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Hong Kong Baptist University

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Full-Text Articles in Philosophy

儒家正義論及其對醫療公正問題的啟示, Shunqing Zhang Jan 2013

儒家正義論及其對醫療公正問題的啟示, Shunqing Zhang

International Journal of Chinese & Comparative Philosophy of Medicine

In the West, “justice” is a complex ethical principle, with meanings that range from the fair treatment of individuals to the equitable allocation of healthcare resources. Justice in bioethics is perhaps the most contested and controversial principle. This paper argues that the Confucian notion of justice is neither rights-based nor distributive; rather, it is based on the virtues of humanness and benevolence (ren), correct behavior and propriety (li), and uprightness and appropriateness (yi). Those virtues cherished in the Confucian tradition constitute what can be called a Confucian concept of justice, the primary principle of which is to respect human life ...


對虐貓事件的儒家生命倫理學思考——兼論動物權利, Yungling Wang Jan 2007

對虐貓事件的儒家生命倫理學思考——兼論動物權利, Yungling Wang

International Journal of Chinese & Comparative Philosophy of Medicine

In the spring of 2006, a Chinese woman maltreated a cat and caused indignation in Chinese society. Many individuals launched critiques on the woman with severe tongue, and public media took part in the report and critique of the incident. Some individuals argue that the woman infringed animal rights and the Chinese government should formulate a law to protect animal rights. This essay draws on Confucian moral and intellectual resources to contend that animals do not have rights and the Chinese government should not issue any law on animal rights.

The proposition of animal rights came from the modern Western ...


儒家的生死價值觀與安樂死, Ping Cheung Lo Jan 1998

儒家的生死價值觀與安樂死, Ping Cheung Lo

International Journal of Chinese & Comparative Philosophy of Medicine

This paper attempts to analyze four major arguments in favor of the moral acceptability of voluntary euthanasia (including physician-assisted-suicide) as found in the West, and tries to assess these arguments through Chinese Confucian ethics and its perspectives on life and death. Through such a cross-cultural dialogue the author concludes that there is some similarity as well as difference in Chinese and western values. The western moral values appealed to in advocating voluntary euthanasia, to a certain extent, can strike an echoing chord in Confucian ethics. In other words, though the debate on euthanasia is a contemporary phenomenon, the arguments and ...