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Philosophy

Philosophy Faculty Publications

2005

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Philosophy

Review Of Johanna Oksala's Foucault On Freedom, Ladelle Mcwhorter Nov 2005

Review Of Johanna Oksala's Foucault On Freedom, Ladelle Mcwhorter

Philosophy Faculty Publications

Johanna Oksala has produced a provocative reading of Michel Foucault's work on the issues of freedom and resistance to normalizing oppression. Although many commentators have contended that Foucault's historicization of subjectivity leads to metaphysical determinism and eliminates the very possibility of freedom in human life, Oksala argues that his radical rethinking of both bodies and freedom largely escapes the simplistic criticisms routinely put forward since the early 1980s. She does subject Foucault's work to criticisms of her own, however. While the title of her book leads the reader to expect a tight focus on the question of ...


The Species-Norm Account Of Moral Status, Scott Wilson Aug 2005

The Species-Norm Account Of Moral Status, Scott Wilson

Philosophy Faculty Publications

Many philosophers have argued against Singer’s claim that all animals are equal. However, none of these responses have demonstrated an appreciation of the complexity of his position. The result is that all of these responses focus on one of his arguments in a way that falls victim to another. This paper is a critical examination of a possible response to the full complexity of Singer’s position that derives from the work of Carl Cohen, Kathleen Wilkes, and F. Ramsey. On this response, a being’s moral status depends not on the capacities and abilities she does in fact ...


The Technology Of Biopower: A Response To Todd May's "Foucault Now?", Ladelle Mcwhorter Jan 2005

The Technology Of Biopower: A Response To Todd May's "Foucault Now?", Ladelle Mcwhorter

Philosophy Faculty Publications

Because the occasion for his essay was the inaugural conference of the newly formed Foucault Society in New York City in the spring of 2005, Todd May takes as his point of departure the question of whether Foucault’s work is valuable to the sort of people who have come together to form that society: philosophers, artists, political activists, and in general to concerned citizens today, twenty years after Michel Foucault’s death. As might be expected given the Society’s raison d’être, May answers this question in the affirmative. But exactly how is Foucault’s work still relevant ...