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Full-Text Articles in Philosophy

A Social Philosophy Of William Carlos Williams, Kate L. Koelle May 1957

A Social Philosophy Of William Carlos Williams, Kate L. Koelle

Philosophy ETDs

What this thesis seeks to clarify is how William Carlos Williams as a poet and short story writer feels about, and speaks for, his fellow men. A poet makes words out of his feelings. The feelings determine what the words will be.


Philosophy Of The Natural Moral Law, Oliver Hightower Apr 1957

Philosophy Of The Natural Moral Law, Oliver Hightower

Philosophy Undergraduate Theses

In order to understand the problem of the natural law as it confronts us today, and to arrive at any solution or conclusion to this problem, one must first understand the essence of the natural law. Jacques Maritain describes the natural law as "an order or a disposition which human reason can discover and according to which the human will must act in order to attune itself to the necessary ends or the human being."

And, since all law had a religious character, in primitive cultures law was entrusted to priests ad religious judges. However, man soon realized that human ...


A Critique Of Psychoanalysis In The Light Of Thomistic Philosophy, John Courtney Apr 1957

A Critique Of Psychoanalysis In The Light Of Thomistic Philosophy, John Courtney

Philosophy Undergraduate Theses

Ancient Greek Philosophy was concerned primarily with external nature, and it is for the most part naturalistic (the view that all facts have only natural causes and natural significance) and hylozastic (the opinion that all things are in some degree alive). The philosophers of this period had two problems: 1. that of substance; 2. that of change. Philosophers of the Milesian school; Thasles, Anaximander, Anaximenes, and the Pythagorians deal almost exclusively with these problems. Heraclitus bases his psychology on his theory of the universe holding that the controlling element in man in the soul (fire), and man must subordinate himself ...


The Position Of The Scholastic In The Twentieth Century, Edward Stupca Apr 1957

The Position Of The Scholastic In The Twentieth Century, Edward Stupca

Philosophy Undergraduate Theses

Scholastic Philosophy has ’’emerged once more into the philosophical arena and it has forced recognition from its adversaries." It is no longer studied as a system of thought that "was", but a system of thought that "is". The modern mind, after groping about for truth in the materialism of Locke and Hume, in the idealism of Hegel, in the agnosticism of Kant and Spenser, is n o w ready to investigate the tenets of Aristotle and Thomas, provided the latter are presented to it intelligibly.

Two external reasons are given for this emergence of the philosophy of the Schoolmen, and ...


A Code Of Medical Ethics, James Reynolds Apr 1957

A Code Of Medical Ethics, James Reynolds

Philosophy Undergraduate Theses

From the beginning of time man has realized that he has been endowed with a special gift, that of freedom of choice or free will. But upon reflection or examination of that free will man sees that there are many things that he should do and others that he should not do. In arriving at this man sees that there is something basic in acting this way. This "basicness" is morals or that code of principles and rules to be followed to do good and avoid evil. Morals are not concerned with irrational being since its primary objective is human ...


An Economic Theory Of Scholastic Philosophy, Thomas O'Donnell Apr 1957

An Economic Theory Of Scholastic Philosophy, Thomas O'Donnell

Philosophy Undergraduate Theses

Two contrary schools of economic thought have dominated the modern scene, each of which, in its own way, has occasioned the need for a program of social reform. One considers the ownership of private property as an absolute right, founded ultimately in prescriptions in positive law, to be exercised on behalf of the individual self-interest.

The other condemns any ownership of private property as injurious to the inevitable advance toward the property-less, classless utopia. Its metaphysics is the basis for the official policy of a large part of the world. The object of this work is to briefly sketch the ...


Kierkegaard And Belief , James Joseph Dagenais Jan 1957

Kierkegaard And Belief , James Joseph Dagenais

Master's Theses

No abstract provided.


A Critical Evaluation Of The Epistemology Of William Pepperell Montague , John Joseph Monahan Jan 1957

A Critical Evaluation Of The Epistemology Of William Pepperell Montague , John Joseph Monahan

Master's Theses

No abstract provided.


The Notion Of Personal Communication In The Philosophy Of Gabriel Marcel , Martha Ethelyn Williams Jan 1957

The Notion Of Personal Communication In The Philosophy Of Gabriel Marcel , Martha Ethelyn Williams

Master's Theses

No abstract provided.


A Recent Controversy On The Common Good , James Lee Anderson Jan 1957

A Recent Controversy On The Common Good , James Lee Anderson

Master's Theses

No abstract provided.


Sense Memory According To St. Thomas , Algimantas Jurgis Kezys Jan 1957

Sense Memory According To St. Thomas , Algimantas Jurgis Kezys

Master's Theses

No abstract provided.


Scientific Method In Aristotle's De Caelo, I, I-Ii, Vi , James Francis Mccue Jan 1957

Scientific Method In Aristotle's De Caelo, I, I-Ii, Vi , James Francis Mccue

Master's Theses

No abstract provided.


Toynbee's Idea Of Etherialization As A Criterion Of Progress, Milton De Verne Hunnex Jan 1957

Toynbee's Idea Of Etherialization As A Criterion Of Progress, Milton De Verne Hunnex

Doctoral Dissertations (20th Century)

Few ideals characterize the spirit of the West as does the ideal of progress. Indeed, so closely allied to the rise of the West has been the ideal of progress that doubts about it cast a shadow on the destiny of the West itself.

These doubts have arisen. No longer does belief in progress command the prestige it once enjoyed. The assurance that "civilization has moved, is moving, and will continue to move in a desirable direction" is essentially bankrupt. In the eyes of the British historian, Arnold J. Toynbee, it is a "fallaciously comfortable doctrine," a facile belief "that ...