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Feminist Philosophy

Selected Works

Irigaray

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Full-Text Articles in Philosophy

Irigaray’S Madonna, Julie Kelso May 2015

Irigaray’S Madonna, Julie Kelso

Julie Kelso

In this essay, I argue that Luce Irigaray’s recent, seemingly esoteric readings of the Madonna, actually provide us with a constructive, perhaps even politically progressive, interpretive mode for engaging with the religious texts and figures of our tradition as women. As such, I argue that through her own specific interpretive practice Irigaray provides us with a new image of Mary, and this new Madonna figures the very interrelational interpretive practice that Irigaray believes essential when it comes to our engagements with the (religious) texts of our tradition. Irigaray’s Madonna is an ethical listener, interpreter and exchanger of ‘sacred ...


A Phenomenology Of ‘The Other World’: On Irigaray’S ‘To Paint The Invisible', Helen A. Fielding Dec 2007

A Phenomenology Of ‘The Other World’: On Irigaray’S ‘To Paint The Invisible', Helen A. Fielding

Helen A Fielding


As we know, Merleau-Ponty was struggling with a dynamic shift in his thinking at the premature end of his life.  In those last notes he raises the question of how to elaborate a phenomenology of “’the other world’, as the limit of a phenomenology of the imaginary and the ‘hidden’”—a phenomenology that would open onto an invisible life, community, other and culture (VI, Jan. 1960).  In her essay on “Eye and Mind”, “To Paint the Invisible”, Luce Irigaray shows why Merleau-Ponty was not yet ready to address this question, why he was not yet ready to engage the limits ...


Only Blood Would Be More Red: Irigaray, Merleau-Ponty And The Ethics Of Sexual Difference, Helen A. Fielding Apr 2001

Only Blood Would Be More Red: Irigaray, Merleau-Ponty And The Ethics Of Sexual Difference, Helen A. Fielding

Helen A Fielding

Irigaray turns to Merleau-Ponty's intuitions about the perception of color to develop her own insights into the creative emergence of sexuate identity. As a quality of the flesh, color cannot be reduced to formal codes. The privileging of word and text inherent to Western culture suppresses the coming into being of the embodied subject in his or her own situated context. Color, tied as it is to a corporeal creativity could provide an important link since it facilitates reflection, and a re-enfleshing through color of a differentiated sexuate identity tied to the imagination as well as to genetic identity.