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Journal

Philosophic Exchange

1977

Articles 1 - 6 of 6

Full-Text Articles in Philosophy

Writing As A Problem For Literary Criticism And Philosophical Hermeneutics, Paul Ricoeur Jan 1977

Writing As A Problem For Literary Criticism And Philosophical Hermeneutics, Paul Ricoeur

Philosophic Exchange

To the extent that hermeneutics is a text-oriented interpretation, and that texts are among other things instances of written language, no interpretation theory is possible that does not come to grips with the problem of writing. Therefore the purpose of this essay is twofold. I want first to show that the transition from speaking to writing has its conditions of possibility in the structures of discourse itself, then to connect the kind of intentional exteriorization which writing exhibits to a central problem of hermeneutics, that of distanciation. This same concept of exteriority, which in the first part of this paper ...


Some Remarks About Rationality, Max Black Jan 1977

Some Remarks About Rationality, Max Black

Philosophic Exchange

This article is an abbreviated version of a talk titled "The Limitations of Rationality."


In Defense Of Introspection, Anthony Quinton Jan 1977

In Defense Of Introspection, Anthony Quinton

Philosophic Exchange

The author defends the conviction that we have direct knowledge or awareness of our own states of mind, that we do not have to observe our own speech and behavior in order to find out whether we are angry or elated or what we believe or hope or fear, and that, furthermore, we do often come to know, or at least reasonably to believe, such things about ourselves.


The Strengths And Limits Of The Theory Of Retributive Punishment, Kurt Baier Jan 1977

The Strengths And Limits Of The Theory Of Retributive Punishment, Kurt Baier

Philosophic Exchange

In textbooks on punishment one usually finds four major "theories" or "justifications" of punishment: (1) the retributive, (2) the deterrence, (3) the reform or rehabilitation, and ( 4) the incapacitation or social defense, theories.1 They are usually offered as rival theories of the proper (primary) purpose or function of punishment.2 And it is generally assumed that the general practice of punishing people and individual acts of punishment are morally justified if and only if, and to the extent that, they serve that purpose or perform that function.


Sentence Meaning And Illocutionary Act Potential, William P. Alston Jan 1977

Sentence Meaning And Illocutionary Act Potential, William P. Alston

Philosophic Exchange

The idea that illocutionary-act-potential (IAP) is the key to linguistic meaning is still in a rather undeveloped state. Since I introduced the suggestion in the early sixties it has not received much elaboration. To be sure, it is the conception of sentence-meaning put forward in John Searle's book Speech Acts,2 but although Searle in that book has many interesting things to say on many topics, he does not measurably advance the development of an account of linguistic meaning in terms of illocutionary acts. (I also have many reservations about the details of his treatment.)

I am currently engaged ...


Truth And Convention In Morality, Richard Taylor Jan 1977

Truth And Convention In Morality, Richard Taylor

Philosophic Exchange

The author considers the question of whether there is one true or valid set of moral principles, or whether all ethics are the distillation of our inherited codes and prohibitions.