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Modern Literature Commons

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Goodrich Scholarship Faculty Publications

1995

Articles 1 - 3 of 3

Full-Text Articles in Modern Literature

Nadezda Obradovic. African Rhapsody: Short Stories Of The Contemporary African Experience., Pamela J. Olúbùnmi Smith Apr 1995

Nadezda Obradovic. African Rhapsody: Short Stories Of The Contemporary African Experience., Pamela J. Olúbùnmi Smith

Goodrich Scholarship Faculty Publications

African Rhapsody, an anthology containing the work of twenty-five contemporary writers, prides itself on its diversity of topics from sixteen countries of North, South, East, and West Africa. In this fine harvest authentic stories are told by African writers about African characters and the overwhelming realities of their lives in Africa. Where similar anthologies have focused primarily on stories written in English with a few token translations from the French, African Rhapsody gives breadth not only to stories written originally in English but also to translate stories - five from French, three from Arabic, and one Portuguese. The foreword by Chinua ...


In The Ditch, Pamela J. Olúbùnmi Smith Jan 1995

In The Ditch, Pamela J. Olúbùnmi Smith

Goodrich Scholarship Faculty Publications

Originally written as a collection of "observations" and published serially in The New Statesman, In the Ditch, Buchi Emecheta's first novel, is discussed almost always only in relation to Second Class Citizen (1974), its rightful chronological predecessor. Like its companion piece, In the Ditch is heavily autobiographical, following Eme­cheta's own descent into the "ditch" of welfare living and enforced dysfunctionality.


Annie John, By Jamaica Kincaid, Pamela J. Olúbùnmi Smith Jan 1995

Annie John, By Jamaica Kincaid, Pamela J. Olúbùnmi Smith

Goodrich Scholarship Faculty Publications

Annie John, originally published as a series of short stories in The New Yorker magazine, is the story of the title character's childhood and adolescent years in Antigua, West Indies. The novel is divided into eight chapters, each with its own title and internal unity of plot. Set in Antigua, these eloquent and engaging chapters chronicle Annie's confused understanding of the rift between her happy, carefree girlhood years of adulation for her mother and the power struggle and rebellion that mark Annie's transition into adolescence. The tale is told simply, with unrelenting and unapologetic candor, in the ...