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Full-Text Articles in Philosophy

Toward A "Democratic" Vision Of Pedagogy: Hermeneutic Interpretation Through Communicative Discourse In The Humanities Classroom, James Magrini Jul 2010

Toward A "Democratic" Vision Of Pedagogy: Hermeneutic Interpretation Through Communicative Discourse In The Humanities Classroom, James Magrini

Philosophy Scholarship

Philosophers of education writing on teaching for social justice and student empowerment have suggested various theories for enacting a "democratic" learning environment within our schools. Strategies that have been suggested include classroom management stressing student-centered learning, peer-interaction, and the inclusion of diverse learning needs and styles grounded in a pedagogy composed of instructor-student initiated "discourse." Building on "social meliorist," or Social Reconstruction curriculum theory, I attempt to define the notion of authentic "critical pedagogy" through the analysis of classroom instruction in the humanities, and literature in particular. There is the potential for the emergence in praxis of an authentic "democratic ...


Teaching Western Philosophy: An Anti-Authoritarian Approach, James Magrini Apr 2010

Teaching Western Philosophy: An Anti-Authoritarian Approach, James Magrini

Philosophy Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Curriculum Issues: Democratic Education And Knowledge, James Magrini Feb 2010

Curriculum Issues: Democratic Education And Knowledge, James Magrini

Philosophy Scholarship

No abstract provided.


Worlds Apart In The Curriculum: Heidegger, Technology, And The Poietic Attunement Of Art, James Magrini Jan 2010

Worlds Apart In The Curriculum: Heidegger, Technology, And The Poietic Attunement Of Art, James Magrini

Philosophy Scholarship

Margonis (1986) criticizes Heidegger’s philosophy and those who would attempt to adopt his views for the purpose of thinking education because of the "abstract nature of his discussions," which suggest "proposals regarding our political, economic and educational lives from the place of metaphysical argumentation" (p. 125). To the contrary, Dwyer, et al (1988) claim the Heidegger’s philosophy, "clearly suggests an educational theory" (p. 100). This, is perhaps an overly optimistic claim, for it glosses over the difficulty associated with plumbing the depths of Heidegger’s vast corpus in order to speculate on the legitimate potential his philosophy has ...