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Full-Text Articles in Philosophy

Bodies: Punk, Love And Marxism, Kathryn Grant Jul 2016

Bodies: Punk, Love And Marxism, Kathryn Grant

Electronic Thesis and Dissertation Repository

This thesis returns love to the purview of Marxism and punk, which had attempted to ban the interpersonal in respective critiques of abstractions. Love-as-sense—as it is figured by Marx— will be distinguished from the love-of-love-songs, and from commodity fetishism and alienation, which relate to this recuperated love qua perception or experience. As its musical output exhibited residue of free love’s failure, and cited sixties pop which characterized love as mutual ownership, American and British punk from 1976-80 will be analyzed for its interrogation of commodified love. An introductory chapter will define love as an aesthetic activity and organize ...


Art As Display, Frank M. Boardman Jun 2016

Art As Display, Frank M. Boardman

All Dissertations, Theses, and Capstone Projects

Art is essentially a type of display. As an activity, art is what we do when we display objects with certain intentions. As a set of objects, art is all of those things that are displayed for those purposes. The artworld is the social atmosphere that surrounds this particular activity of display. And a history of art is an evolving narrative of change in the practice of this sort of display.

Specifically, to focus for convenience on art as a set of objects, this is what we can call the “displayed-object thesis”:

x is a work of art iff: (a ...


Una-Sola-Cosa: The Violence Of Aesthetics In Mao Ii And Estrella Distante, Erin Briana Cousins Jan 2016

Una-Sola-Cosa: The Violence Of Aesthetics In Mao Ii And Estrella Distante, Erin Briana Cousins

Comparative Literature Graduate Theses & Dissertations

This thesis explores the relationship between aesthetics and violence in Don DeLillo’s Mao II and Roberto Bolaño’s Estrella distante. Though each text’s central characters begin with an attachment to an idealized narrative of modern artistry, I argue that these idealizations are based on a conflation of literal and metaphorical violence. Such a conflation allows these characters to value violence purely for its ability to impact sense perception, forming what I call an aesthetic violence. By conflating literal and metaphorical violence into the aesthetic, I argue, each character is able to ignore the asymmetrical power dynamics inherent to ...