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Full-Text Articles in Philosophy

Comments On Sun Woo Lee’S “Ubi As Regular Payment: Egalitarian Safeguard Or Dose Of Paternalism?, Brian Kim Feb 2019

Comments On Sun Woo Lee’S “Ubi As Regular Payment: Egalitarian Safeguard Or Dose Of Paternalism?, Brian Kim

Puget Sound Undergraduate Philosophy Conference

“UBI as Regular Payment: Egalitarian Safeguard or Dose of Paternalism?”

By Sun Woo Lee (Stanford University)

Comments by Brian Kim

Chair: Guillermo Ruiz


Comments On Angela Lee’S “Statistical Mechanics And The Past Hypothesis”, Emory Brigden Feb 2019

Comments On Angela Lee’S “Statistical Mechanics And The Past Hypothesis”, Emory Brigden

Puget Sound Undergraduate Philosophy Conference

“Statstcal Mechanics and the Past Hypothesis”

By Angela Lee (University of California, Berkeley)

Comments by Emory Brigden

Chair: James Conley


Response To “Truth In The Falsification Of Ai”, August Malueg Feb 2019

Response To “Truth In The Falsification Of Ai”, August Malueg

Puget Sound Undergraduate Philosophy Conference

12:00-12:50: “The Truth in the Falsifcaton of Artfcial Intelligence”

By Mariah Jacobs (Pacifc University)

Comments by August Malueg

Chair: Thalia Barr-Malec


The Truth In The Falsification Of Artificial Intelligence, Mariah Jacobs Feb 2019

The Truth In The Falsification Of Artificial Intelligence, Mariah Jacobs

Puget Sound Undergraduate Philosophy Conference

The influence Karl Popper’s falsificationist model has had on the scientific method and the demarcation problem is troublesome for the field of artificial intelligence (AI). According to Popper, the falsifiability of a hypothesis is a necessary condition for its scientific validity. Because the falsificationist model has been formative in the development of modern philosophy of science, it has become the primary way in which we demarcate the scientific from the non-scientific. However, as a consequence of our current, limited understanding of mental properties—such as intelligence, thought, and personal identity—I argue that it is unclear whether hypotheses concerning ...


Mt. Olympus, Gotham City, And Metropolis: The Power Of Heroism In Shaping Cultures And Futures, Julia French Feb 2019

Mt. Olympus, Gotham City, And Metropolis: The Power Of Heroism In Shaping Cultures And Futures, Julia French

Puget Sound Undergraduate Philosophy Conference

Stories reflect the cultures they arise from and their heroes help direct the mindset of future generations. From ancient Greece to modern America, the human creativity behind these worlds has allowed us to promote new beliefs and virtues through the adventures of our heroes. “Mt. Olympus, Gotham City, and Metropolis” explores how mythological heroism has changed over time and now conflicts with itself as religious and secular story-tellers alike wrestle with the teleological foundation within heroism.

In America for instance, Batman and Superman are the pillars of our modern pantheon, and their recent movie Batman v. Superman: Dawn of Justice ...


A Response To Julia French’S “Mt. Olympus, Gotham City And The Metropolis: The Power Of Heroism, In Shaping Cultures And Futures”, Sam Place Feb 2019

A Response To Julia French’S “Mt. Olympus, Gotham City And The Metropolis: The Power Of Heroism, In Shaping Cultures And Futures”, Sam Place

Puget Sound Undergraduate Philosophy Conference

11:00-11:50: “Mt. Olympus, Gotham City, and Metropolis: The Power of Heroism in Shaping Cultures and Futures”

By Julia French (University of Notre Dame)

Comments by Sam Place

Chair: Madilyn Ivey


Comments On William Perrin’S “The Failure Of Hope As An Epistemic Standard”, Colleen Hanson Feb 2019

Comments On William Perrin’S “The Failure Of Hope As An Epistemic Standard”, Colleen Hanson

Puget Sound Undergraduate Philosophy Conference

10:00-10:50: “The Failure of Hope as an Epistemic Standard”

By William Perrin (Pepperdine University)

Comments by Colleen Hanson

Chair: Samantha Lilly


The Failure Of Hope As An Epistemic Standard, William Perrin Feb 2019

The Failure Of Hope As An Epistemic Standard, William Perrin

Puget Sound Undergraduate Philosophy Conference

Jonathan Weinberg (2007) attempted to show how to challenge intuitions empirically, without risking skepticism. In this paper, I raise several objections to his project. In the first section I will clarify and explain several terms. Specifically, what I mean when I use intuition in this paper and what Weinberg means by hopefulness. Clarification of these terms is essential to this paper, as both intuition and hopefulness have become somewhat muddled terms in recent literature. In the second section I will reconstruct Weinberg’s argument against philosophers’ appeals to intuition. Weinberg aims to show that philosophers’ appeals to intuitions are epistemically ...


Confucian Role Ethics: Issues Of Naming, Translation, And Interpretation, Sarah Mattice Jan 2019

Confucian Role Ethics: Issues Of Naming, Translation, And Interpretation, Sarah Mattice

Showcase of Faculty Scholarly & Creative Activity

This chapter explores the arguments behind considering Confucian ethics as a kind of "role ethics", as articulated by Roger Ames and others. I see at least three sets of concerns that animate the reasoning behind Confucian role ethics: naming, translation, and interpretation. In terms of naming, I discuss this project as an example of zhengming 正名, or proper naming, which is a common Confucian ethical project. Confucian thinkers are often preoccupied with appropriate categorization, one species of which is naming. The naming of Confucian ethics as role ethics, I argue, is not only consistent with but is situated in a ...


Comments “Listening To Music: A Philosophical Account”, Sammy Jones Jan 2019

Comments “Listening To Music: A Philosophical Account”, Sammy Jones

Puget Sound Undergraduate Philosophy Conference

3:30-4:20: “Listening to Music: A Philosophical Account”

By Paskalina Bourbon (Pomona College)

Comments by Sammy Jones

Chair: Colleen Hanson


Aristotle’S Functonalism: Psyche’S Relevance To Contemporary Philosophy Of Mind, Cassie Finley Jan 2019

Aristotle’S Functonalism: Psyche’S Relevance To Contemporary Philosophy Of Mind, Cassie Finley

Puget Sound Undergraduate Philosophy Conference

While functionalism often attributes its roots to Aristotle’s On the Soul, contemporary philosophers of mind have left behind crucial features of Aristotle’s philosophy by losing his distinction between mind and soul. I propose a revision to our present concept of mind, instead situating it as an aspect of the Aristotelian concept of soul, which allows for a more robust account of functionalism that encompasses the entirety of the human being as a system of demonstrative, functional capacities. I argue that Aristotle’s applied theory of the nature of souls offers greater fecundity to discourse in philosophy of mind ...


A Response To Cassie Finley’S ‘Aristotle’S Functionalism’, Holden Chen Jan 2019

A Response To Cassie Finley’S ‘Aristotle’S Functionalism’, Holden Chen

Puget Sound Undergraduate Philosophy Conference

A Response to Cassie Finley’s ‘Aristotle’s Functionalism’

2:30-3:20: “Aristotle’s Functonalism: Psyche’s Relevance to Contemporary Philosophy of Mind ” By Cassie Finley (Pacifc University)

Comments by Holden Chen

Chair: Sienna Murphy


A Sorry State Of Affairs: Chinese Arrivants, Indigenous Hosts, And Settler Colonial Apologies, Angie Wong Jan 2019

A Sorry State Of Affairs: Chinese Arrivants, Indigenous Hosts, And Settler Colonial Apologies, Angie Wong

The Canadian Society for Study of Practical Ethics / Société Canadienne Pour L'étude De L'éthique Appliquée — SCEEA

We make and give gestures of apology every day, Canadians doubly so. Yet, grand acts of apology for more serious and sustained matters, such as historical and contemporary injustice against those with the least amount of social power, require far more ethical consideration and transformation than simply saying, “I am sorry.” Since the early 2000s, several political parties of the Canadian government have taken up the trend of making a spectacle out of national apologies to historically oppressed groups. Engaging with the concept of the settler colonial triad to theorize the histories of early Chinese arrivants’ experience, this work departs ...


Toward An Interdependent Conception Of The Self: Implications For Canadian Policy Reform, Laila Khoshkar Jan 2019

Toward An Interdependent Conception Of The Self: Implications For Canadian Policy Reform, Laila Khoshkar

The Canadian Society for Study of Practical Ethics / Société Canadienne Pour L'étude De L'éthique Appliquée — SCEEA

This paper explores three ways of conceptualising the self and the implications of these various conceptions on mental health and the treatment of mental illness. First, I explicate the egocentric view, which is predominantly assumed by Canadian doctors, psychiatrists, and psychologists. Second, I consider an ecocentric approach adopted by some traditional Inuit people. Third, I describe a sociocentric conception, typically upheld by Syrians. I argue that, in order to treat mental disorders in Syrian refugees in Canada more appropriately and effectively, Canadian healthcare providers must avoid imposing the egocentric view and seek to understand their patients’ mental health in terms ...


Opposites, Bruce Morito Jan 2019

Opposites, Bruce Morito

The Canadian Society for Study of Practical Ethics / Société Canadienne Pour L'étude De L'éthique Appliquée — SCEEA

Irony appears to be deeply rooted in the practice of ethics. Attempts to prescribe morally obligatory duties, and to will morally justified actions, often bring about the opposite of their intended result. Imposing imperatives, e.g., justice, in efforts to produce fair, equitable, caring societies, inadvertently plants seeds of failure. The imposition of moral imperatives increasingly appears to generate polarities rather than unities, as cases of abortion, euthanasia, reactions to liberal immigration, and environmental protection policies have illustrated. Imposed imperatives generate counter imperatives and counterclaims of having justice on “our” side. I attempt here to explain this phenomenon and, in ...


Decolonization: Resolving The Crisis In Indigenous Peoples’ Health Care, Sandra Tomsons Jan 2019

Decolonization: Resolving The Crisis In Indigenous Peoples’ Health Care, Sandra Tomsons

The Canadian Society for Study of Practical Ethics / Société Canadienne Pour L'étude De L'éthique Appliquée — SCEEA

When colonialism is invisible to the colonizer/settler, that one inevitably misdiagnoses the so-called “Aboriginal problem”. So, unsurprisingly, any proposed solution fails. Problems resulting from colonialism, including the health crisis in Indigenous communities, are so visible Canada cannot deny seeing them. Yet, the voices of Indigenous leaders, community workers, and scholars insisting Canada address colonialism to solve the problems fall on deaf ears. This paper argues that the justice requirement to address colonialism is not simply based in an Indigenous moral and legal perspective. Canada’s justice foundation is provided by liberal theory, and liberalism supports Indigenous solutions. Colonialism has ...


Moral Agency, Bureaucracy & Nurses: A Qualitative Study, Elisabeth Fortier, David Malloy Jan 2019

Moral Agency, Bureaucracy & Nurses: A Qualitative Study, Elisabeth Fortier, David Malloy

The Canadian Society for Study of Practical Ethics / Société Canadienne Pour L'étude De L'éthique Appliquée — SCEEA

This research explores moral agency among a group of nurses in an urban hospital located in a Western Canadian province. For this study, six Nurses were recruited and their stories describe various limitations within the culture of the healthcare system appears to constrict moral agency and possibly lead to moral distress among nurses. Moral agency seems to be influenced by hierarchy and taking initiatives, time/workload, and the “politics of healthcare”. Nurses also shared experiences of resiliency in facing moral dilemmas in the nursing profession. In conclusion, nurses appear to juggle conflicting priorities between providing quality care to patients and ...


Dare To Know By Thyself (Sapere Aude): The Legacy Of The Enlightenment And Post Enlightenment In Working-Class Adult Education, Maria A. Vetter Jan 2019

Dare To Know By Thyself (Sapere Aude): The Legacy Of The Enlightenment And Post Enlightenment In Working-Class Adult Education, Maria A. Vetter

Adult Education Research Conference

The Enlightenment and Post Enlightenment relationship to working-class adult education is examined in the case of the working class in Chile at the turn of the 20th century.


Is Masculinity A Vice?, Tyler J. Zimmer Nov 2018

Is Masculinity A Vice?, Tyler J. Zimmer

Faculty Research and Creative Activities Symposium

No abstract provided.


Bothsiderism, John P. Casey Nov 2018

Bothsiderism, John P. Casey

Faculty Research and Creative Activities Symposium

No abstract provided.


The Different Kinds, And Effects, Of Stereotypes, Stacey Goguen Nov 2018

The Different Kinds, And Effects, Of Stereotypes, Stacey Goguen

Faculty Research and Creative Activities Symposium

No abstract provided.


"Not A Simple Matter: Rejecting Materialism As A Solution To The Mind-Body Problem", Andrew Coyle, Steve Parchment Dr., Minh Nguyen Dr. Nov 2018

"Not A Simple Matter: Rejecting Materialism As A Solution To The Mind-Body Problem", Andrew Coyle, Steve Parchment Dr., Minh Nguyen Dr.

Posters-at-the-Capitol

"Not a Simple Matter: Rejecting Materialism as a Solution to the Mind-Body Problem"

By Andrew Coyle

Mentored by Dr. Steve Parchment and Dr. Minh Nguyen

Department of History, Philosophy, and Religious Studies Many scholars accept materialism as an adequate solution to the mind-body problem. However, acceptance of materialism creates more problems than it purports to solve. This poster provides a background to the mind-body problem. This poster explores materialism as a potential solution to the mind-body problem. After reviewing materialism, it is rejected as an adequate solution to the mind-body problem. The poster concludes by positing property dualism as an ...


Artificial Intelligence, Personal Identity, And Self-Awareness., Caryn Vandergriff Nov 2018

Artificial Intelligence, Personal Identity, And Self-Awareness., Caryn Vandergriff

Georgia Undergraduate Research Conference (GURC)

In my paper, I will discuss how modern artificial intelligence (AI) may be able to gain self-awareness through a developmental phase. The developmental phase starts at the AI’s creation. The phase is developed and refined the more it interacts with humans. The first section will consist of the history of AI. The history section will include Alan Turing, a computer scientist that introduces the Turing Test, also known as the Imitation Test, which is a test that was created to determine if computer systems could gain intelligence I will also provide a definition of self-awareness, consciousness, and intelligence in ...


Reason Vs. Truth: How The Enlightenment And Romanticism Effected The Victorian Occult, Jessica Brazinski Nov 2018

Reason Vs. Truth: How The Enlightenment And Romanticism Effected The Victorian Occult, Jessica Brazinski

Georgia Undergraduate Research Conference (GURC)

“Reason vs. Truth: How the Enlightenment and Romanticism Effected the Victorian Occult.”

By: Jessica Brazinski

Abstract:

This research project is a historical analysis of occult secret societies and organizations during and soon after the reign of Queen Victoria. In particular, this research focuses on the impact of Romanticism and the Enlightenment on the Victorian occult. By examining the founding myths, practices, and core beliefs of these organizations this study found that Enlightenment, Romanticist, and Neoclassical ideas all played a part in the adoption of foreign ideas into these societies. The Freemasons, for instance, were very much influenced by Enlightenment ideas ...


B-2 Same-Sex Marriage And The Apocalyptic Consciousness Of Seventh-Day Adventism, David Hamstra Oct 2018

B-2 Same-Sex Marriage And The Apocalyptic Consciousness Of Seventh-Day Adventism, David Hamstra

Celebration of Research and Creative Scholarship

Arguments made for and against affirming same-sex marriage in Seventh-day Adventism rely on typical moral background presuppositions about immanent and transcendent goods identified by Charles Taylor in his philosophical genealogy of A Secular Age. Arguments made only in terms of marriage’s immanent goods have the potential to diminish the plausibility of a uniquely Adventist way of imagining the transcendent: apocalyptic consciousness focused on the immanent/imminent restoration of Eden by Jesus Christ following the second coming. Comparing marriage to the this-worldly and next-worldly benefits of divergent Adventist Sabbath-keeping practices foregrounds the availability of immanentized moral presuppositions to make sense ...


2018 Printed Program May 2018

2018 Printed Program

The C. S. Lewis & Friends Colloquium

No abstract provided.


Science, Mental Illness, And Ethics In Friedrich Dürrenmatt’S The Physicists, Niyant Vora Apr 2018

Science, Mental Illness, And Ethics In Friedrich Dürrenmatt’S The Physicists, Niyant Vora

John Wesley Powell Student Research Conference

In 1962, as Cold War tensions approached their peak, Friedrich Dürrenmatt, a Swiss playwright, published his play The Physicists. Two of the most important topics in The Physicists are mental illness and ethical responsibility of scientists. Dürrenmatt’s three main characters: Möbius (a genius), Einstein (a Russian spy), and Newton (an American spy) are all physicists who appropriate the status of mentally ill in order to hide from society inside the Les Cerisiers Sanatorium. Their status as mentally ill acts as a cover up that reveals their different reasons for adapting that status–from Möbius attempt to escape the politics ...


Moral Judgment: Why Should We Judge And Who Has The Right To?, Megan Moulton Apr 2018

Moral Judgment: Why Should We Judge And Who Has The Right To?, Megan Moulton

Carroll College Student Undergraduate Research Festival

In this presentation, I explore the origin of the moral authority to judge another person’s wrong actions through the relationships to those involved in the situation. I also argue that moral authority has an aspect grounded in past experience with similar situations and the ability to understand what it means to be held and to hold another morally responsible. The purpose of defining moral authority and its application is determined to be for the moral growth of the perpetrator, until further development is denied, in which case the possible occurrence of manipulation to stay in relation with the unchanging ...


Commitment In Unconventional Relationships, Sarah Hayden Apr 2018

Commitment In Unconventional Relationships, Sarah Hayden

Carroll College Student Undergraduate Research Festival

This research is the study and comparison of two philosopher couples: Jean-Paul Sartre and Simone de Beauvoir, and John Stuart Mill and Harriet Taylor. Both partnerships exhibit characteristics of an unconventional relationship. Sartre and de Beauvoir had an open relationship, in which both partners were free to commit unlimited adultery. Mill and Taylor were emotionally committed to each other, while Taylor was legally bound to another man. This research examines the individual decisions and consequences of challenging the institution of marriage set by societal norms. With the current growth of unconventional relationships, whether open, homosexual, or interracial, it is especially ...


Science Fiction And Models Of Humanity, Emily Holland Apr 2018

Science Fiction And Models Of Humanity, Emily Holland

Carroll College Student Undergraduate Research Festival

Science Fiction as a literary genre offers a unique platform for social commentary. It presents plausible scientific advancements as a reality, and then uses this possible future to enter the discussion on society’s current model of humanity. One of the first works of Science Fiction, Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein; or The Modern Prometheus, published in 1818, was written in a time overflowing with new scientific theories and advancements. Two such sciences, galvanism and vitalism, aimed to identify the principle of life in the human body. At the same time, pseudo-psychological theories discussed the psychological aspects of what we call ...