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Full-Text Articles in Philosophy

Prior Analytics And Aristotle's Commitment To Logos, George Boger Dec 1996

Prior Analytics And Aristotle's Commitment To Logos, George Boger

The Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy Newsletter

Prior Analytics describes a natural deduction system as part of an underlying logic. It is a proof-theoretic treatise concerned principally to establish and to perfect a deduction system for science. Aristotle knew that deductions about matters pertaining to a given subject matter are content specific and that they employ a topic neutral deduction system; such a system makes evident that given sentences logically follow from other given sentences. One process of deduction is accomplished through taking pairs of given categorical sentences to generate immediate inferences according to prescribed rules, which categorical inferences are then added to the given sentences and ...


Aristotle's Account Of The Virtue Of Courage In Nicomachean Ethics Iii.6-9, Howard J. Curzer Dec 1996

Aristotle's Account Of The Virtue Of Courage In Nicomachean Ethics Iii.6-9, Howard J. Curzer

The Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy Newsletter

Aristotle's account of courage exhibits several general principles of his architectonic. First, Aristotle applies to courage what I have called the doctrine of disjoint spheres. (1) Each virtue has its own sphere completely separate from the spheres of all other virtues. Aristotle then goes on to narrow the sphere of courage by insisting correctly that courage governs only situations involving both fear and confidence. Aristotle does not make the mistake of further restricting courage to life-threatening situations. Like his accounts of other virtues, Aristotle's account of courage involves several different parameters. (2) Each virtue is a disposition for ...


On Using The Past In Sextus Empiricus: The Case Of Democritus, Emidio Spinelli Dec 1996

On Using The Past In Sextus Empiricus: The Case Of Democritus, Emidio Spinelli

The Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy Newsletter

If we draw the conclusions from a quick reconstruction of the presence of Democritean doxai in Sextus, we could underline that he seems to use them with the precise (and often explicit) intention of reaching at least two purposes, both functional to the attitude he constantly shows vis-à-vis philosophic past. These purposes are — it seems to me — the following:

a. the first one, that of taking advantage of D.'s doctrines as an integrating part of the diaphoniai that he builds (or that he inherits from the Pyrrhonian tradition which preceded him), always presenting D. as a Dogmatist among other ...


Cicero, On Invention 1.51-77: Hypothetical Syllogistic And The Early Peripatetics, William W. Fortenbaugh Dec 1996

Cicero, On Invention 1.51-77: Hypothetical Syllogistic And The Early Peripatetics, William W. Fortenbaugh

The Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy Newsletter

In the course of this paper, I shall say some things about Cicero’s discussion of induction, but my primary concern will be with his account of deduction. In particular, I want to call attention to Cicero’s argument for a quinquepartite analysis of deductive reasoning (Ded. 3). It is remarkable in that it makes elaborate use of the mixed hypothetical syllogism, and also of some importance in that it supplements our evidence for early Peripatetic interest in syllogisms of this land. Recent scholarship on the history of ancient logic has generally focused on later sources—like Alexander of Aphrodisias ...


Impulse And Animal Action In Stoic Psychology, John A. Stevens Dec 1996

Impulse And Animal Action In Stoic Psychology, John A. Stevens

The Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy Newsletter

Even in orthodox Chrysippan epistemology, the Stoics believed that impulse can precede assent. Their doctrines on the propatheiai form a theory of temptation, in which impressions exert a force upon us to assent, just as the Academic critics of the Stoics argued. Close readings of De Fato 40-43 and Stobaeus do not actually bear out the consensus understanding of modern critics like Inwood that impulse is identical with, and can only occur with assent. Stevens collects more evidence and sets out the argument with greater clarity in his published version "Preliminary Impulse in Stoic Psychology", Ancient Philosophy 20.1 (2000 ...


Sagp Newsletter 1996-97.2 November, Anthony Preus Nov 1996

Sagp Newsletter 1996-97.2 November, Anthony Preus

The Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy Newsletter

Announcement of the SAGP Panels with the Eastern Division of the American Philosophical Association and with the American Philological Association for December 1996.


Aristotle And Chrysippus On The Physiology Of Human Action, Priscilla Sakezles Apr 1996

Aristotle And Chrysippus On The Physiology Of Human Action, Priscilla Sakezles

The Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy Newsletter

The early Stoics do not seem to have physiological theories about the workings of the human body. This is not surprising in light of Chrysippus' admission, reported by Galen, of his ignorance of anatomy. Yet a physiological theory explaining the mechanics of how the body moves in response to the soul's desires can be reconstructed from a handful of neglected fragments. Interestingly, the revealed theory is nearly identical to Aristotle's explanation in On the Motion of Animals of "how the soul moves the body in voluntary motion" (700bl0 and 703b3). In this paper I reconstruct the Stoic theory ...


Sagp Newsletter 1995-96.4 April, Anthony Preus Apr 1996

Sagp Newsletter 1995-96.4 April, Anthony Preus

The Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy Newsletter

Announcement of the SAGP panel with the Central Division of the American Philosophical Association in Chicago April 26, 1996.


Aristotle On Civic Friendship, Robert Mayhew Apr 1996

Aristotle On Civic Friendship, Robert Mayhew

The Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy Newsletter

Aristotle offers us no sustained account of civic friendship (πολιτική φιλία), only remarks scattered throughout the Nicomachean Ethics and Eudemian Ethics. In this paper I hope to make clear what his views on civic friendship are.

Citizens will feel affection for one another due to the mutual benefit they receive from living together in a city. They agree about what is advantageous for the city: who should rule, how the city should be run, etc.; and to the extent that they care about the common good, they all have one aim. In addition, the affection a citizen feels for his ...


Sagp Newsletter 1995-96.3 March, Anthony Preus Mar 1996

Sagp Newsletter 1995-96.3 March, Anthony Preus

The Society for Ancient Greek Philosophy Newsletter

Announcement of the panel of SAGP with the Pacific Division of the American Philosophical Association in Seattle, April 4, 1996.