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Full-Text Articles in Philosophy

Irigaray’S Madonna, Julie Kelso May 2015

Irigaray’S Madonna, Julie Kelso

Julie Kelso

In this essay, I argue that Luce Irigaray’s recent, seemingly esoteric readings of the Madonna, actually provide us with a constructive, perhaps even politically progressive, interpretive mode for engaging with the religious texts and figures of our tradition as women. As such, I argue that through her own specific interpretive practice Irigaray provides us with a new image of Mary, and this new Madonna figures the very interrelational interpretive practice that Irigaray believes essential when it comes to our engagements with the (religious) texts of our tradition. Irigaray’s Madonna is an ethical listener, interpreter and exchanger of ‘sacred ...


When Cherubim Touch: The Cleaving Feminine Wing Of The Dual-Gendered Cherubim In 2 Chronicles (Divrei Hayammim) 3: 11-12, Julie Kelso May 2015

When Cherubim Touch: The Cleaving Feminine Wing Of The Dual-Gendered Cherubim In 2 Chronicles (Divrei Hayammim) 3: 11-12, Julie Kelso

Julie Kelso

Extract:

According to Harold Bloom, contra Augustine, a serious mediation on the angel is not a pursuit valid only as an intellectual exercise and nothing more.


The Transgression Of Maacah In 2 Chronicles 15:16: A Simple Case Of Idolatry Or The Threatening Poesis Of Maternal Speech?, Julie Kelso Dec 2006

The Transgression Of Maacah In 2 Chronicles 15:16: A Simple Case Of Idolatry Or The Threatening Poesis Of Maternal Speech?, Julie Kelso

Julie Kelso

Extract:

In this essay, I shall argue that in Chronicles Maacah is not simply deposed because she is an idolater. Rather, in an important sense Maacah’s act of producing an idol for the goddess Asherah threatens patrilineal, patriarchal social order itself, as it is constructed and understood in Chronicles. Specifically, her act undermines the dominant (unconscious) phantasy at work in Chronicles: that of masculine, monosexual (re)production. To sustain itself, this phantasy requires the ‘silence’ or non-representation of the maternal body. In other words, it is not simply Maacah’s idolatry that sees her punished; it is her daring ...


Editorial: What Is The Bible And Critical Theory?, Roland Boer, Julie Kelso Dec 2006

Editorial: What Is The Bible And Critical Theory?, Roland Boer, Julie Kelso

Julie Kelso

No abstract provided.


Why Should Feminists Read The Bible?, Julie Kelso Dec 2006

Why Should Feminists Read The Bible?, Julie Kelso

Julie Kelso

Extract:

For many contemporary feminists, the Bible evokes a backward thinking, patriarchally defined body of literature and a social, political and economic ideological framework that has historically been used to maintain and perpetuate the oppression of women, along with that of non-white and/or non-Judeo-Christian 'others'.


Politicizing The (In)Audible : A Short Critique Of Mark Brett's Genesis (With Specific Reference To Genesis 34), Julie Kelso Dec 2005

Politicizing The (In)Audible : A Short Critique Of Mark Brett's Genesis (With Specific Reference To Genesis 34), Julie Kelso

Julie Kelso

In his recent book, _Genesis: Procreation and the Politics of Identity_, Mark Brett argues that Genesis (the first book of the Hebrew Bible) is a political text that addresses the debates within the `post-exilic' or `Persian' period concerning the nature of Israelite identity. The dominant push for ethnic purity found in the postexilic books of Ezra and Nehemiah is time and again undermined in Genesis by an integrationist polemic against the priestly desire for the `holy seed.' In other words, Brett argues that there is a discernible, 'inclusivist' (anti-ethnocentric) voice in Genesis. In this essay, I dispute the value he ...