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Full-Text Articles in Philosophy

When Doctors Kill Patients: Vital Organ Transplants, Ted A. Warfield Jan 2002

When Doctors Kill Patients: Vital Organ Transplants, Ted A. Warfield

Philosophic Exchange

This paper attempts to discern exactly what is happening in some medical situations involving patients who are, in different ways, near death. In order to arrive at a correct moral evaluation of these practices, it is necessary to begin with a careful analysis of exactly what is happening, and then proceed to moral evaluation. This paper argues that declarations of death in many vital organ transplants are unjustified. Thus, probably there are killings occurring in these cases. However, there is no reason to think that these killings are morally unacceptable.


The Plurality Of Consciousness, William G. Lycan Jan 2002

The Plurality Of Consciousness, William G. Lycan

Philosophic Exchange

There are many, distinct phenomena that have gone under the name “consciousness,” and there are many corresponding problems that have all been labeled “the problem of consciousness.” This paper distinguishes several of these distinct problems of consciousness, and proposes solutions to each of them.


The ‘Faith’ Of An Atheist, Louise Antony Jan 2002

The ‘Faith’ Of An Atheist, Louise Antony

Philosophic Exchange

For many religious believers, belief in God is as fundamental as my belief in my own body. That is because the believer thinks that belief in God is a necessary condition for living a meaningful life. This paper argues that belief in God is not necessary for living a meaningful life. Morality, meaning, and love are all independent of God. All that is required for a meaningful life is a sustaining belief that humankind is worth something. This kind of faith is available to an atheist.


Why Obey The Laws Of Logic?, Robert J. Fogelin Jan 2002

Why Obey The Laws Of Logic?, Robert J. Fogelin

Philosophic Exchange

The status of the law of noncontradiction is the ultimate battleground on which the traditional forces of rationalism and anti-rationalism have met. This conflict is the topic of this essay. People who reject the law of noncontradiction obliterate any significant difference between speech acts of asserting and denying. In doing so, they deprive themselves of the significant use of their own speech acts. Thus they are self-silencers. This is Aristotle’s “negative demonstration” of the law of noncontradiction, and I find it entirely persuasive.