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Modern Literature Commons

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Theses/Dissertations

2006

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Articles 1 - 5 of 5

Full-Text Articles in Modern Literature

A Ruptured Vision: The Symbiotic Relationship Between Literary Modernism And Cinema, Charles Bailey Dec 2006

A Ruptured Vision: The Symbiotic Relationship Between Literary Modernism And Cinema, Charles Bailey

All Theses

ABSTRACT


The study of Modernism has often been divided by a seemingly unbridgeable gap between what has been deemed 'high' art, esoteric works intended for the privileged few, and 'low' culture-works intended for the groveling masses. In the first category are traditional art forms such as painting, sculpture, and literature. The lower art forms include mass-produced works that are accessible by design. Until the latter portion of the previous century the cinema, arguably the most important artistic medium of the twentieth century has been assessed as merely disposable popular culture, an 'other' to the world of traditional 'high' art.
This ...


The Rhetoric Of Crisis: How We Talk About The Vulnerability Of Youth, Casey Cramer Dec 2006

The Rhetoric Of Crisis: How We Talk About The Vulnerability Of Youth, Casey Cramer

Undergraduate Theses and Capstone Projects

The classical definition of rhetoric is generally understood to be the art of persuasion. Originating in ancient Greece, rhetoric was one of the three original liberal arts. It focused on effective use of language, most often in the arena of politics and public discourse (Brummett, 35). By mastering persuasive language, politicians were able to shape and sway public opinion in their favor. Conversely, by understanding the mechanics of rhetoric, citizens were able to recognize and interpret speech that was purposefully constructed. The prevalence of rhetoric in political speech made it an integral part of a democratic society - politicians needed to ...


Handling And Preventing Journalistic Fraud: Janet Cooke, Stephen Glass, Jayson Blair, Kenneth Munson May 2006

Handling And Preventing Journalistic Fraud: Janet Cooke, Stephen Glass, Jayson Blair, Kenneth Munson

Undergraduate Theses and Capstone Projects

Fraud is a growing concern in the news business, especially in recent years where numerous journalism scandals rock its foundation. This paper examines the most prominent cases: Stephen Glass, the reporter for The New Republic newsmagazine who completely or partially fabricated 27 stories in the late ‘90s; Jayson Blair, the New York Times reporter who was found to have plagiarized or made up his supposedly on-thescene reporting in 2003; and Janet Cooke, who won a Pulitzer Prize in 1981 for her Washington Post story about a child heroin addict who, in actuality, did not exist. This paper will examine flaws ...


Stoic , Sharon Koelling Jan 2006

Stoic , Sharon Koelling

Retrospective Theses and Dissertations

Stoic is a non-fiction childhood trauma memoir. The theme of loss is explored through the manuscript as the author delves into the family dynamics prior to a devastating car accident and the stark realities afterward. The mother is left a paraplegic as a result of the accident. The story takes place in the 1960s and early 1970s. This is one family's tragedy as told from a child's point-of-view. Set in a post-WWII suburban community, the comparison of relative prosperity and the loss of normalcy are detailed. The author incorporates both her Norwegian and German heritage as the family ...


A Comparative Investigation Of The Concept Of Nature In The Writings Of Henry M. Morris And Bernard L. Ramm, Andrew M. Mutero Jan 2006

A Comparative Investigation Of The Concept Of Nature In The Writings Of Henry M. Morris And Bernard L. Ramm, Andrew M. Mutero

Dissertations

The study examines two major contrasting theological accounts of nature within the contemporary North American Evangelical community as articulated by Henry Morris and Bernard Ramm. In doing so, the dissertation analyzes nature considered diachronically in three epochs namely: (1) Natura Originalis (the origin of nature); (2) Natura Continua (the contemporary status of nature); and (3) Natura Nova (the future of nature).

The purpose of this research is to discover, describe, analyze, and compare the shape of the two contrasting concepts of nature articulated respectively by Morris, a strict concordist and a special creationist and Ramm, a broad concordist and a ...