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Full-Text Articles in Philosophy

Transdisciplinarity From Marginal Spaces: Unsettling Epistemic Erasure Of Critical And Decolonial Scholars, Adan Garcia Jan 2019

Transdisciplinarity From Marginal Spaces: Unsettling Epistemic Erasure Of Critical And Decolonial Scholars, Adan Garcia

Undergraduate Honors Theses

I draw on a decolonial imaginary to identify and explore the epistemic erasure of critical and decolonial scholars amidst a contemporary discourse and mainstream historicization of transdisciplinarity as a knowledge paradigm. Using ‘transdisciplinarity’ as a signpost, I trace the dominant narrative and evolution of this epistemological orientation as it has emerged in recent decades in tandem with a contemporary multidisciplinary endorsement for transdisciplinarity. As I track the historical process of epistemic silencing toward critical and decolonial scholars in transdisciplinary discourse, I purposefully center their analytics and conceptualizations to consider the historical mechanisms of knowledge production in academia broadly, which offer ...


The Priority Of Democracy To Education Research, Kevin Murray Jan 2017

The Priority Of Democracy To Education Research, Kevin Murray

School of Education Graduate Theses & Dissertations

This dissertation comprises three independent but related papers (chapters 2-4), framed by an introduction (chapter 1) and a conclusion (chapter 5). The main theme of the work is that democracy should be seen as foundational to – prior to – education research. Drawing on pragmatism and feminist philosophy of science, I make the case that democracy is threaded into the constitutive fabric of good education research and, indeed, of good social science in general. The benefits of democratic values for education research are at once ethical and epistemic. Education research suffers when it is not thoroughly permeated by democratic values. But many ...


The Priority Of Democracy To Education Research, Kevin Murray Jan 2017

The Priority Of Democracy To Education Research, Kevin Murray

School of Education Graduate Theses & Dissertations

This dissertation comprises three independent but related papers (chapters 2-4), framed by an introduction (chapter 1) and a conclusion (chapter 5). The main theme of the work is that democracy should be seen as foundational to – prior to – education research. Drawing on pragmatism and feminist philosophy of science, I make the case that democracy is threaded into the constitutive fabric of good education research and, indeed, of good social science in general. The benefits of democratic values for education research are at once ethical and epistemic. Education research suffers when it is not thoroughly permeated by democratic values. But many ...


The Central Role Of Philosophy In A Study Of Community Dialogues, Michele S. Moses Apr 2015

The Central Role Of Philosophy In A Study Of Community Dialogues, Michele S. Moses

School of Education Faculty Contributions

The project we highlight in this article stems from our philosophical work on moral disagreements that appear to be—and sometimes are—intractable. Deliberative democratic theorists tout the merits of dialogue as an effective way to bridge differences of values and opinion, ideally resulting in agreement, or perhaps more often resulting in greater mutual understanding. Could dialogue mitigate disagreements about a controversial education policy such as affirmative action? Could it foster greater understanding? We conceived of a project that would simultaneously fulfill two goals that we had as philosophers, education researchers, and aspiring public intellectuals. First, it would allow us ...


Liberal‐Democratic Education And The Challenge Of Religion, Jay K. Lynch Jan 2011

Liberal‐Democratic Education And The Challenge Of Religion, Jay K. Lynch

Philosophy Graduate Theses & Dissertations

This work is a response to the mounting criticisms of what I refer to as ‘traditional liberal‐democratic education.’ I defend a characteristically liberal‐democratic approach to education and schooling from recent internal and external challenges. I argue that the traditional liberal‐democratic commitments to common schooling, emancipatory education, and secular instruction are well‐founded and can be acceptably reconciled with the challenges of multiculturalism and religious diversity found in the modern state.

This defense is twofold. First, I defend these principals from recent theoretical reproach leveled on the grounds that they employ an objectionable view of autonomy, fail to ...