikes me as a kind of fanatic, whose athletic activity excludes other goals and projects. By contrast, I would argue that the goal of athletic activity is the intrinsic enjoyment that one may derive from it, and this goal is perfectly compatible with having many other goals and projects in life.


On Weiss On Records And On The Significance Of Athletic Records, Warren Fraleigh Jan 1972

On Weiss On Records And On The Significance Of Athletic Records, Warren Fraleigh

Philosophic Exchange

Athletic records cannot provide complete insight into the nature of an athletic event. However, certainly they can provide at least some approximation of what happened, and that is enough to justify the significant interest that we take in athletic records.


Ontological Possibilties: Sport As Play, Scott Kretchmar Jan 1972

Ontological Possibilties: Sport As Play, Scott Kretchmar

Philosophic Exchange

It is often thought that sport is highly incompatible with play, since the competitiveness of sport requires a degree of seriousness and commitment that are at odds with the freedom of play. However, this paper will argue that the competitive fullness of sport is compatible with play, even if not perfectly coextensive with it.


Locating Consent And Dissent In American Religion: A Comment, Charles Y. Glock Jan 1972

Locating Consent And Dissent In American Religion: A Comment, Charles Y. Glock

Philosophic Exchange

I agree with Professor Marty that denominational religion has on balance contributed more to maintaining social stability than to fostering social change in American history. However, I believe that this is because religion has offered direct ideological support for the status quo. It has done this by providing compensations for those who are ill served by existing social arrangements.


The Athletic Contest As A "Tragic" Form Of Art, Francis Keenan Jan 1972

The Athletic Contest As A "Tragic" Form Of Art, Francis Keenan

Philosophic Exchange

Aristotle’s model of tragedy in his Poetics emphasizes process over outcome. This paper will apply that model to athletic contests. It will be argued that the win-lose approach is not the only viable method for judging excellence in athletics. Tragedy affords another kind of meaning for an athletic contest.


Locating Consent And Dissent In American Religion, Martin E. Marty Jan 1972

Locating Consent And Dissent In American Religion, Martin E. Marty

Philosophic Exchange

Despite the legal separation of church and state in America, religion continues to play a vital role in American public life. This paper identifies the dual role of religion in American public life as both unifying and reforming. The unifying role has been more significant than the reforming role.


Some Impressions Of Martin E. Marty's Paper: "Locating Consent And Dissent In American Religion, Tad Clements Jan 1972

Some Impressions Of Martin E. Marty's Paper: "Locating Consent And Dissent In American Religion, Tad Clements

Philosophic Exchange

Martin Marty agrees with the Supreme Court that the American people are a religions people. In order to determine whether or not this is true, it is necessary to clarify exactly what it means. However, Martin Marty has not given us any account of exactly what this means, and thus he is in no position to assert it.


On Understanding Indian Philosophical Thinking, D. C. Mathur Jan 1972

On Understanding Indian Philosophical Thinking, D. C. Mathur

Philosophic Exchange

Professor Potter interprets Indian philosophy as mainly concerned with moksa or transcendental freedom. Professor Riepe offers a Marxist interpretation of Indian philosophy. The aim of this paper is to identify the strengths and limitations of each of these two views.


Indian Philosophy's Alleged Religious Orientation, Karl H. Potter Jan 1972

Indian Philosophy's Alleged Religious Orientation, Karl H. Potter

Philosophic Exchange

Until recently, it has been assumed that Indian philosophy is essentially religious. That is because it is essentially driven by the religious motivations of the Hindus and Buddhists who practice it. This paper defends this assumption against some recent revisionists who reject it.


Response To Weitz, William P. Alston Jan 1972

Response To Weitz, William P. Alston

Philosophic Exchange

Professor Weitz contends that there are no necessary conditions of human action. This paper will focus on his objections to the theories of Roderick Chisholm, Donald Davidson, and others. The disagreement turns on the correct interpretation of certain cases. For example, is falling in love an action? What about missing a target?


The Concept Of Human Action, Morris Weitz Jan 1972

The Concept Of Human Action, Morris Weitz

Philosophic Exchange

Philosophical theories of human action aim to state necessary conditions of human action. The thesis of this paper is that there are no such conditions. The concept of a human action is essentially an open concept. It is not governed by any set of necessary conditions. The paper considers and rejects several recent attempts to state necessary conditions of human action, including those of Donald Davidson and Roderick Chisholm


Unconscious Actions Emanating From The Human Cerebral Cortex, John C. Eccles Jan 1972

Unconscious Actions Emanating From The Human Cerebral Cortex, John C. Eccles

Philosophic Exchange

This paper presents some recent work of Roger Sperry and his associates on “split-brain cases.” The remarkable finding is that, after surgery, the actions that are programmed from one side of the cerebral cortex are not recognized by the other side of the cerebral cortex as belonging to the subject.


On The Proper Interpretation Of Indian Religion And Philosophy, Dan Riepe Jan 1972

On The Proper Interpretation Of Indian Religion And Philosophy, Dan Riepe

Philosophic Exchange

This paper opposes Professor Potter’s idealistic interpretation of Indian philosophy. By contrast, I defend a Marxist, historical materialist interpretation of Indian philosophy.