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Modern Literature Commons

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Articles 1 - 7 of 7

Full-Text Articles in Modern Literature

Everyone’S Their Own Worst Critic Or How I Learned Not To Fear The End, Audrey Belle Rosenblith Jan 2016

Everyone’S Their Own Worst Critic Or How I Learned Not To Fear The End, Audrey Belle Rosenblith

Senior Projects Spring 2016

Jean Genet, author ofThe Balcony, and Dante Alighieri, author of Inferno, have more in common than you might think. For one thing, they were both obsessed with death.

The Vestibule (a devised theater piece) was made to examine this obsession with (and fear of) death further.

Art is a tool we can use to confront our fear of death. All people fear death.


Female Visions Of The City: An Exploration Of Urban Literature Written By Women, Leah Katherine Rabinowitz Jan 2016

Female Visions Of The City: An Exploration Of Urban Literature Written By Women, Leah Katherine Rabinowitz

Senior Projects Spring 2016

Senior Project submitted to The Division of Languages and Literature of Bard College.


Reading Playfully: A New Branch Of Criticism For The Digital Age, Enzo Cnop Jan 2016

Reading Playfully: A New Branch Of Criticism For The Digital Age, Enzo Cnop

Senior Projects Spring 2016

This senior project applies the tools of traditional literary analysis to video games. Through this frame, it seek to foster a type of video game literacy amongst its readers. Each chapter corresponds to what it’s author sees as a foundational aspect of literature. The first chapter, ‘Perspective’, puts Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness into contact with The Last of Us (2013), and explores how each work uses medium specific mechanisms to alienate their protagonists. The second chapter, ‘Setting’, surveys the relationship between Thief (1999) and Edgar Allen Poe’s short story, ‘The Fall of the House of Usher ...


Drawing Out The Intangible: A Study Of The Depiction And Reinterpretation Of Memory In Two Comics, Malkie Scarf Jan 2016

Drawing Out The Intangible: A Study Of The Depiction And Reinterpretation Of Memory In Two Comics, Malkie Scarf

Senior Projects Spring 2016

Senior Project submitted to The Division of Languages and Literature of Bard College.

This project is concerned with how we remember, represent, and reinterpret personal history, and it addresses what happens when the intangible stuff of memory and personal experience (lacking any stable visual appearance) are materialized into a visual format – that is, into the medium of comics, comprised of both images and words. Two stand-alone comic books deeply invested in this task of reinterpreting personal memories are at the fore of this analysis: David B.'s Epileptic and David Mazzucchelli's Asterios Polyp.


Beginning In Heidegger, Nietzsche, And Mallarmé, Austen H. Hinkley Jan 2016

Beginning In Heidegger, Nietzsche, And Mallarmé, Austen H. Hinkley

Senior Projects Spring 2016

This project is focused on the theme of beginning. The first chapter is a reading of Martin Heidegger’s Being and Time as an attempt at beginning a new ontology that understands itself as a construct that must be, to quote Heidegger, “critical against itself.” The second chapter is a reading of three of Nietzsche's metaphors as a way of both examining and enacting a beginning. The third chapter is concerned with Mallarmé’s revolution of poetic form in Un coup de Dés, which enacts a new beginning on which the poem reflects through its images and form. Through ...


The Graphic Gregor Samsa: Can Kafka's Creature Be Brought To Life?, Samantha J. Sacks Jan 2016

The Graphic Gregor Samsa: Can Kafka's Creature Be Brought To Life?, Samantha J. Sacks

Senior Projects Spring 2016

Senior Project submitted to The Division of Languages and Literature of Bard College.


Intention In The World Of The Apparatus, João Otávio Rosa Jan 2016

Intention In The World Of The Apparatus, João Otávio Rosa

Senior Projects Spring 2016

My aim is to describe how the technical image, which is at the very core of our culture today, is in fact a technologically aided method of thinking (or imagining) which has outstripped our powers to control it and as a result come to absolutely dominate our lives. Further, through this domination, the technical image has created a type of visual culture that has ensnared us silently. Not only are we, in essence, “non-existing” if we refuse to participate in this global image network but the network and computational visual culture has evolved and become complex to the point we ...