Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Philosophy Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Philosophy

Philosophy Faculty Publications

Gettysburg College

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Philosophy

Reflections On Reading Plato And Aristotle At Lancaster, Daniel R. Denicola Apr 2014

Reflections On Reading Plato And Aristotle At Lancaster, Daniel R. Denicola

Philosophy Faculty Publications

While serving as a Visiting Fellow at Lancaster University, I was asked to lead an informal seminar on Classical Philosophy. It was to be a reading group of postgraduate students and staff, focusing on two foundational texts of Western civilization: Plato’s Republic and Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics. I happily accepted. The resulting two-hour, weekly sessions over Michaelmas Term were lively times of philosophical effervescence, full of probative questions, interesting interpretations, diverse evaluations, vigorous debates, and shared insights. Postmodernists engaged in the holy act of Interpreting the Text, we nonetheless strained to grasp the “true meaning” of the texts, to ...


Paradigms And Paraphernalia: On The Relationship Of Theory And Technology In Science, Daniel R. Denicola Jan 1991

Paradigms And Paraphernalia: On The Relationship Of Theory And Technology In Science, Daniel R. Denicola

Philosophy Faculty Publications

What is the connection between theory and technology in science? What is the relationship between the various activities of "doing" science and the instruments that enable these activities? My interest here is to explore these questions in a very broad and elementary way, occasionally citing examples plucked from the history of science. [excerpt]


The Philosopher, The Teacher, And The Quest For Clarity, Daniel R. Denicola Jan 1978

The Philosopher, The Teacher, And The Quest For Clarity, Daniel R. Denicola

Philosophy Faculty Publications

As the weeks have come and gone, my inflated expectations for this address have been punctured. I once hoped to take the presidential torch into some unexplored recess of the philosophical cave, there to illuminate an unsuspected cavern that would sparkle with truth. Cut and polished crystals of new truth would be the yield from my address. But then I remembered Whitehead's dictum that "It is more important that a proposition be interesting than that it be true." Thinking this to be particularly sound advice for one whose role is to close a long day of philosophizing, I decided ...