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Art

Continental Philosophy

Selected Works

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Philosophy

Cultivating Perception: Phenomenological Encounters With Artworks, Helen Fielding Jan 2015

Cultivating Perception: Phenomenological Encounters With Artworks, Helen Fielding

Helen A Fielding

Phenomenally strong artworks have the potential to anchor us in the world and to cultivate our perception. For the most part, we barely notice the world around us, as we are too often elsewhere, texting, coordinating schedules, planning ahead, navigating what needs to be done. This is the level of our age that shapes the ways we encounter the world and others. In such a world it is no wonder we no longer trust our senses. But as feminists have long argued, grounding our thinking in embodied experience opens it up to difference and helps us to resist the colonization ...


“The Problem Of Science” In Nietzsche And Heidegger, Babette Babich Nov 2012

“The Problem Of Science” In Nietzsche And Heidegger, Babette Babich

Babette Babich

Nietzsche and Heidegger pose important philosophical questions to science and its technological projects. The resultant contributes to what may be called a continental philosophy of science and I argue that only such a rigorously critical approach to the question of science permits a genuinely philosophical reflection on science. The resultant contributes to what may be called a continental philosophy of science and I argue that only such a rigorously critical approach to the question of science permits a genuinely philosophical reflection on science. More than a thoughtful reflection on science, however, the heart of philosophy is also at stake in ...


This Body Of Art: The Singular Plural Of The Feminine, Helen A. Fielding Sep 2005

This Body Of Art: The Singular Plural Of The Feminine, Helen A. Fielding

Helen A Fielding

I explore the possibility that the feminine, like art, can be thought in terms of Jean-Luc Nancy’s concept of the singular plural. In Les Muses, Nancy claims that art provides for the rethinking of a technë not ruled by instrumentality. Specifically, in rethinking aesthetics in terms of the debates laid out by Kant, Hegel and Heidegger, he resituates the ontological in terms of the specificity of the techniques of each particular artwork; each artwork establishes relations particular to its world or worlds. What is at stake in the singular plural is the multiplicity of relations that are lost in ...