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Full-Text Articles in Philosophy

The Reproduction Of Life Death [Table Of Contents], Dawne Mccance Jul 2019

The Reproduction Of Life Death [Table Of Contents], Dawne Mccance

Philosophy

Based on archival translations of a soon-to-be-published seminar by Jacques Derrida, The Reproduction of Life Death offers an unprecedented study of Derrida’s engagement with molecular biology and genetics. McCance shows how Derrida ties biological accounts of reproduction to the reproductive program of teaching, challenging an auto-reproductive notion of pedagogy, while also reinterpreting the work of psychoanalysis.

Structured as an itinerary of “three rings,” each departing from and coming back to Nietzsche, Derrida’s seminar ties Jacob’s logocentric account of reproduction to the reproductive program of teaching that characterizes the academic institution, challenging this mode of teaching as auto-reproduction ...


Thinking With Adorno [Table Of Contents], Gerhard Richter Jul 2019

Thinking With Adorno [Table Of Contents], Gerhard Richter

Philosophy

What Theodor W. Adorno says cannot be separated from how he says it, and what he thinks cannot be isolated from how he thinks it. Richter’s book teaches us to think with Adorno—both alongside him and in relation to his diverse contexts and constellations, from aesthetic theory to political critique, from the problem of judgment to the question of how to lead a right life within a wrong one.

Thinking with Adorno’s uncoercive gaze not only means following the fascinating paths of his own work; it also means extending hospitality to the ghostly voices of others. As ...


For The Love Of Psychoanalysis [Table Of Contents], Elizabeth Rottenberg Jun 2019

For The Love Of Psychoanalysis [Table Of Contents], Elizabeth Rottenberg

Philosophy

For the Love of Psychoanalysis is a book about what exceeds or resists calculation—in life and in death. Rottenberg examines what emerges from the difference between psychoanalysis and philosophy.

Part I, “Freuderrida,” announces a non-traditional Freud: a Freud associated not with sexuality, repression, unconsciousness, and symbolization, but with accidents and chance. Looking at accidents both in and of Freud’s writing, Rottenberg elaborates the unexpected insights that both produce and disrupt our received ideas of psychoanalytic theory.

Whereas the close reading of Freud leaves us open to the accidents of psychoanalytic writing, Part II, “Freuderrida,” addresses itself to what ...


The Singular Voice Of Being [Table Of Contents], Andrew Lazella May 2019

The Singular Voice Of Being [Table Of Contents], Andrew Lazella

Philosophy

The Singular Voice of Being reconsiders John Duns Scotus’s well-covered theory of the univocity of being in light of his less explored discussions of ultimate difference. Ultimate difference is a notion introduced by Aristotle and known by the Aristotelian tradition, but one that, the book argues, Scotus radically retrofits to buttress his doctrine of univocity. Ultimate difference for Aristotle meant the last difference in a line of specific differences whereby all the preceding differences would be united into a single substance rather than remain a heapish multiplicity. LaZella argues that Scotus both broadens and deepens the term such that ...


The Need For Autonomy Promoting Sex Education, Mackenzie R. Darling May 2019

The Need For Autonomy Promoting Sex Education, Mackenzie R. Darling

Philosophy

This thesis examines the current state of sex education in the United States and

how our society is failing students by not providing them with the knowledge and tools needed to be fully autonomous and healthy sexual beings. By exploring what it means to be a holistically healthy sexual being, and what is meant by ‘sexual health’ in general, a criterion for a good sex education can be established. This criterion enables a critique of America’s two primary sex education programs in use: Abstinence-Only Sex Education and Comprehensive Sex Education. After fully examining what comprises each, as well as ...


Reoccupy Earth [Table Of Contents], David Wood Apr 2019

Reoccupy Earth [Table Of Contents], David Wood

Philosophy

Habit rules our lives. And yet climate change and the catastrophic future it portends, makes it clear that we cannot go on like this.

Our habits are integral to narratives of the good life, to social norms and expectations, as well as to economic reality. Such shared shapes are vital. Yet while many of our individual habits seem perfectly reasonable, when aggregated together they spell disaster. Beyond consumerism, other forms of life and patterns of dwelling are clearly possible. But how can we get there from here?

Philosophy is about emancipation—from illusions, myths, and oppression. In Reoccupy Earth, the ...


The Mathematical Imagination: On The Origins And Promise Of Critical Theory, Matthew Handelman Mar 2019

The Mathematical Imagination: On The Origins And Promise Of Critical Theory, Matthew Handelman

Philosophy

This book offers an archeology of the undeveloped potential of mathematics for critical theory. As Max Horkheimer and Theodor W. Adorno first conceived of the critical project in the 1930s, critical theory steadfastly opposed the mathematization of thought. Mathematics flattened thought into a dangerous positivism that led reason to the barbarism of World War II. The Mathematical Imagination challenges this narrative, showing how for other German-Jewish thinkers, such as Gershom Scholem, Franz Rosenzweig, and Siegfried Kracauer, mathematics offered metaphors to negotiate the crises of modernity during the Weimar Republic. Influential theories of poetry, messianism, and cultural critique, Handelman shows, borrowed ...


Killing Times [Table Of Contents], David Wills Mar 2019

Killing Times [Table Of Contents], David Wills

Philosophy

Killing Times begins with the deceptively simple observation—made by Jacques Derrida in his seminars on the topic—that the death penalty mechanically interrupts mortal time by preempting the typical mortal experience of not knowing at what precise moment we will die.

Killing Times traces the logic of the death penalty across a range of sites. Starting with the struggles of American courts to articulate what methods of execution constitute “cruel and unusual punishment,” Wills goes on to show the ways that technologies of death have themselves evolved in conjunction with fraught ideas of cruelty and instantaneity, from the guillotine ...


Deep Time, Dark Times [Table Of Contents], David Wood Dec 2018

Deep Time, Dark Times [Table Of Contents], David Wood

Philosophy

The new geological epoch we call the Anthropocene is not just a scientific classification. It marks a radical transformation in the background conditions of life on earth, one taken for granted by much of who we are and what we hope for.

The real-world consequences of climate change bring new significance to some very traditional philosophical questions about reason, agency, responsibility, community, and Man’s place in Nature. The focus is shifting from imagining and promoting the Good Life to the survival of the species. Deep Time, Dark Times challenges us to re-imagine ourselves as a species, taking on a ...


Under Representation [Table Of Contents], David Lloyd Nov 2018

Under Representation [Table Of Contents], David Lloyd

Philosophy

Under Representation shows how the founding texts of aesthetic philosophy ground the racial order of the modern world in our concepts of universality, freedom, and humanity. Late Enlightenment discourse on aesthetic experience proposes a decisive account of the conditions of possibility for universal human subjecthood. The aesthetic forges a powerful “racial regime of representation” whose genealogy runs from Enlightenment thinkers like Kant and Schiller to late Modernist critics like Adorno and Benjamin. For aesthetic philosophy, representation is not just about depiction of diverse humans or inclusion in political or cultural institutions. It is an activity that undergirds the various spheres ...


Openness And Protection: A Philosophical Analysis Of The Placenta's Mediatory Role In Co-­‐Constituting Emergent Intertwined Identities, Marjolein Oele Jul 2017

Openness And Protection: A Philosophical Analysis Of The Placenta's Mediatory Role In Co-­‐Constituting Emergent Intertwined Identities, Marjolein Oele

Philosophy

This paper analyzes the placenta's biological and ontological underpinnings in human affectivity as it is generated. The placenta as medial boundary constitutes a place for the encounter and becoming of mother and child, not only as sapient beings, but also in their very nature. Before and beyond the difference between self and other, the placenta offers a model of affective symbiogenesis where selves come into existence in and through the very materiality of one another, contradicting the presumed "immunitary logic of selfpreservation."

The section on placental (re)presentation crafts a placentology that accounts for the possibility of ontogenetic becoming ...


Artificial Intelligence And Public Trust, Shannon Vallor Jul 2017

Artificial Intelligence And Public Trust, Shannon Vallor

Philosophy

The future is here. With the exploding commercial market for high-powered, cloud-computing AI services provided by the likes of Amazon, Microsoft, and Google, the reach of artificial intelligence technologies is virtually unlimited. What does this mean for humans? How will we adapt to a world in which we increasingly find ourselves in economic, creative, and cognitive competition with machines? Will we embrace these new technologies with the same fervor as we embraced televisions and smartphones? Will we trust them? Should we trust them?


Examining Assumptions About Student Engagement In The Classroom: A Faculty Learning Community’S Yearlong Journey, Marjolein Oele May 2017

Examining Assumptions About Student Engagement In The Classroom: A Faculty Learning Community’S Yearlong Journey, Marjolein Oele

Philosophy

Over the past twenty years, the term “student engagement” has become a primary means for orienting faculty and administrators around pedagogic improvements and curriculum development. The increasing prevalence of technology in educational settings and the ways it alters more traditional classroom formats, student-teacher interactions, and research methods suggest that engagement may now look and function differently than in the past. This article describes the reflective journey of a yearlong Faculty Learning Community (FLC) at a private, urban Jesuit university on the topic of student engagement. It investigates and debates current thinking on the topic, assesses methods of measurement, and shares ...


Teaching About The Politics Of Religion And Social Change, Dean Johnson Mar 2017

Teaching About The Politics Of Religion And Social Change, Dean Johnson

Philosophy

No abstract provided.


Folding Nature Back Upon Itself: Aristotle And The Rebirth Of "Physis", Marjolein Oele Jan 2017

Folding Nature Back Upon Itself: Aristotle And The Rebirth Of "Physis", Marjolein Oele

Philosophy

“Folding Nature Back Upon Itself: Aristotle and the Rebirth of Physis,” confronts us with nature’s receding presence and proposes to think through a rebirth of physis. Following Aristotle’s concept of physis, this paper locates two axes along which such a rethinking of physis can take place. The first axis is vertical, and turns around the fundamental tension that each natural being faces in seeking to overcome its own matter in order to reach transcendence. The second axis is horizontal, and follows Aristotle’s ideas that physis cannot unfold unless aided, stimulated, nurtured and enforced by external factors such ...


Introduction: Envisioning The Good Life In The 21st Century And Beyond, Shannon Vallor Sep 2016

Introduction: Envisioning The Good Life In The 21st Century And Beyond, Shannon Vallor

Philosophy

In May 2014 cosmologist Stephen Hawking, computer scientist Stuart Russell, and physicists Max Tegmark and Frank Wilczek published an open letter in the UK news outlet The Independent, sounding the alarm about the grave risks to humanity posed by emerging technologies of artificial intelligence. They invited readers to imagine these technologies "outsmarting financial markets, out-inventing human researchers, out-manipulating human leaders, and developing weapons we cannot even understand." The authors note that while the successful creation of artificial intelligence (AI) has the potential to bring "huge benefits" to our world, and would undoubtedly be "the biggest event in human history ... it ...


Hegel, History, And Evil, Philip J. Kain Jul 2016

Hegel, History, And Evil, Philip J. Kain

Philosophy

In the Philosophy of Right, Hegel tells us that what he means by "right" includes not merely morality (Moralität) and ethics (Sittlichkeit) but world history. He even tells us that the right of world history "is the highest right" (PR [White] §33, §33A).2 He tells us that, through interaction with other nations, the spirit of a people realizes itself in world history (PR §33). This can involve a collision of rights, and such collision will mean that one right gets subordinated to another: "Only the right of world spirit is absolute without restriction" (PR [White] §30R).3 It is ...


Scatter 1: The Politics Of Politics In Foucault, Heidegger, And Derrida [Table Of Contents], Geoffrey Bennington May 2016

Scatter 1: The Politics Of Politics In Foucault, Heidegger, And Derrida [Table Of Contents], Geoffrey Bennington

Philosophy

“Bennington’s Scatter 1 is a sophisticated, detailed, and strikingly original demonstration of the political efficacy of deconstruction. As always with Bennington, to read him is to undergo an education in reading.” —Robert Bernasconi, Pennsylvania State University


The Matter Of Voice: Sensual Soundings [Table Of Contents], Karmen Mackendrick May 2016

The Matter Of Voice: Sensual Soundings [Table Of Contents], Karmen Mackendrick

Philosophy

The Matter of Voice is a work of philosophical theology in a multidisciplinary and poetic key. Its central organizing insight is that voice and voicing are productive of corporeality and rhythm in language. As MacKendrick shows, at the heart of the voice is ‘an irreducible and carnal strangeness’ that refuses closure and invites passion back into thinking. The book is a sterling exemplar of the richness that results from attending to the somatic quality of words, yielding a layering of ideas that forms a virtual chorus of multiperspectival thinking.” —Patricia Cox Miller, Syracuse University


Anscombe, Thomson, And Double Effect, Thomas A. Cavanaugh Jan 2016

Anscombe, Thomson, And Double Effect, Thomas A. Cavanaugh

Philosophy

In “Modern Moral Philosophy” Anscombe argues that the distinction between intention of an end or means and foresight of a consequentially comparable outcome proves crucial in act-evaluation. The deontologist J. J. Thomson disagrees. She asserts that Anscombe mistakes the distinction’s moral import; it bears on agent-evaluation, not act-evaluation. I map out the contours of this dispute. I show that it implicates other disagreements, some to be expected and others not to be expected. Amongst the expected, one finds the ethicists’ accounts of action and understanding of how agent-assessment relates to act-assessment. Amongst the unexpected, one finds the moralists’ views ...


Dignity, Pet-Euthanasia And Person Euthanasia, Thomas A. Cavanaugh Jan 2016

Dignity, Pet-Euthanasia And Person Euthanasia, Thomas A. Cavanaugh

Philosophy

Challenging the standard argument for euthanasia, G. E. M. Anscombe holds that euthanasia does not comport with human dignity interpreted in terms of self-determination. For, were self-determination to ground any killing it would justify self-killing, not being killed by another. I articulate reasons for thinking that she correctly identifies the dissonance of self-determination with euthanasia. Additionally, I argue that the same holds, less obviously, for physician-assisted suicide (PAS, which she does not explicitly consider).

Moreover, Anscombe suggests that what actually occurs in euthanasia in effect equates a person to a humanely euthanized dog and, thereby, trivializes and degrades human lives ...


The Primacy Of Hope, Joan Woolfrey Jan 2016

The Primacy Of Hope, Joan Woolfrey

Philosophy

This paper raises the question of whether there is anything foundational to hopefulness when considering it as a virtue, and uses the Aristotelian distinction between virtue in the “natural sense” and virtue in the “strict sense” to make the claim that hopefulness has a primacy to it. While that primacy rests on the existence of care and responsiveness of community, those caretakers must themselves be possessed of hopefulness, which, at its best will be virtuous.


The Infectiousness Of Hope, Joan Woolfrey Oct 2015

The Infectiousness Of Hope, Joan Woolfrey

Philosophy

No abstract provided.


Hegel On Sovereignty And Monarchy, Philip J. Kain Oct 2015

Hegel On Sovereignty And Monarchy, Philip J. Kain

Philosophy

Hegel is not a democrat. He is a monarchist. But he wants monarchy because he does not want strong government. He wants to deemphasize power. He develops an idealist conception of sovereignty that allows for a monarch less powerful than a president—one whose task is to expresses the unity of the state and realize the rationality inherent in it. A monarch needs to be a conduit through which reason is expressed and actualized, not a power that might obstruct this process.


Hegel, Recognition, And Same-Sex Marriage, Philip J. Kain Jul 2015

Hegel, Recognition, And Same-Sex Marriage, Philip J. Kain

Philosophy

To understand Hegel's concepts of love, marriage, and Sittlichkeit, which are closely related, we must begin to understand his very important theory of recognition. This will be the task of Section II of this article. In pursuing this task, we must be careful to avoid the mistake, made by some commentators, of thinking that mutual recognition between equals is sufficient either for marriage or for Sittlichkeit. For Hegel, I hope to show, the more significant and powerful the recognizer, the more real the recognized—such that, ultimately, recognition must come from spirit (Geist). Then, to better understand Hegel's ...


Toward A More Intuitive Virtue Ethics: A Perspectival View, James Fanciullo May 2015

Toward A More Intuitive Virtue Ethics: A Perspectival View, James Fanciullo

Philosophy

No abstract provided.


What Fanon Said: A Philosophical Introduction To His Life And Thought, Lewis R. Gordon, Sonia Dayan-Herzbrun, Drucilla Cornell Apr 2015

What Fanon Said: A Philosophical Introduction To His Life And Thought, Lewis R. Gordon, Sonia Dayan-Herzbrun, Drucilla Cornell

Philosophy

Challenging the notion of theory as white and experience as black, Lewis Gordon here offers a philosophical portrait of the thought and life of the Martinican-turned-Algerian revolutionary psychiatrist and philosopher Frantz Fanon as an example of “living thought” against the legacies of colonialism and racism, and thereby shows the continued relevance and importance of his ideas.


Olympe De Gouges (1748—1793), Joan Woolfrey Jan 2015

Olympe De Gouges (1748—1793), Joan Woolfrey

Philosophy

No abstract provided.


Abuses Of Double Effect, Anscombe’S Principle Of Side Effects, And A (Sound) Account Of Duplex Effectus, Thomas A. Cavanaugh Jan 2015

Abuses Of Double Effect, Anscombe’S Principle Of Side Effects, And A (Sound) Account Of Duplex Effectus, Thomas A. Cavanaugh

Philosophy

No abstract provided.


Der And Policy: The Recommendation Of A Topic, Thomas A. Cavanaugh Jan 2015

Der And Policy: The Recommendation Of A Topic, Thomas A. Cavanaugh

Philosophy

If viable, DER justifies certain individual acts that–by definition–have two effects. Presumably, it would in some fashion (at the very least, redundantly) justify policies concerning the very same acts. By contrast, acts that sometimes have a good effect and sometimes have a bad effect do not have the requisite two effects such that DER can justify them immediately. Yet, a policy concerning numerous such acts would have the requisite good and bad effects. For while any one such act would lack the relevant two effects, a series of such acts and a policy governing such a series would ...