Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Philosophy Commons

Open Access. Powered by Scholars. Published by Universities.®

Articles 1 - 18 of 18

Full-Text Articles in Philosophy

Left-Libertarianism As A Promising Form Of Liberal Egalitarianism, Peter Vallentyne Jan 2009

Left-Libertarianism As A Promising Form Of Liberal Egalitarianism, Peter Vallentyne

Philosophic Exchange

Left libertarianism is a theory of justice that is committed to full self-ownership and to an egalitarian sharing of the value of natural resources. It is, I shall suggest, a promising way of capturing the liberal egalitarian values of liberty, security, equality, and prosperity.


Why Care About Liberty?, Jan Narveson Dec 2008

Why Care About Liberty?, Jan Narveson

Philosophic Exchange

This is the age of the welfare state. The general assumption is that something is amiss if governments do not provide benefits to its people. Since these benefits are funded by coercive taxation, this implies that those who are taxed are morally required to pay for benefits for others. This paper argues that this assumption is mistaken. Like the founders of the American republic, I argue that government should protect individual liberty, not provide benefits to the needy.


Preemption, Prevention And Predation: Why The Bush Strategy Is Dangerous, Henry Shue Dec 2005

Preemption, Prevention And Predation: Why The Bush Strategy Is Dangerous, Henry Shue

Philosophic Exchange

In September of 2002, the administration of President George W. Bush announced its policy of preemption. This policy is actually equivalent to a policy of preventive war. The principal difficulty with this policy is that it will incite fear in governments who would not otherwise attack us, and thereby incite them to hostile action. Thus the policy actually makes the world a more dangerous place.


On Judging Epistemic Credibility: Is Social Identity Relevant?, Linda Martin Alcoff Jan 1999

On Judging Epistemic Credibility: Is Social Identity Relevant?, Linda Martin Alcoff

Philosophic Exchange

On what basis should we make an epistemic assessment of another’s authority to impart knowledge? Is social identity a legitimate feature to take into account when assessing epistemic reliability? This paper argues that, in some cases, social identity is a relevant feature to take into account in assessing a person’s credibility.


Cosmopolitanism, Universalism And Particularism In An Age Of Nationalism And Multiculturalism, Kai Nielsen Jan 1999

Cosmopolitanism, Universalism And Particularism In An Age Of Nationalism And Multiculturalism, Kai Nielsen

Philosophic Exchange

The objectivity of morality is achieved by the coherentist method of appealing to considered convictions in wide reflective equilibrium. This method yields a conception of morality that is at once universalistic and particularistic. It follows that morality must be cosmopolitan, but also accept a liberal nationalism, at least under certain circumstances. This paper concludes by applying these ideas to the issues of Quebec nationalism and the status of African-Americans in the United States.


Preference By Race Is Neither Just Nor Wise, Carl Cohen Jan 1998

Preference By Race Is Neither Just Nor Wise, Carl Cohen

Philosophic Exchange

This paper argues that preference by race is neither just nor wise. The paper argues that, as it was originally intended, the policy of affirmative action does not involve preference by race, nor is such a system justified.


The Precarious Sovereignty Of Rights, Hugo Adam Bedau Jan 1997

The Precarious Sovereignty Of Rights, Hugo Adam Bedau

Philosophic Exchange

This paper argues that the typical theory of human rights is both defective and misleading. It is misleading insofar as the rights that these theories generate are not the powerful moral swords and shields that their advocates take them to be. It is defective insofar as it fails to confront the chief sources of trouble for theories of rights. In sum, rights do not have the finality in human affairs that is often claimed for them.


Sex And Consequences: World Population Growth Vs. Reproductive Rights, Margaret P. Battin Jan 1997

Sex And Consequences: World Population Growth Vs. Reproductive Rights, Margaret P. Battin

Philosophic Exchange

Conflict between concern over global population growth and concern for reproductive rights is intense. In this paper I explore how developments in reproductive technology, present and future, may provide a solution to this conflict – one which promises both a significant drop in population growth and the fullest protection of reproductive rights and preferences.


Women, Welfare, And A Public Ethic Of Care, Eva Feder Kittay Jan 1997

Women, Welfare, And A Public Ethic Of Care, Eva Feder Kittay

Philosophic Exchange

Welfare is not only a poverty issue, it is a woman’s issue. We need to formulate a foundation of the political will to shape and support a welfare policy that can serve women raising families without stigmatizing them in the process. The paper attempts to formulate such a foundation.


Political Responsibility And Resistance To Civil Government, David Lyons Jan 1996

Political Responsibility And Resistance To Civil Government, David Lyons

Philosophic Exchange

This paper has two aims. One is to gain a clearer view of Thoreau’s ideas about political responsibility, especially what I shall call individual accountability, or the duty to address political wrongs; for I believe that the common understanding of Thoreau’s position is inaccurate. Another aim is to suggest and to encourage discussion of a broader conception of political responsibility – a conception capable of supporting a duty of disobedience in view of social wrongs.


Resources And Environmental Policy, Jan Narveson Jan 1994

Resources And Environmental Policy, Jan Narveson

Philosophic Exchange

Resources for people are not finite. There are no global shortages of anything that we have to worry about, nothing requiring the imposition of extra-market controls.


Whose Patient Am I, Anyway? How New Economic Threats To Continuity Of Care Can Undermine The Doctor / Patient Relationship, Samuel Gorovitz Jan 1994

Whose Patient Am I, Anyway? How New Economic Threats To Continuity Of Care Can Undermine The Doctor / Patient Relationship, Samuel Gorovitz

Philosophic Exchange

New structures for the financing and delivery of health care and serious efforts to control costs all create tensions in the relationship between doctors and patients and heighten the need for clarification of that relationship. We all want to maintain the traditional sense of a personal, caring, trusting relationship between doctor and patient. However, economic incursions into that relationship threaten to make it a thing of the past. This paper explores these issues.


Response To Professor Marshall Cohen, Graham Hughes Jan 1970

Response To Professor Marshall Cohen, Graham Hughes

Philosophic Exchange

At trial, a civil disobedient may appeal to his reasonable belief in the unconstitutionality of the law that he violated. However, he cannot appeal to any technical difficulties that would require him to lie about his performance of the act in question, or about the role of his conscience in motivating his action.


Civil Disobedience In A Constitutional Democracy, Marshall Cohen Jan 1970

Civil Disobedience In A Constitutional Democracy, Marshall Cohen

Philosophic Exchange

Civil disobedience is an action that is intended to appeal to the public, to show that they have violated principles that they otherwise generally accept. This is why acts of civil disobedience must be public acts. Acts of civil disobedience cannot involve violence to persons, for that might provoke fear, which undermines the public’s ability to listen to the appeal. The civil disobedient accepts his punishment in order to demonstrate his commitment to the rule of law, and also to demonstrate the seriousness of his commitment to the principles that have been violated by the public.


Remarks On Violence And Paying The Penalty, Kai Nielsen Jan 1970

Remarks On Violence And Paying The Penalty, Kai Nielsen

Philosophic Exchange

The civil disobedient need not accept his punishment in order to demonstrate his commitment to the rule of law, and in some circumstances it would be inappropriate to do so. The use of violence is justified when and only when the pain, suffering, and injustice that we overcome thereby outweighs the pain, suffering and injustice that results from our actions. There have been circumstances in recent history in which, it is plausible to believe, these conditions were met.


From The Platitudinous To The Absurd, Sidney Hook Jan 1970

From The Platitudinous To The Absurd, Sidney Hook

Philosophic Exchange

Henry Aiken has misrepresented the history of the university, and the historical context of this debate. The university should be depoliticized in order to protect academic freedom.


The Academy Is Political, Fred F. Harcleroad Jan 1970

The Academy Is Political, Fred F. Harcleroad

Philosophic Exchange

The university is political as a matter of fact, and the people who hold the power are the people who have the money and fund the university. However, Henry Aiken is wrong about the history of General Education. It was not created for ideological purposes.


Can American Universities Be Depoliticized, Henry David Aiken Jan 1970

Can American Universities Be Depoliticized, Henry David Aiken

Philosophic Exchange

Every institution in society is involved in politics, and the university is no exception. So the university cannot be depoliticized. The question is how, and to what ends the university should be involved in politics. The answer is determined by the task of the university, which is to educate men and women for life in a free society. This has some specific political implications.