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Hong Kong Baptist University

儒家思想

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Articles 1 - 5 of 5

Full-Text Articles in Philosophy

從儒家傳統論中醫職業精神的形成機制, Yunzhang Liu Jan 2014

從儒家傳統論中醫職業精神的形成機制, Yunzhang Liu

International Journal of Chinese & Comparative Philosophy of Medicine

The “Regulations on Medical Ethics for Medical Professionals in the PRC” promulgated by the Chinese Ministry of Health function as contemporary moral rules for medical professionalism. The principles underlying these ethical rules are not that different from those underlying bio-medical ethics in the West, which provides a broad platform for medical ethics and moral codes. However, this paper explores Confucian moral teachings to supplement the current discourse related to professional ethics. The issue up for discussion is how medical professionalism can be reconstructed based on Confucianism. This paper outlines the Confucian ethics that formed the cultural context in which traditional ...


儒家思想與健康概念, Junxiang Liu, Guanhui Wang Jan 2010

儒家思想與健康概念, Junxiang Liu, Guanhui Wang

International Journal of Chinese & Comparative Philosophy of Medicine

Health is one of the basic concepts in the philosophy of medicine. Some philosophers hold that just as there are different concepts of diseases, there are different concepts of health, because such concepts are deeply influenced by value judgments. This paper shows that health as we often talk about is the health of individual human beings, and that the concept of health should be based on an understanding of the essence of individual human beings. From this viewpoint, there is some common ground among the different concepts of health.

The key issue discussed in this paper is what Confucian philosophy ...


儒家誠信倫理乃醫患誠信之本——重塑中國現代醫患信任關係, Yang Yang Jan 2009

儒家誠信倫理乃醫患誠信之本——重塑中國現代醫患信任關係, Yang Yang

International Journal of Chinese & Comparative Philosophy of Medicine

A crisis of trust exists in the doctor-patient relationship in contemporary transitional China. This essay applies the Confucian notions of sincerity and trustworthiness to analyze the causes of the crisis. It argues that sincerity is the root of trust in human relations. For trust to develop between patients and doctors, sincerity must be cultivated. Without sincerity mediating human relations, trust between doctors and patients is impossible.

The Confucian doctrine of sincerity is based on one’s inherent moral personality, and is part of the virtuous treatment of others. In Confucianism, love is a relational virtue, meaning one should practice filial ...


中國文化是否構成了對知情同意的挑戰?, Wei Zhu Jan 2009

中國文化是否構成了對知情同意的挑戰?, Wei Zhu

International Journal of Chinese & Comparative Philosophy of Medicine

Since its introduction into China as a bioethical principle, informed consent has been a controversial topic. Many doubt its adoptability in the Chinese context. They claim that in China, it is often the family and not the patient that makes the decision about patient care in real clinical practice or medical research. In addition, Chinese culture appears incompatible with the principle of informed consent. As a result, many scholars conclude that Chinese culture constitutes a challenge to the application of informed consent in China.

This essay contends that such an argument does not hold water, or at least, is not ...


臨終關懷決策問題的倫理考慮, Ho Mun Chan Jan 2009

臨終關懷決策問題的倫理考慮, Ho Mun Chan

International Journal of Chinese & Comparative Philosophy of Medicine

This paper examines the end-of-life (EOL) decision-making process for mentally incapacitated patients from an ethical perspective. It introduces four common models in EOL decision making: medical paternalism, individualism, familism and the shared decision-making model. According to medical paternalism, the final decision should be made by the medical practitioner, whereas individualism asserts that this decision should be made by the patient before losing decisional capacity. Familism regards the final decision as a collective choice made by the family, whereas the shared decision-making model maintains that the family should jointly make the decision after taking the patient’s wishes, values and beliefs ...