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Full-Text Articles in Philosophy

Pragmatism In Philosophy: The Hidden Alternative, Simon Blackburn Sep 2011

Pragmatism In Philosophy: The Hidden Alternative, Simon Blackburn

Philosophic Exchange

This paper contrasts two ways of understanding the function of human thought and language. According to representationalism, the function of thought and language is to refer to entities in the world and assert truths about them. By contrast, pragmatism seeks to understand the function of thought and language without any such appeal, at the most fundamental level, to the concepts of truth or reference.


Structuralism, Anti-Structuralism And Objectivity, Derk Pereboom Dec 2010

Structuralism, Anti-Structuralism And Objectivity, Derk Pereboom

Philosophic Exchange

Structuralist theories describe the entities in their domains solely in terms of relations, while also claiming to be complete theories of the entities in question. Leibniz and Kant insist that no structuralist theory can be a complete theory. Kant believes that the knowledge afforded by structuralist theories is sufficient. However, Jacques Derrida is skeptical of the sufficiency of structuralist theories for stable knowledge of any kind.


One Is Not Born But Becomes A Person: The Importance Of Philosophical Mothering, Jennifer Whiting Jan 2006

One Is Not Born But Becomes A Person: The Importance Of Philosophical Mothering, Jennifer Whiting

Philosophic Exchange

Annette Baier is my philosophical foremother. This paper examines Baier’s views on such topics as personal identity and philosophical methodology. It also examines the idea of motherhood, and the various forms that it takes.


Meaning In Life Without Free Will, Derk Pereboom Jan 2003

Meaning In Life Without Free Will, Derk Pereboom

Philosophic Exchange

Even if determinism precludes responsibility and accountability, it does not eliminate everything that we deem valuable. This paper argues that life can be meaningful even if we do not have free will.


Borges’S Two Refutations Of Time, James Van Cleve Jan 2001

Borges’S Two Refutations Of Time, James Van Cleve

Philosophic Exchange

Jorge Luis Borges offers two proofs of the unreality of time. One of these is based on the idealism of Berkeley. The other is based on Leibniz’s principle of the identity of indiscernibles. Though the logic of both arguments is valid, neither of them is fully compelling in its premises.


Understanding The Human World: Structure, Instruction And Deconstruction, Peter Caws Jan 1999

Understanding The Human World: Structure, Instruction And Deconstruction, Peter Caws

Philosophic Exchange

This paper offers an account of the emergence of the human from the natural, for the species and for the individual. I show how human sciences are possible, and suggest some strategies for change based on the understanding that the human sciences provide.


Luck And The Enigmas Of Fate, Nicholas Rescher Jan 1994

Luck And The Enigmas Of Fate, Nicholas Rescher

Philosophic Exchange

Luck is a formidable and ubiquitous factor in human life as we know it. It is a rogue force that prevents human life from being fully domesticated to rational management. This paper explores the nature of luck and its role in human life.


Is 'True Philosophy" Like True Art?, Kai Nielsen Jan 1994

Is 'True Philosophy" Like True Art?, Kai Nielsen

Philosophic Exchange

The question “What is philosophy?” is itself a contentious philosophical question. Some philosophers claim that other philosophers misunderstand the very point and purpose of philosophy. This paper explores several prominent conceptions of philosophy.


A Reckoning Of Sorts On The Prospects Of Moral Philosophy, Joseph Margolis Jan 1994

A Reckoning Of Sorts On The Prospects Of Moral Philosophy, Joseph Margolis

Philosophic Exchange

Western philosophy has tended to distinguish between the use of our cognitive powers in theoretical and practical matters. Moreover, Western philosophy has persuaded itself that whatever is valid in human judgment depends upon and implicates necessary invariances. These assumptions are manifested and developed, most prominently, in Aristotle and Kant. This paper argues against both of these assumptions of the Western philosophical tradition.


Polar Terms And Interdependent Concepts, Marcus G. Singer Jan 1990

Polar Terms And Interdependent Concepts, Marcus G. Singer

Philosophic Exchange

The notion of polarity, of polar terms and concepts, has been extensively used in the history of philosophy. However, there has never been a careful analysis or elucidation of the very concept of polarity itself. This paper aims to provide just such an elucidation of the concept of polarity.