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Modern Literature Commons

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Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Modern Literature

From St. Petersburg To Krushchev's Boot, James O. Barnhill, Justin Kerr, Edward Guttman, Caroline Provost, Jennifer Bull, Marguerite White, Nancy Bach, Steve Overman, Josh Pearson, Jean Wasil, Mark Borok, Vivienne Cho, Karen Frishmann, Heather Firth, Lisa Hurwitz, Treva Offutt, Beth Whitney, Sarah Bishop, Richard Ross, Cara Reische, Walter Clarke, Rene Dimanche Jr., David Ross, Malcom Coelho, Andrew Sklar, Michael Wodkowski, Susan Ockerse, Paul Scagnetti, Martha Crawford, Holly Su Heerens Nov 1987

From St. Petersburg To Krushchev's Boot, James O. Barnhill, Justin Kerr, Edward Guttman, Caroline Provost, Jennifer Bull, Marguerite White, Nancy Bach, Steve Overman, Josh Pearson, Jean Wasil, Mark Borok, Vivienne Cho, Karen Frishmann, Heather Firth, Lisa Hurwitz, Treva Offutt, Beth Whitney, Sarah Bishop, Richard Ross, Cara Reische, Walter Clarke, Rene Dimanche Jr., David Ross, Malcom Coelho, Andrew Sklar, Michael Wodkowski, Susan Ockerse, Paul Scagnetti, Martha Crawford, Holly Su Heerens

Programs

Program for the first annual RISD Cabaret held in Memorial Hall. Design and layout by Justin Kerr.


Nabokov's Amphiphorical Gestures , S. E. Sweeney Jan 1987

Nabokov's Amphiphorical Gestures , S. E. Sweeney

Studies in 20th & 21st Century Literature

In addition to using two primary kinds of metaphors (those that clarify descriptions, and those that develop into leitmotifs), Nabokov's fiction demonstrates a third kind that is characterized by extended analogies, baroque, seemingly uncontrolled imagery and rhetoric, and, most importantly, fundamental ambiguity. Although this inherent ambiguity is developed throughout the comparison, it is never resolved. Because of this distinguishing characteristic, I have named such metaphors "amphiphors," after one of Nabokov's own neologisms. Nabokov's comments in Nikolai Gogol and Lectures on Russian Literature, as well as direct allusions to Gogol embedded in a few amphiphors, suggest that this ...


Practicing Nostalgia: Time And Memory In Nabokov's Early Russian Fiction , Philip Sicker Jan 1987

Practicing Nostalgia: Time And Memory In Nabokov's Early Russian Fiction , Philip Sicker

Studies in 20th & 21st Century Literature

Nabokov's earliest Russian fiction reveals his lifelong preoccupation with time and his complex strategies for preserving heightened moments of experience. Dissatisfied with the brevity of involuntary (Proustian) recall, his émigré protagonists strive to inhabit their Russian past more fully through a painstaking process of aesthetic re-creation. Beginning with a handful of vivid recollections, the hero of Mary gradually fabricates a past that is more intensely real than the original. Nabokov's most mature characters, however, recognize the solipsistic danger and utility of living in a vanished mental paradise. Turning to the present, they find unexpected beauty in the arrangement ...