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Articles 1 - 4 of 4

Full-Text Articles in Modern Literature

Regretful Ruminations: Jacques Rivière’S L’Allemand: Souvenirs Et Réflexions D'Un Prisonnier De Guerre, Arabella L. Hobbs Jun 2017

Regretful Ruminations: Jacques Rivière’S L’Allemand: Souvenirs Et Réflexions D'Un Prisonnier De Guerre, Arabella L. Hobbs

Studies in 20th & 21st Century Literature

This article examines Jacques Rivière’s post-war work L’Allemand: Souvenirs et réflexions d'un prisonnier de guerre (1918) ‘On German nature: memories and reflections of a prisoner-of-war,’ as a response to the conflicting nexus of Catholicism and French nationalism in the aftermath of the First World War. A damning account of the German race, L’Allemand exposes Rivière’s tussle with his wartime and post-war identities, most strikingly exhibited in his moral distancing from the text he was to eventually publish. In resuscitating Riviere’s now forgotten text, this article engages with the post-war reception of a work whose ...


A Discordant Voice From The Trenches: Juan José De Soiza Reilly’S War Chronicles, María Inés Tato Jun 2017

A Discordant Voice From The Trenches: Juan José De Soiza Reilly’S War Chronicles, María Inés Tato

Studies in 20th & 21st Century Literature

The First World War represented a deep crisis of the European civilization that called into question the values and certitudes of the Belle Époque society. Trenches became the symbol of the dehumanization produced by a conflict that marked a watershed in modern history. As a global conflict, its impact was felt beyond the confines of Europe, involving even neutral countries, puzzled by that unexpected spectacle of violence.

In this new scenery, war correspondents were first-hand witnesses of the horrors of the battlefields, transmitted through their journalistic contributions to a public opinion profoundly shaken by this new kind of warfare. Non-European ...


Robert Zaretsky. A Life Worth Living: Albert Camus And The Quest For Meaning. Cambridge, Mass., And London: The Belknap P Of Harvard Up, 2013. 240 Pp., Melissa M. Ptacek Jan 2015

Robert Zaretsky. A Life Worth Living: Albert Camus And The Quest For Meaning. Cambridge, Mass., And London: The Belknap P Of Harvard Up, 2013. 240 Pp., Melissa M. Ptacek

Studies in 20th & 21st Century Literature

Review of Robert Zaretsky. A Life Worth Living: Albert Camus and the Quest for Meaning. Cambridge, Mass., and London: The Belknap P of Harvard UP, 2013. 240 pp.


Eugene Onegin The Cold War Monument: How Edmund Wilson Quarreled With Vladimir Nabokov, Tim Conley Jan 2014

Eugene Onegin The Cold War Monument: How Edmund Wilson Quarreled With Vladimir Nabokov, Tim Conley

Studies in 20th & 21st Century Literature

The tale of how Edmund Wilson quarreled with Vladimir Nabokov over the latter’s 1964 translation of Eugene Onegin can be instructively read as a politically charged event, specifically a “high culture” allegory of the Cold War. Dissemination of anti-Communist ideals (often in liberal and literary guises) was the mandate of the Congress for Cultural Freedom, whose funding and editorial initiatives included the publication of both pre-Revolution Russian literature and, more notoriously, the journal Encounter (1953-1990), where Nabokov’s fiery “Reply” to Wilson appeared. This essay outlines the propaganda value of the Onegin debate within and to Cold War mythology.