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Full-Text Articles in Philosophy

Answering Your Question: Knowing The Truth, Neal Deroo Feb 2016

Answering Your Question: Knowing The Truth, Neal Deroo

Faculty Work Comprehensive List

"To turn the question of truth towards the person of Christ then helps us answer the question of how we can know that we can know the truth."

Posting about ­­­­­­­­knowing the truth from In All Things - an online hub committed to the claim that the life,death, and resurrection of Jesus Christ has implications for the entire world.

http://inallthings.org/answering-your-question-knowing-the-truth/


A Moral Problem For Difficult Art, Antony Aumann Jan 2016

A Moral Problem For Difficult Art, Antony Aumann

Journal Articles

Works of art can be difficult in several ways. One important way is by making us face up to unsettling truths. Such works typically receive praise. I maintain, however, that sometimes they deserve moral censure. The crux of my argument is that, just as we have a right to know the truth in certain contexts, so too we have a right not to know it. Provided our ignorance does not harm or seriously endanger others, the decision about whether to know the truth ought to be left to us. Within this limit, therefore, difficult art is morally problematic if it ...


What Do We Mean By Logical Consequence?, Jesse Endo Jenks Jan 2016

What Do We Mean By Logical Consequence?, Jesse Endo Jenks

Summer Research

In the beginning of the 20th century, many prominent logicians and mathematicians, such as Frege, Russell, Hilbert, and many others, felt that mathematics needed a very rigorous foundation in logic. Many results of the time were motivated by questions about logical truth and logical consequence. The standard approach in the early part of the 20th century was to use a syntactic or proof-theoretic definition of logical consequence. This says that "for one sentence to be a logical consequence of [a set of premises] is simply for that sentence to be derivable from [them] by means of some standard system of ...


Scientific Fictionalism And The Problem Of Inconsistency In Nietzsche, Justin Remhof Jan 2016

Scientific Fictionalism And The Problem Of Inconsistency In Nietzsche, Justin Remhof

Philosophy Faculty Publications

In this article, I begin to develop Nietzsche’s scientific fictionalism in order to make headway toward resolving a central interpretive issue in his epistemology. For Nietzsche knowledge claims are falsifications. Presumably, this is a result of his puzzling view that truths are somehow false. I argue that Nietzsche thinks knowledge claims are falsifications because he embraces a scientific fictionalist view according to which inexact representations, which are false, can also be accurate, or true, and that this position is not inconsistent.