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The College at Brockport: State University of New York

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Articles 1 - 30 of 280

Full-Text Articles in Philosophy

Permanent Functions Of Characters’ Proper Names In Harry Potter, Martyna Gibka Jan 2019

Permanent Functions Of Characters’ Proper Names In Harry Potter, Martyna Gibka

Journal of Literary Onomastics

No abstract.


Autonomy, Education, Virtue, Seamus Clarkin Dec 2018

Autonomy, Education, Virtue, Seamus Clarkin

Education and Human Development Master's Theses

The ways in which educators have tried to implement autonomy support have typically been constrained by their pedagogical interests and demands from above for certain threshold levels of performance. In our current educational system, this treats autonomy as a means to the end of measurement-based outcomes. The research on autonomy such as self-determination theory (SDT) often acknowledges the significance as a matter of background, but the actual ways teachers bring it into class is typically much more superficial than what might be possible with authentic cognitive autonomy support. Further, the innate status of the three needs put forth by SDT ...


Art, Pleasure, Value: Reframing The Questions, Mohan Matthen Jan 2018

Art, Pleasure, Value: Reframing The Questions, Mohan Matthen

Philosophic Exchange

In this essay, I’ll argue, first, that an art object's aesthetic value (or merit) depends not just on its intrinsic properties, but on the response it evokes from a consumer who shares the producer's cultural background. My question is: what is the role of culture in relation to this response? I offer a new account of aesthetic pleasure that answers this question. On this account, aesthetic pleasure is not just a “feeling” or “sensation” that results from engaging with a work of art. It is rather a mental state that facilitates engagement with an artwork, and (in ...


Should We Be Moved By What Motivates Expressivism?, Terence Cuneo Jan 2018

Should We Be Moved By What Motivates Expressivism?, Terence Cuneo

Philosophic Exchange

When two views differ as sharply as do realism and expressivism, it is easy for their proponents to talk past one another, failing to understand the other’s most fundamental commitments. My project in this essay is to bring these two very different views into conversation. I begin by offering a more specific characterization of both expressivism and realism, noting where some of their important differences lie. I then identify the primary rationale that expressivists offer for rejecting moral realism in favor of their view, an argument that has a long history in the expressivist tradition, which I refer to ...


The Self In The Age Of Cognitive Science: Decoupling The Self From The Personal Level, Robert D. Rupert Jan 2018

The Self In The Age Of Cognitive Science: Decoupling The Self From The Personal Level, Robert D. Rupert

Philosophic Exchange

Philosophers of mind commonly draw a distinction between the personal level – the distinctive realm of conscious experience and reasoned deliberation – and the subpersonal level, the domain of mindless mechanism and brute cause and effect. Moreover, they tend to view cognitive science through the lens of this distinction. Facts about the personal level are given a priori, by introspection, or by common sense; the job of cognitive science is merely to investigate the mechanistic basis of these facts. I argue that this view misrepresents the structure of cognitive-scientific enquiry. Taken at face value, cognitive science makes no commitment to the existence ...


Conceptual Analysis And Its Limits, Karen Bennett Oct 2017

Conceptual Analysis And Its Limits, Karen Bennett

Philosophic Exchange

My topic is conceptual analysis and its limits. I will start by sketching what I mean by ‘conceptual analysis’, and saying a bit about how it is used in contemporary philosophy. Then I will point out two limitations of the method, and illustrate these limits with examples: some from the philosophical literature, and some from biology.


The Ethics Of Eating Meat, David Sobel Oct 2017

The Ethics Of Eating Meat, David Sobel

Philosophic Exchange

In this paper I argue for the claim that it is morally problematic to get as many of our calories as we do from factory farmed meat. I divide up the problems into the categories of 1) Harm to Animals, 2) Harm to the Environment, and 3) Harm to Humans. I conclude with a series of common defenses of eating factory-farmed meat and offer a reply to each. I conclude that it would be morally better to cut down on the amount of factory-farmed meat one eats provided one can afford and find palatable alternatives.


Unique Onomastic Information In The Lebor Na Huidre Táin, Matthew Holmberg May 2017

Unique Onomastic Information In The Lebor Na Huidre Táin, Matthew Holmberg

Journal of Literary Onomastics

No abstract.


Imag(In)Ing The Holy Places: A Comparison Between The Diagrams In Adomnán’S And Bede’S De Locis Sanctis, Patrick P. O'Neill May 2017

Imag(In)Ing The Holy Places: A Comparison Between The Diagrams In Adomnán’S And Bede’S De Locis Sanctis, Patrick P. O'Neill

Journal of Literary Onomastics

No abstract.


Preaching The Landscape In The Blickling Homilies, Danielle Cudmore May 2017

Preaching The Landscape In The Blickling Homilies, Danielle Cudmore

Journal of Literary Onomastics

No abstract.


The Power Of Place: Colonization Of The Anglo-Saxon Landscape By Royal And Religious Ideologies, Samantha Leggett May 2017

The Power Of Place: Colonization Of The Anglo-Saxon Landscape By Royal And Religious Ideologies, Samantha Leggett

Journal of Literary Onomastics

No abstract.


Locating Place And Landscape In Early Insular Literature, A. Joseph Mcmullen, Kristen Carella May 2017

Locating Place And Landscape In Early Insular Literature, A. Joseph Mcmullen, Kristen Carella

Journal of Literary Onomastics

No abstract.


Aristotle And Darwin: Antagonists Or Kindred Spirits?, James G. Lennox Jan 2017

Aristotle And Darwin: Antagonists Or Kindred Spirits?, James G. Lennox

Philosophic Exchange

In the decades following the forging of the so-called Neo-Darwinian Synthesis in the 1940s, a number of its philosophical defenders created a myth about what Charles Darwin was up against, a viewpoint called “typological essentialism” often attributed to Aristotle. In this paper I first sketch the history of how this myth was created. I then establish that it is a myth by providing an account of Aristotle’s essentialism as it is actually displayed in his philosophy of biology and in his biological practice. It has nothing to do with the ‘mythic’ version. We then turn to what Darwin was ...


Well-Being At A Time, Ben Bradley Aug 2016

Well-Being At A Time, Ben Bradley

Philosophic Exchange

No abstract provided.


Understanding Consciousness—Have We Cut The Gordian Knot Or Not? (Integration, Unity, And The Self), Robert Van Gulick Aug 2016

Understanding Consciousness—Have We Cut The Gordian Knot Or Not? (Integration, Unity, And The Self), Robert Van Gulick

Philosophic Exchange

No abstract provided.


A Mysterious Case Of Missing Value, Earl Conee Aug 2016

A Mysterious Case Of Missing Value, Earl Conee

Philosophic Exchange

No abstract provided.


The Role Of Impartial Consequentialism In The United States Government, Nichole Sands May 2016

The Role Of Impartial Consequentialism In The United States Government, Nichole Sands

Senior Honors Theses

When forming a government one must consider how the laws of the state will align with moral principles. One such possible moral principle is called ‘impartial consequentialism’. That is the thesis according to which an action is morally right if and only if it maximizes the aggregate good. This honors thesis will discuss three issues. The first issue is whether and to what extent impartial consequentialism has influenced the formation of the United States government. The second issue is the apparent conflict between the Bill of Rights and the concept of impartial consequentialism. The third issue involves a potential objection ...


Love And Duty, Julia Driver Jan 2014

Love And Duty, Julia Driver

Philosophic Exchange

The thesis of this paper is that there is an important asymmetry between a duty to love and a duty to not love: there is no duty to love as a fitting response to someone’s very good qualities, but there is a duty to not love as a fitting response to someone’s very bad qualities. The source of the asymmetry that I discuss is the two-part understanding of love: the emotional part and the evaluative commitment part. One cannot directly, or “at will,” control an emotional response, but one can undermine any commitment one would normally have under ...


Evolutionary Theory And Morality: Why The Science Doesn't Settle The Philosophical Questions, William J. Fitzpatrick Jan 2014

Evolutionary Theory And Morality: Why The Science Doesn't Settle The Philosophical Questions, William J. Fitzpatrick

Philosophic Exchange

Four decades ago, E.O. Wilson famously declared that “the time has come for ethics to be removed temporarily from the hands of the philosophers and biologicized." One still finds Wilson’s idea echoed frequently in popular science writing today. While I’m not going to deny that evolutionary biology and other sciences have important things to tell us about morality, I think there is a lot of confusion about what exactly they can tell us, and how much they can tell us. My aim here is first to make some distinctions and sort out some issues, and then to ...


Of Fortunes And Fortune: Justice And The Variety Of Inputs To Wealth, Craig Duncan Jan 2014

Of Fortunes And Fortune: Justice And The Variety Of Inputs To Wealth, Craig Duncan

Philosophic Exchange

No abstract provided.


Parfit’S ‘Triple Theory’ And Its Troubles, David Mcnaughton, Piers Rawling Jan 2014

Parfit’S ‘Triple Theory’ And Its Troubles, David Mcnaughton, Piers Rawling

Philosophic Exchange

No abstract provided.


Adventures In Rationalism, Michael Della Rocca Jul 2013

Adventures In Rationalism, Michael Della Rocca

Philosophic Exchange

Rationalism is the thesis that the world and all the things in the world are intelligible, through and through. Nothing happens for no reason. On the contrary, whatever takes place, whatever exists, takes place or exists for a reason. Everything. On this view there are no brute facts. Each thing that exists has a reason that is sufficient for explaining the existence of the thing. According to perhaps the most extreme implication of this view, even the world itself, the totality of all that exists, exists for a reason, has an explanation. Many philosophers today think that rationalism is a ...


Is Patriotism Immoral?, Richard Arneson Jul 2013

Is Patriotism Immoral?, Richard Arneson

Philosophic Exchange

The principle of patriotism says that we are morally required to favor our own nation and its people. But there is an opposed moral perspective: cosmopolitanism. The cosmopolitan regards herself as a citizen of the world and holds that national borders lack intrinsic, noninstrumental moral significance. The cosmopolitan view is that people are people, and our common humanity is the ground of our moral duties toward people. This paper examines some recent arguments for patriotism, and finds them all wanting. In the absence of any good argument for patriotism, perhaps we should consider cosmopolitanism.


Free Will And Neuroscience, Alfred Mele Jun 2013

Free Will And Neuroscience, Alfred Mele

Philosophic Exchange

Has modern neuroscience shown that free will is an illusion? Those who give an affirmative answer often argue as follows. The overt actions that have been studied in some recent experiments do not have corresponding consciously made decisions or conscious intentions among their causes. Therefore no overt actions have corresponding consciously made decisions or conscious intentions among their causes. This paper challenges this inference, arguing that it is unwarranted.


Tired Of Capitalism? How About Something Better?, David Schweickart May 2013

Tired Of Capitalism? How About Something Better?, David Schweickart

Philosophic Exchange

Capitalism causes staggering inequality, rising unemployment, growing poverty, and the degradation of democracy. But is there any viable alternative? Is there a form of socialism that would preserve the strengths of competitive capitalism, yet mitigate its worst evils? This paper argues that there is such an alternative -- economic democracy. An economic democracy keeps competitive markets for goods and services, but dispenses with labor markets and capital markets. It replaces labor markets with worker ownership, and capital markets with democratic control of investment. These mechanisms will preserve the principal advantages of capitalism, while mitigating its worst evils.


Pragmatism In Philosophy: The Hidden Alternative, Simon Blackburn Sep 2011

Pragmatism In Philosophy: The Hidden Alternative, Simon Blackburn

Philosophic Exchange

This paper contrasts two ways of understanding the function of human thought and language. According to representationalism, the function of thought and language is to refer to entities in the world and assert truths about them. By contrast, pragmatism seeks to understand the function of thought and language without any such appeal, at the most fundamental level, to the concepts of truth or reference.


Re-Humanizing Descartes, Alison Simmons Jul 2011

Re-Humanizing Descartes, Alison Simmons

Philosophic Exchange

Descartes’ mind-body dualism and his quest for objective knowledge can appear de-humanizing. My aim in this paper is to re-humanize Descartes. When we take a closer look at what Descartes actually says about human beings, it casts his entire thought in a much different light.


In Defense Of The Four-Case Manipulation Argument For Hard Incompatibilism, Krasimira Filcheva May 2011

In Defense Of The Four-Case Manipulation Argument For Hard Incompatibilism, Krasimira Filcheva

Senior Honors Theses

Derk Pereboom's four-case manipulation argument has proved to be a major point of contention between compatibilism and hard incompatibilism in the debate over causal determinism's alleged threat to free will and moral responsibility. Notably, the four-case argument has met Michael Mckenna's so called hard-line reply, a six-case argument modeled after Pereboom’s four-case one and intended to establish a dialectical stalemate between the compatibilist and incompatibilist positions on largely intuitive grounds. Mckenna contends that his six-case argument elicits compatibilistically friendly intuitions about Pereboom’s case 1 in which the agent is said to be morally responsible. I ...


Aristotelian Happiness, Paula Gottlieb Apr 2011

Aristotelian Happiness, Paula Gottlieb

Philosophic Exchange

Aristotle’s account of happiness aims to show that happiness is both objective and attainable. According to Aristotle, the pursuit of happiness benefits both the agent and other people too. This paper attempts to explain how Aristotle’s account supports these claims. Along the way, I argue that Aristotle’s much-maligned doctrine of the mean has some true and important implications concerning the nature and value of happiness.


"Crafting Natures": Aristotle On Animal Design, Mariska Leunissen Mar 2011

"Crafting Natures": Aristotle On Animal Design, Mariska Leunissen

Philosophic Exchange

It is a commonplace in Aristotelian scholarship that the forms of living beings and the animal species to which they give rise are “fixed.” However, Aristotle’s biological works often stress the flexibility of nature during the development of animals. The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to delineate the range of flexibility that Aristotle takes natures to have in the design of animals; and second, to draw out the implications of this for Aristotle’s embryology and theory of natural teleology.