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Articles 1 - 5 of 5

Full-Text Articles in Philosophy

Collecting Birds: The Importance Of Moral Debate, Marc Bekoff, Andrzej Elzanowski Dec 1997

Collecting Birds: The Importance Of Moral Debate, Marc Bekoff, Andrzej Elzanowski

ATTITUDES TOWARD ANIMALS

No abstract provided.


A Framework For Assessing The Rationality Of Judgments In Carcinogenicity Hazard Identification, Douglas J. Crawford-Brown, Kenneth G. Brown Sep 1997

A Framework For Assessing The Rationality Of Judgments In Carcinogenicity Hazard Identification, Douglas J. Crawford-Brown, Kenneth G. Brown

RISK: Health, Safety & Environment (1990-2002)

Arguing that guidelines for identifying carcinogens now lack a philosophically rigorous framework, the authors present an alternative that draws clear attention to the process of reasoning towards judgments of carcinogenicity.


Genetic Testing, Nature, And Trust, Anita L. Allen Jan 1997

Genetic Testing, Nature, And Trust, Anita L. Allen

Faculty Scholarship at Penn Law

No abstract provided.


How Some Risk Frameworks Disenfranchise The Public, Kristin Shrader-Frechette Jan 1997

How Some Risk Frameworks Disenfranchise The Public, Kristin Shrader-Frechette

RISK: Health, Safety & Environment (1990-2002)

The author responds to recent characterizations of her work.


Population Thinking And Tree Thinking In Systematics, Robert O’Hara Dec 1996

Population Thinking And Tree Thinking In Systematics, Robert O’Hara

Robert J. O’Hara

Two new modes of thinking have spread through systematics in the twentieth century. Both have deep historical roots, but they have been widely accepted only during this century. Population thinking overtook the field in the early part of the century, culminating in the full development of population systematics in the 1930s and 1940s, and the subsequent growth of the entire field of population biology. Population thinking rejects the idea that each species has a natural type (as the earlier essentialist view had assumed), and instead sees every species as a varying population of interbreeding individuals. Tree thinking has spread through ...