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Contemporary Aesthetics (Journal)

Artification

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Full-Text Articles in Philosophy

Variations On Artification, Ossi Naukkarinen Jan 2012

Variations On Artification, Ossi Naukkarinen

Contemporary Aesthetics (Journal)

The purpose of this article is to provide an overview of the most important aspects of the concept of artification. I will proceed through five main questions: (1) What does artification mean? (2) What can become artified? (3) Why does artification take place? (4) How can it manifest itself? (5) What kinds of things are accentuated in artification processes? The answers to these questions have a direct influence on how we understand artification’s real effects and those desired but not necessarily actual on both the things that become artified and on art itself. At the end of the article ...


Artification, Fine Art, And The Myth Of "The Artist", Larry Shiner Jan 2012

Artification, Fine Art, And The Myth Of "The Artist", Larry Shiner

Contemporary Aesthetics (Journal)

I begin by examining three concepts of “artification:” the decoration, transformation, and modification. I argue that the typical business argument for artification claims that since businesses must be constantly innovating and since art and artists are the principal locus of creativity in our society, businesses must be “artified.” I argue that these claims about artists and creativity are based on widely accepted conventional views about art and artists that are false. I illustrate my general argument by examining one of the best statements of the case for business artification, Austin’s and Devin’s book, Artful Making, showing that artful ...


Aesthetization, Artification, And Aquariums, Thomas Leddy Jan 2012

Aesthetization, Artification, And Aquariums, Thomas Leddy

Contemporary Aesthetics (Journal)

‘Artification’ is a term recently coined and developed in Finnish aesthetic theory and proposed by Ossi Naukkarinen in this volume as the process of treating non-art objects as art. In this paper, I distinguish between a superficial sort of artification and a deep sort. The superficial sort is the one we need to worry about. In Part I, I consider various issues surrounding the definition of artification. In the process, I situate artification within the larger question of aestheticization. I understand aestheticization in terms of recent psychological work on supernormal stimuli and Virginia Postrel’s defense of style and surface ...


Pending On Art, Pauline Von Bonsdorff Jan 2012

Pending On Art, Pauline Von Bonsdorff

Contemporary Aesthetics (Journal)

Artification is mostly approached from a contextualist perspective where “art” refers to objects that are presented and appreciated within socially recognized art institutions. Artification then means that the notion of art is extended to non-art areas. Yet it can be argued that contextualism is circular, since it starts with an unquestioned assumption about what art is. Another weakness of contextualism is that by privileging theory it tends to downplay the role of creative and appreciative practices. Alternative approaches are possible, and this article explores in a preliminary way what a naturalist approach could mean for how we see art and ...


Artification For Well-Being: Institutional Living As A Special Case, Susann Vihma Jan 2012

Artification For Well-Being: Institutional Living As A Special Case, Susann Vihma

Contemporary Aesthetics (Journal)

Millions of people live in institutional residences that differ significantly from their homes. This article looks closely into the quality of these habitations and points out some critical characteristics based on a research project called CoWell. One salient question circles around the concept of homeyness, which in many countries is the main objective to realize in institutional living. Some kind of artification is implemented and is seen as a means for achieving a homey atmosphere and of stimulating the inhabitants and the staff. However, very little research has been done on homeyness. Cleanliness, permanence, and randomness are often recognizable in ...


Artification And The Drawing Of Distinctions: An Analysis Of Categories And Their Uses, Kari Korolainen Jan 2012

Artification And The Drawing Of Distinctions: An Analysis Of Categories And Their Uses, Kari Korolainen

Contemporary Aesthetics (Journal)

The aim of the article is to examine how we distinguish between art, decoration, and furnishing within a research interview. The interview specimens here are examined by adapting the ethnomethodologically oriented method of Membership Categorization Analysis. The results indicate that the speakers rely, for example, on the context of the interview situation and also use flexible logical means, such as conditioning and comparison, to make the discussed issues more comprehensive. The results of the analysis are interpreted in the context of artification, emphasizing in particular the notion of the situated process of categorical resiliency.


Artification Of Sport: The Case Of Distance Running, Matti Tainio Jan 2012

Artification Of Sport: The Case Of Distance Running, Matti Tainio

Contemporary Aesthetics (Journal)

This article deals with the possibilities of artification in sport, using distance running as an example. Sport is viewed as one phenomenon in the history of physical cultures, with both predecessors and also the possibility of developing into something new. Sport was first defined primarily as a competitive activity but, by the end of the twentieth century, it had developed as part of the athletic trend towards exploring experience-seeking fitness sports. Through the developments of contemporary visual art, sport has also become a possible medium of art. These developments, both in sport and art, provide an opportunity to look for ...


When Is Artification?, Roberta Shapiro, Nathalie Heinich Jan 2012

When Is Artification?, Roberta Shapiro, Nathalie Heinich

Contemporary Aesthetics (Journal)

How do people do or make things that come to be seen as works of art? In other words, when is there artification? The answer to this question is simultaneously symbolic, material, and contextual. It has to do with meanings, objects, interaction, and institutions. We seek to define not what art is nor how it should be considered, but how and under what circumstances it comes about by way of methodical observation and inquiry in a variety of fields. Circus acrobats, breakdancers, fashion designers, chefs, graffiti artists, printers, photographers, and jazz musicians are some of the examples we explore. This ...


"... And I'D Look At My Hands And Think Of Lady Macbeth ...", Yrjänä Levanto Jan 2012

"... And I'D Look At My Hands And Think Of Lady Macbeth ...", Yrjänä Levanto

Contemporary Aesthetics (Journal)

After resigning from the service of Sotheby's Auction House, Bruce Chatwin changed his views on art, the art world, and art history. He developed an approach that differed from establised art-historical writing; he began to contextualize differently. He saw and understood the use of artstic means more widely than in traditional art-historical writing. From Chatwin's viewpoint, one possibilty was to "smuggle" new material into the existing system. In this study, I take as my material Bruce Chatwin's enthusiasm and loyalty to Andre Malraux and his ideas about Le Musee Imaginaire. I also make use of Chatwin's ...


Artification In Natural History Museums, Kaisa Mäki-Petäjä Jan 2012

Artification In Natural History Museums, Kaisa Mäki-Petäjä

Contemporary Aesthetics (Journal)

Natural history exhibitions have changed considerably over recent decades concurring with a rise of a general movement of aestheticization in the Western culture. This usually results from an attempt to make the exhibitions more appealing to provide the public numerous ways of enjoying themselves, but they are also used to communicate information, especially of an ethical and affective kind. In this paper I will consider the effects of a particular kind of aestheticization, namely artification, of these kinds of exhibitions. Artification, i.e, the process of regarding non-art objects as art, appears to be in conflict with the science-based purposes ...