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Full-Text Articles in Philosophy

Empirical And Dialogical Proofs Of God's Existence In Laws 10, Lewis Trelawny-Cassity Jan 2010

Empirical And Dialogical Proofs Of God's Existence In Laws 10, Lewis Trelawny-Cassity

The Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy Newsletter

Book 10 of the Laws is intended to prove that the gods exist, care for us, and are not persuaded by bribes (885b7-9). The arguments put forward concerning the gods in Book 10 are described as “our noblest and best prelude (kalliston te kai ariston prooimion) on behalf of the laws” (887c1). In this paper I want to investigate how Plato establishes the fact that nous, “god, in the correct sense, for the gods” (897b2), exists. Some scholars have noted the “empirical” character of Plato’s arguments for the existence of god in Laws 10. While empirical facts do provide ...


Aristotle On Knowledge, Nous And The Problems Of Necessary Truth, Thomas Kiefer Dec 2001

Aristotle On Knowledge, Nous And The Problems Of Necessary Truth, Thomas Kiefer

The Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy Newsletter

In this paper, I argue that nous for Aristotle concerns necessary truths. (1) Nous is the solution to the dilemma raised in Posterior Analytics I.3. (2) Knowledge and nous have necessary truths as their subject matter, and are identical to this subject matter. (3) This position creates two problems concerning (i) the innateness of knowledge and nous, and (ii) the mind-dependency of necessary truths. (4) The end of DA III.5 reveals an attempt to solve (i) and (ii): The necessary truths of knowledge and nous are for us innate in a certain way, appear to come to be ...


Aristotle On The Nature Of Logos, John P. Anton Mar 1997

Aristotle On The Nature Of Logos, John P. Anton

The Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy Newsletter

Attention has been frequently drawn to the problems attending attempts "to trace a long progression of meanings in the history of the word logos" (Kerferd). Especially difficult proved the assigning to Aristotle a place in this long progression. One of the reasons is that we have yet to reconstruct his theory of logos. The difficulty is not so much with the complexity of the uses of the term in his works as it is with the widely recognized fact that he left no special treatise on the subject of a doctrine of logos, not to be confused with the instrumentalities ...


Material Alteration And Cognitive Activity In Aristotle's De Anima, John Sisko Dec 1995

Material Alteration And Cognitive Activity In Aristotle's De Anima, John Sisko

The Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy Newsletter

In this paper, I would like to sketch my account of the relation between cognitive activity and material alteration within Aristotle's psychological theory. I will begin by suggesting a new framework through which to view the important issues (§2). I will then show that on Aristotle's account material alteration is required both for any episode of perception in animals taken generally (§3) and for any episode of thought in human beings (§4). Finally, I will examine Aristotle's rationale for supposing that material alteration is required for human thought (§5).


Aristotle On The Αρχή Of Practical Reasoning: Countering The Influence Of Sub-Humeanism, Lynn Holt Mar 1995

Aristotle On The Αρχή Of Practical Reasoning: Countering The Influence Of Sub-Humeanism, Lynn Holt

The Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy Newsletter

My central aim is to show that Aristotle convincingly avoids what has been the linchpin of the dominant contemporary view of the starting point of practical reasoning: that practical reasoning must begin, both normatively and motivationally, with some desire or want (call this sub-Humeanism). My task is made more difficult by the presence of a now common interpretation of Aristotle himself in which desire is both normatively and motivationally super-ordinate. On this view, Aristotle cannot be a genuine alternative to the contemporary view, since he just is a contemporary: Aristotle is the first sub-Humean about practical reasoning.

In order to ...


Intentionality And Isomorphism In Aristotle, Christopher Shields Apr 1994

Intentionality And Isomorphism In Aristotle, Christopher Shields

The Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy Newsletter

In this paper I investigate one central source of Aristotle's dissatisfaction with a comprehensive analogy between aisthêsis and noêsis. I will argue that his conception of nous as organless is neither empirically motivated nor obviously misguided. On the contrary, Aristotle's insistence that nous is separate and unmixed with the body is grounded in an approach to intentionality nascent in his treatment of noêsis. This approach to intentionality helps motivate the special status he awards nous.


Were The Neoplatonists Itealists Or Realists?, John Bussanich Mar 1992

Were The Neoplatonists Itealists Or Realists?, John Bussanich

The Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy Newsletter

Although it is relatively uncontroversial to characterize all Platonists as metaphysical idealists or immaterialists, the ascription to some of them of explicit arguments for epistemological idealism is controversial and problematic. It will be necessary to consider Neoplatonic attitudes toward perception of an external material world, but also the direct intellectual "perception" of the Forms.


Anaxagoras And Epicurus, Margaret Reesor Dec 1975

Anaxagoras And Epicurus, Margaret Reesor

The Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy Newsletter

It is, I believe, clear that Epicurus adopted an interpretation of the impression which was alien to Democritus’ atomic theory and closer to that of Anaxagoras. Anaxagoras may have believed that the qualities of the impression accurately reproduced the attributes of the objects; and he certainly regarded the objects of sense perception as true. He held that that from which an entity emerges had predominant parts which were the same as the predominant parts of the entity. Anaxagoras' experiments suggest that he was aware in some degree of the principle of confirmatory evidence and evidence to the contrary. His form ...


Mind's Commitment To The Real: Parmenides B8.34ff, Alexander P.D. Mourelatos Dec 1967

Mind's Commitment To The Real: Parmenides B8.34ff, Alexander P.D. Mourelatos

The Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy Newsletter

It is through an analysis of this passage that I can explain most clearly and directly a certain conception of the relation of mind to reality for which I also find evidence in other texts, in some of the characteristic aspects and themes of Parmenicles' poem, and which I consider philosophically and historically important.,