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University of Windsor

Argumentation theory

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Full-Text Articles in Philosophy

A Ludological Perspective On Argument, Michael A. Yong-Set May 2016

A Ludological Perspective On Argument, Michael A. Yong-Set

OSSA Conference Archive

This introductory paper explores a new perspective on argumentation that draws upon the resources of ludology – the critical and academic of study of games qua games. In the Philosophical Investigations, one of the later Wittgenstein’s more mysterious suggestions is that if one understands how games work, then one would be able to understand how natural language works. Similarly, it will be argued that if we look to how games function as games, we will be able to understand how the ‘argument-game’ functions. The epistemic importance of rhetorical argumentation rather than analytic demonstration becomes apparent if we consider ‘argument’ as ...


Normative Argumentation Theory Without Fundamental Principles, Eugen Octav Popa May 2016

Normative Argumentation Theory Without Fundamental Principles, Eugen Octav Popa

OSSA Conference Archive

In this paper I develop and defend a form of argumentative normativity that is not based on fundamental principles. I first argue that research agendas that aim to discover (or claimed to have discovered) fundamental principles of ‘good’ argumentative discourse share one crucial weak spot, viz. circularity. I then argue that this weak spot can be avoided in a pancritical (Bartley, 1984) view of normativity.


Argumentation As An Ethical And Political Choice, Menashe Schwed May 2013

Argumentation As An Ethical And Political Choice, Menashe Schwed

OSSA Conference Archive

The paper's two theses are: First, that the historical and philosophical roots of argumentation are in ethics and politics, and not in any formal ideal, be it mathematical, scientific or other. Furthermore, argumentation is a human invention, deeply tied up with the emergence of democracy in ancient Greece. Second, that argumentation presupposes and advances concurrently humanistic values, especially the autonomy of the individual to think and decide in a free and uncoerced manner.


Rhetoric, Dialectic And Logic: The Triad De-Compartmentalized, Charlotte Jørgensen May 2013

Rhetoric, Dialectic And Logic: The Triad De-Compartmentalized, Charlotte Jørgensen

OSSA Conference Archive

Taking Blair’s recent contribution to the debate about the triad as its starting point, the paper discusses and challenges the effort to reduce the intricate relationship between rhetoric, dialectic, and logic to a single criterion or watertight trichotomy. I argue that such efforts obscure the complexities within the fields, their differences being partly due to disciplinary traditions. They neglect the intermingling properties of the fields as well as the possibilities for theoretical bridging between them.


Rationality, Reasonableness And Informal Logic: A Case Study Of Chaim Perelman, Rongdong Jin, Christopher W. Tindale May 2011

Rationality, Reasonableness And Informal Logic: A Case Study Of Chaim Perelman, Rongdong Jin, Christopher W. Tindale

OSSA Conference Archive

Perelman’s discussion about the distinction and relation between the rational and the reason-able could be seen as an attempt to bring forward a new understanding of rationality. In light of the concep-tion of situated reason, this paper argues that Perelman’s explication of the dialectic of the rational and the reasonable highlights the balance of universality and contexuality, and could contribute a fuller conception of rationality to establishing a solid philosophical foundation for Johnson’s informal logic.