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Swarthmore College

Impartiality

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Full-Text Articles in Philosophy

Tecnociência Comercialmente Orientada Ou Investigação Multiestratégica?, Hugh Lacey Oct 2014

Tecnociência Comercialmente Orientada Ou Investigação Multiestratégica?, Hugh Lacey

Philosophy Faculty Works

The model of the interactions between scientific activities and values (M-CV) provides tools to criticize the scientific activities that are currently predominant in scientific institutions, and to identify some alternative possibilities for research that are not receiving due recognition in them. Most importantly, M-CV helps us to identify a deep incoherence in the common self-interpretation of the modern scientific tradition, and also to recognize that there are available two competing coherent interpretations - 'commercially oriented technoscience' and 'multi-strategy research' - that maintain continuity with the great cognitive successes of modern science.


O Modelo Das Interações Entre As Atividades Científicas E Os Valores, Hugh Lacey, P. R. Mariconda Jan 2014

O Modelo Das Interações Entre As Atividades Científicas E Os Valores, Hugh Lacey, P. R. Mariconda

Philosophy Faculty Works

In this article, we offer standardized versions of the principal ideas of the model of the interactions among scientific activities and values that has been proposed in recent years within Scientiae Studia. The model deals with the various roles played by values—ethical, social, political, cognitive (epistemic), religious, etc—in scientific activities, and with their impact on the viability of the ideals (impartiality, comprehensiveness, neutrality, autonomy) of the tradition of modern science.


A Imparcialidade Da Ciência E As Responsabilidades Dos Cientistas, Hugh Lacey Jan 2011

A Imparcialidade Da Ciência E As Responsabilidades Dos Cientistas, Hugh Lacey

Philosophy Faculty Works

This article, making use of a distinction between endorsing and accepting a claim, discusses the responsibilities that scientists incur in the light of the necessity to act, formulate policy, and to design regulations pertinent to technoscientific innovations, when decisions will inevitably be based, in important part, on claims that are only endorsed (and so implicated in compromises with ethical/social values), and not accepted in accordance with impartiality. Then, after introducing the notion of "impartial investigation", I conclude that the central responsibility of scientists is to engage in impartial investigation, and that this requires, not the exclusion of ethical and ...