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Hong Kong Baptist University

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Full-Text Articles in Philosophy

臨床知情同意在中國的一些實踐及反思, Wenqing Zhao Jan 2013

臨床知情同意在中國的一些實踐及反思, Wenqing Zhao

International Journal of Chinese & Comparative Philosophy of Medicine

Informed consent is considered to be one of the most important conceptual developments in contemporary bioethics, and is strongly implicated in the regulation of clinical practices in the West. Over the past decade, the growing prevalence of both liberal arguments supporting individual autonomy and rights-based debates focusing on equality has brought the concept of informed consent into the purview of Chinese legislation pertaining to healthcare and clinical practice. However, most of the laws and regulations are made by Chinese authorities in ignorance of the concept’s ethical groundings. In addition, lawmakers have not taken into account the empirical reality and ...


家庭作為弱勢人群的首重保障:儒家倫理與醫療倫理, Ping Cheung Lo Jan 2013

家庭作為弱勢人群的首重保障:儒家倫理與醫療倫理, Ping Cheung Lo

International Journal of Chinese & Comparative Philosophy of Medicine

Individualism is still very much alive in “international” bioethics. Using two documents from the International Bioethics Committee as examples (Proposed Outline for a Report on Respect for Human Vulnerability and Personal Integrity, 2009; Report of the IBC on the Principle of Respect for Human Vulnerability and Personal Integrity, 2011), and focusing on hospital patients as a vulnerable group, this essay points out the pitfalls of individualistic bioethics. Confucianism advocates family co-determination rather than individual self-determination, and this model of decision making can serve as the first bulwark in protecting vulnerable patients. This model of medical decision making is not unique ...


臨終關懷決策問題的倫理考慮, Ho Mun Chan Jan 2009

臨終關懷決策問題的倫理考慮, Ho Mun Chan

International Journal of Chinese & Comparative Philosophy of Medicine

This paper examines the end-of-life (EOL) decision-making process for mentally incapacitated patients from an ethical perspective. It introduces four common models in EOL decision making: medical paternalism, individualism, familism and the shared decision-making model. According to medical paternalism, the final decision should be made by the medical practitioner, whereas individualism asserts that this decision should be made by the patient before losing decisional capacity. Familism regards the final decision as a collective choice made by the family, whereas the shared decision-making model maintains that the family should jointly make the decision after taking the patient’s wishes, values and beliefs ...


末期病人的決策倫理:三個模式的比較, Ho-Mun Chan Jan 2001

末期病人的決策倫理:三個模式的比較, Ho-Mun Chan

International Journal of Chinese & Comparative Philosophy of Medicine

This paper critically examines the liberal, the medical paternalist, and the familial models of decision making for the terminally ill. It is argued that the liberal model is excessively patient centered while the medical paternalist model overemphasizes the role of the physician. The paper concludes that since both models marginalize the role of the family in the decision-making process, they are morally inadequate and not suitable for societies with strong family ethics, particularly those in Asia.

The liberal model is predominant in the United States. According to this model, a competent patient can express in an advance directive her prior ...