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Feminist Philosophy Commons

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Full-Text Articles in Feminist Philosophy

The Willfulness Of A Missing Frame: Ahmed Zaki And The Politics Of Visual Resistance, Miriam M. Gabriel Jun 2017

The Willfulness Of A Missing Frame: Ahmed Zaki And The Politics Of Visual Resistance, Miriam M. Gabriel

All Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

Ahmed Zaki (1949-2005) is one of Egyptian cinema’s most prominent leading actors, with work spanning three decades of critical films that informed a generation’s visual register of masculinity. However, the beginnings of his career were marked by public skepticism around his place as a leading actor due to him being “too dark” and “too poor”; as his career continued to flourish, those very markings of racing and classing Zaki because a foundation for increasingly stamping his public image with the “authenticity” of an Egyptian citizen. At a particularly neoliberal moment in the Egyptian economy, that of the early ...


Spectral Bodies: Women's Resistance Across Time In North America, Whitney C. Evanson Jun 2017

Spectral Bodies: Women's Resistance Across Time In North America, Whitney C. Evanson

All Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

This project contrasts the lived experiences of feminists within the EZLN in Mexico with the historical persecution of community outsiders during the Salem witch trials. I want to explore the differences between a radical political and social movement (the EZLN), and the radical shift in history in which women were accused of witchcraft based on hysteria and rumors. There are parallels between the witch trials and the causes of the Zapatista movement in the ways that women's bodies were treated--their political usefulness to create fear and obedience from citizens by murdering them for their defiance, burying them in shallow ...


Creatures Of Play, Melissa Shelton May 2017

Creatures Of Play, Melissa Shelton

Graduate School of Art Theses

This thesis explores my practice as an artist and my work’s cultural, theoretical and social contexts, such carnival theory, feminist studies and film studies, as well as references to mythology and my own biography. I discuss forms of representation of gendered identities through my work in drawing, performance, animation, video and installation.

The masks we wear become as real as our bare face. Through the act of doubling the representation, my thesis work BECOMING/a fine line situates the mask as the mediator between reflections, mirroring the identity and the notion of performativity. Embracing a certain incompleteness and embodying ...


“Don’T You Have Anything Better To Do?” : A Care-Focused Feminist Analysis Of Undertale, Evan Marzahn Apr 2017

“Don’T You Have Anything Better To Do?” : A Care-Focused Feminist Analysis Of Undertale, Evan Marzahn

Women's and Gender Studies: Student Scholarship & Creative Works

This paper explores the feminist ethic of care in Undertale's "meta" narrative and gameplay from the perspective of an avid gamer. Using Nel Noddings' ethical framework to analyze the actions and attitudes of the characters (including the player) and their consequences, I argue that Undertale provides distinctively feminist ethical gameplay that not only criticizes the frequent violence in role-playing games, but also encourages the player to always approach any interaction with a character (or a real person) as an encounter between individuals whose unique circumstances and needs must be considered.


The Monstrous Self: Negotiating The Boundary Of The Abject, Katya Yakubov Jan 2017

The Monstrous Self: Negotiating The Boundary Of The Abject, Katya Yakubov

Theses and Dissertations

Through the lens of the horror film and the fairy tale, this thesis explores the notion of the grotesque as a boundary phenomenon—a negotiation of what is self and what is other. As such, it locates the function that the monstrous and the grotesque have in the formation of a personal and social identity. In asking why we take pleasure in the perverse, I explore how permutations of guilt, victimhood, and desire can be actively rewritten, in order to construct a stable sense of self.