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Ergon

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Eudaimonism And The Demands Of Justice, Andrew Payne Apr 2006

Eudaimonism And The Demands Of Justice, Andrew Payne

The Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy Newsletter

The ancient eudaimonists were not misguided when they gave a prominent place to the human function in their ethical theory. Most modern reconstructions of eudaimonism do not employ the human function in this way. Though this gives them the appearance of being more streamlined and plausible, they fail to unify a life which respects the demands of justice. It is evident that in the Republic and other ancient ethical works humans are presented as acting out of concern for the good of others. They show respect for justice and act from altruistic motivation, and this is one source of value ...


Ethical Method In Aristotle: Setting Out The Phainomena, Daniel T. Devereux Dec 1987

Ethical Method In Aristotle: Setting Out The Phainomena, Daniel T. Devereux

The Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy Newsletter

My chief objective here is the task of setting out and clarifying the data that we need to consider in giving an account of Aristotle's method in ethics. These data are more complex than is usually supposed. I argue that it may be quite misleading to speak of the method of endoxa as the dialectical method, and that it is a mistake to think that there are close parallels between this method and the concept of dialectic discussed in the Topics.


Aristotle's Demarcation Of The Senses Of Energeia In Metaphysics Ix,6, Ronald Polansky Dec 1982

Aristotle's Demarcation Of The Senses Of Energeia In Metaphysics Ix,6, Ronald Polansky

The Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy Newsletter

Aristotle demarcates in Metaphysics IX.6 three most crucial senses of energeia. There is that which pertains to categorial being, and that which pertains to becoming. Finally, there is energeia involved in the cognitive and affective lives of animals.


Socrates And Thrasymachus, Francis Sparshott Dec 1963

Socrates And Thrasymachus, Francis Sparshott

The Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy Newsletter

What is striking in the Republic is less the doctrines that Plato propounds than the relationship that he develops between ideas. We show that a surprising number of these relationships are already set forth, or alluded to, in the encounter between Socrates and Thrasymachus.


The Unity Of The Laches, Michael J. O'Brien Dec 1962

The Unity Of The Laches, Michael J. O'Brien

The Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy Newsletter

On the level of ideas the dialogue remains incomplete. A satisfactory conception of courage is never formulated. On the level of personalities, however, there is a solution, in the person of Socrates. He has fought bravely at Delium and has matched or surpassed Laches in steadfastness. But he can also examine courage rationally and realizes the importance of knowledge to virtue, like Nicias. Neither Laches nor Nicias is fully worthy as a person of courage, as Socrates is. But there is a harmony between the incomplete definitions they offer and their own characters. The unity of the Laches is both ...