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Modern Literature Commons

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Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Modern Literature

Barking At Death: Hemingway, Africa, And The Stages Of Dying, James Plath Nov 2011

Barking At Death: Hemingway, Africa, And The Stages Of Dying, James Plath

Scholarship

From amazon.com:Considering the time Hemingway spent not only on the safaris but also in preparing for them beforehand and writing about them afterwards, Africa was a major factor in his life and work. But surprisingly little scholarship has been devoted to this aspect of Hemingway's oeuvre. This book fills that empty niche, opening the way for a long-delayed and multi-faceted conversation on a neglected aspect of Hemingway's work. Topics treated include historical, theoretical, biographical, theological, and literary interpretations of Hemingway's African topics and motifs.


Japanese Jesus: Presenting The Character Of Christ In An Eastern Context, Jessica Schewe May 2011

Japanese Jesus: Presenting The Character Of Christ In An Eastern Context, Jessica Schewe

Honors Program Projects

This Capstone Project looks at the differences between Western and Eastern literature, focusing on the Asian genre of manga, a graphic novel. This project culminates in a Japanese graphic novel entitled Rosalee. It attempts to unite the Western concept of Christianity with the Eastern literary conventions, bridging a gap between un-churched Japan and the truth of the Gospel. The story is designed to inspire readers to read the bible and learn more about Christ.


Inverting The Haiku Moment: Alienation, Objectification, And Mobility In Richard Wright’S ‘Haiku: This Other World’, Thomas Lewis Morgan Jan 2011

Inverting The Haiku Moment: Alienation, Objectification, And Mobility In Richard Wright’S ‘Haiku: This Other World’, Thomas Lewis Morgan

English Faculty Publications

Richard Wright’s haiku — both the 4,000 he wrote at the end of his life and the 817 he selected for inclusion in Haiku: This Other World (1998) — remain something of an enigma in his larger oeuvre; critics variously position them as a continuation of his earlier thematic concerns in a different literary form, an aesthetic departure from the racialized limitations imposed upon his earlier work, or one of several positions in between. Such arguments debate the formal construction as well as the strategic reinvention of Wright’s haiku. The present essay engages both sides of this conversation, arguing ...