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Articles 1 - 7 of 7

Full-Text Articles in Philosophy

The Irrational Appeal Of The Punishment Paradigm: How "Tough On Crime" Subverts Reason And Empathy, Curry Carr Apr 2019

The Irrational Appeal Of The Punishment Paradigm: How "Tough On Crime" Subverts Reason And Empathy, Curry Carr

Student Symposium

This investigation will examine the ways of thinking that facilitated the enactment of harsh sentencing laws in the U.S., with a specific focus on truth in sentencing laws in Illinois. Truth in sentencing laws dictate that people convicted of violent crimes must serve 85%-100% of their sentences, basically eliminating their chances for parole for good behavior. In the 1980s and 1990s almost every state enacted truth in sentencing laws after federal funding was promised to those who do. The implementation of these laws, in some ways, seemed to follow reason, especially when states lowered the requisite time served ...


Greek Music Theory Vs. The Bible, Kearsten M. Kostelnik Apr 2019

Greek Music Theory Vs. The Bible, Kearsten M. Kostelnik

The Research and Scholarship Symposium

The great philosophers of Ancient Greece have been studied in depth and are known throughout society. Famous Greek philosophers and writers, such as Plato and Pythagoras, formulated theories on musical philosophy — it’s purpose, use, dangers, power, and importance in society. Greek philosophy of music heavily influenced early European society’s view and development of music, it only partially supports Biblical views and principles of music and worship. Pythagoras introduces the theory that music is more than just entertainment with his notion of Music of the Spheres but fails to align with the biblical view of stars and planets as ...


A Ludological Perspective On Argument, Michael A. Yong-Set May 2016

A Ludological Perspective On Argument, Michael A. Yong-Set

OSSA Conference Archive

This introductory paper explores a new perspective on argumentation that draws upon the resources of ludology – the critical and academic of study of games qua games. In the Philosophical Investigations, one of the later Wittgenstein’s more mysterious suggestions is that if one understands how games work, then one would be able to understand how natural language works. Similarly, it will be argued that if we look to how games function as games, we will be able to understand how the ‘argument-game’ functions. The epistemic importance of rhetorical argumentation rather than analytic demonstration becomes apparent if we consider ‘argument’ as ...


Reviewing Epistemic Authority, Paige Massey Mar 2014

Reviewing Epistemic Authority, Paige Massey

Seaver College Research And Scholarly Achievement Symposium

Given the relationship between personal autonomy and our various commitments across ideological communities, it is important to understand how to navigate peer disagreement and on which bases we may rationally accept a community leader as an authority in the formation of our beliefs. In her most recent book, Epistemic Authority, Linda Zagzebski develops a theory of rational trust to provide a framework for understanding this complex relationship between autonomy and authority. In my project with Professor Bogardus, we set out to coauthor a scholarly review of Zagzebski's book in light of current epistemological research, with the additional aim to ...


Yes, Safety Is In Danger, Chad Marxen Mar 2014

Yes, Safety Is In Danger, Chad Marxen

Seaver College Research And Scholarly Achievement Symposium

In an essay recently published in this journal (“Is Safety in Danger?”), Fernando Broncano Berrocal defends the safety condition on knowledge from a counterexample proposed by Tomas Bogardus (2012). In this paper, we will define the safety condition, briefly explain the proposed counterexample, and outline Broncano-Berrocal’s defense of the safety condition. We will then raise four objections to Broncano-Berrocal’s defense, four implausible implications of his central claim. In the end, we conclude that Broncano-Berrocal’s defense of the safety condition is unsuccessful, and that the safety condition on knowledge should be rejected.


The Failure Of Certainty: Why Economics Needs Rhetoric, Jerry Petersen May 2013

The Failure Of Certainty: Why Economics Needs Rhetoric, Jerry Petersen

OSSA Conference Archive

Privileging deductive first principles over inductive contingencies, I argue, contributed to the economic meltdown of late and will continue to limit the range of reasonable solutions available to solve entrenched economic problems. I cite Toulmin’s critique of scientific certainty and the rancor over the demise of the ninth planet Pluto to posit a role for rhetoric in making valid claims across all fields of study, calling for more productive uncertainty subject to vigorous argumentation.


What Argumentation (Theory) Can Do For Philosophy In The 21st Century, Henrique Jales Ribeiro May 2013

What Argumentation (Theory) Can Do For Philosophy In The 21st Century, Henrique Jales Ribeiro

OSSA Conference Archive

The author holds that the old theory according to which philosophy is the matrix of argumentation studies must be entirely reviewed currently. He argues that argumentation theory, as an interdisciplinary domain, may start playing, in new terms, the role which ― in the Cartesian tree ― was that of philosophy as the trunk of the different branches of human knowledge, as long as a set of requirements, which he lists, were met.