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Full-Text Articles in Philosophy

On The Meaning Of Kategoria In Aristotle's Categories, John P. Anton Dec 1983

On The Meaning Of Kategoria In Aristotle's Categories, John P. Anton

The Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy Newsletter

All the commentators who have suppressed the terminological difference between predicate and predication (κατηγορούμενον and κατηγορία) conclude that kategoria means 'predicate', thus lending their authority to a misreadng of the passages in which Aristotle uses the word κατηγορία to mean 'attributive proposition.' In this paper I take the position presented as an argument to support a different reading and with the hope that the established interpretation can be challenged through a fresh examination of the textual testimonies to accommodate the suppressed part of Aristotle's theory of categories as ultimate types of canonical propositions. The thesis that i seek to ...


Hierocles: Theory And Argument In The Second Century Ad, Brad Inwood Dec 1983

Hierocles: Theory And Argument In The Second Century Ad, Brad Inwood

The Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy Newsletter

I propose a consideration of two important questions concerning the traditional Stoic doctrine of oikeiosis, in an attempt to see the sort of position Hierocles takes on these central questions, to determine something about the intellectual milieu in which he operated and about his philosophical style. The larger goal will be to present a partial picture of Stoic philosophical activity in this later period which, I hope, will justify the belief that phllosophically interesting Stoicism did not die out with Poseidonius. The two questions are these: why does Hierocles devote so much of what survives of the Stoicheiosis to the ...


Some Remarks On Some Neoplatonic Discussions Of Some Mathematical Concepts, Ian Mueller Dec 1983

Some Remarks On Some Neoplatonic Discussions Of Some Mathematical Concepts, Ian Mueller

The Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy Newsletter

Despite their reverence for Plato, the Neoplatonists tended to associate mathematics very closely with the sensible. I here discuss two issues frequently raised in Neoplatonic discussions of the category of quantity. Both concern disputes about the relation of priority between two concepts, in one case quantity and quality, in the other the discrete and continuous.


What Plato's Demiurge Does, Richard D. Mohr Oct 1983

What Plato's Demiurge Does, Richard D. Mohr

The Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy Newsletter

The paper argues that the project of Plato’s craftsman-like god is directed to an epistemological end rather than an aesthetic one. The Demiurge is chiefly bent on improving the world’s intelligibility rather than its looks. Specifically, the paper argues that what the Demiurge does is to introduce standards or measures into the phenomenal realm by imaging as best he can the nature of Forms where Forms are construed as standards or measures. The two most spectacular examples of Demiurgic crafting on this model are: 1) his crafting the rational world-soul, which serves both as an object of human ...


Plato's Unwritten Dialectic Of The One And The Great And Small, John Niemeyer Findlay Oct 1983

Plato's Unwritten Dialectic Of The One And The Great And Small, John Niemeyer Findlay

The Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy Newsletter

In this essay Findlay summarizes his position that the Unwritten Doctrines of Plato, as outlined by Proclus, are essential for understanding the ontological theories of Plato's major dialogues.

A. Preus


Perception, Appearance And Kinesis: The Secret Doctrine Of Plato's Theaetetus, Veda Cobb-Stevens Oct 1983

Perception, Appearance And Kinesis: The Secret Doctrine Of Plato's Theaetetus, Veda Cobb-Stevens

The Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy Newsletter

At the end of the examination of the first definition of knowledge we find that both the definition and its (radical) ontological ground have been refuted. Yet in neither case have we been left with the mere negativity of the avoidance of error. For the refutations are not mere refutations. The overturning of the theory of Radical Flux leaves us free to return to the exposition with a clearer eye for the previously hidden truth of the theory of Mitigated Flux, and the destruction of the definition of knowledge as aisthesis by an appeal to the functioning of the soul ...


The 'Third Man Argument' And The Text Of The Parmenides, Robert G. Turnbull Oct 1983

The 'Third Man Argument' And The Text Of The Parmenides, Robert G. Turnbull

The Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy Newsletter

I attempt to show that the 'Large' argument of Parmenides 132 must be understood as part of the attempt to clarify Socrates' response to Zeno. The threat to that response is to the requirement that each form be one and not many. But it is also a threat to the very idea of having a share of a form. In context, the argument is underbrush clearing, getting an unworkable idea out of the way.


Participation In Plato's Dialogues: Phaedo, Parmenides, Sophist, And Timaeus, Leo Sweeney S.J. Oct 1983

Participation In Plato's Dialogues: Phaedo, Parmenides, Sophist, And Timaeus, Leo Sweeney S.J.

The Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy Newsletter

What was important to Plato was formal causality. From experiencing that many existents are (say) beautiful, he realized that there is a form or essence of beauty. And this causes the beauty in things by its presence somehow in them. Formal causality and participation are two sides of the same coin. But Plato came to realize that his view of participation was incomplete. In the Parmenides and Sophist he joined participation with exemplarity and efficiency.


Aristotle On Genus And Differentia In The Topics And Categories, Herbert Granger Aug 1983

Aristotle On Genus And Differentia In The Topics And Categories, Herbert Granger

The Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy Newsletter

Each of Aristotle's early works, the Topics and the Categories, provides important evidence for Aristotle's holding two accounts of the nature of genus and differentia. In one account genus and differentia are radically distinct in nature. In the other they are much the same. In this paper I make a case for Aristotle holding each account, suggest why he adopts them, and consider which of the two is the earlier one.


Aristotle On Women, Francis Sparshott Aug 1983

Aristotle On Women, Francis Sparshott

The Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy Newsletter

Sex differentiation is a pervasive and striking feature of the animal world, of which humans form a part. Patriarchy and role differentiation between men and women are pervasive phenomena in human societies. Aristotle is not about to re-design the world. But these phenomena are explained and justified at the economic level, and that is not where human values lie. At the higher level of civilized life, the differentiation becomes anomalous. Aristotle never shows how the anomaly is to be overcome. This is partly because the account of the homestead and the treatment of the city as such are not made ...


Review: The Guide To Practical Pastoring, Paul R. Fink May 1983

Review: The Guide To Practical Pastoring, Paul R. Fink

SOR Faculty Publications and Presentations

No abstract provided.


Sagp Newsletter 1983.1, Anthony Preus Feb 1983

Sagp Newsletter 1983.1, Anthony Preus

The Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy Newsletter

Programs of the Society with the Pacific and Western Divisions of the American Philosophical Association, March and April 1983.


Towards An Understanding Of De Anima 432a1: Aristotle's Analogy Between The Soul And The Hand, Sarah J. Shorten Jan 1983

Towards An Understanding Of De Anima 432a1: Aristotle's Analogy Between The Soul And The Hand, Sarah J. Shorten

The Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy Newsletter

Construing cognitive processes as life-functions of animals enable him to suggest the view that some of the problems of 'psycho-physical dualism' and 'facts of consciousness' may be philosophical creations after all.


On Natural And Unnatural Arts, Jerry Clegg Jan 1983

On Natural And Unnatural Arts, Jerry Clegg

The Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy Newsletter

The analogy between art and nature is basic in Aristotle's work, but he keeps it from degenerating into an identity. We explore the differences between artificial and natural processes.


Aristotle's Philosophical Principles Of Mathematics, Hippocrates George Apostle Jan 1983

Aristotle's Philosophical Principles Of Mathematics, Hippocrates George Apostle

The Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy Newsletter

No abstract provided.