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Modern Literature Commons

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Articles 1 - 13 of 13

Full-Text Articles in Modern Literature

The Seven Spices: Pumpkins, Puritans, And Pathogens In Colonial New England, Michael Sharbaugh Nov 2011

The Seven Spices: Pumpkins, Puritans, And Pathogens In Colonial New England, Michael Sharbaugh

Michael D Sharbaugh

Water sources in the United States' New England region are laden with arsenic. Particularly during North America's colonial period--prior to modern filtration processes--arsenic would make it into the colonists' drinking water. In this article, which evokes the biocultural evolution paradigm, it is argued that colonists offset health risks from the contaminant (arsenic poisoning) by ingesting copious amounts of seven spices--cinnamon, cloves, nutmeg, cardamom, allspice, vanilla, and ginger. The inclusion of these spices in fall and winter recipes that hail from New England would therefore explain why many Americans associate them not only with the region, but with Thanksgiving and ...


Beyond Anti-Semitism, Rebecca Gould Nov 2011

Beyond Anti-Semitism, Rebecca Gould

Rebecca Gould

Focusing on internal contradictions within the Israeli left, this essay considers the impact of the historical legacy of anti-Semitism on everyday thinking about Israel and the Palestinian territories. Contesting the view that to criticize Israel is to engage in anti-Semitic defamation, it offers an historical account of how Israel's actions in the West Bank have come to be immunized from conscientious criticism. It also documents how progressive media outlets in contemporary Israel have silenced or otherwise marginalized Israel's most active critics.


Popular Italian Cinema: Culture And Politics In A Postwar Society, Flavia Brizio-Skov Oct 2011

Popular Italian Cinema: Culture And Politics In A Postwar Society, Flavia Brizio-Skov

Flavia Brizio-Skov

With its monsters, vampires and cowboys, Italian popular culture in the postwar period has generally been dismissed as a form of evasion or escapism. Here, four international scholars re-examine and reinterpret the era to show that popular Italian cinema was not only in tune with contemporary political and social trends, it also presaged the turmoil and rebellion of the 1960s and 1970s. Their analysis of peplum (or 'sword and sandal') films, horror films, spaghetti westerns and comedy Italian-style shows how genre cinema reflected the changes wrought by modernization, urbanization, consumerist culture and the sexual revolution. With striking insights into the ...


The Munhak Tongne Phenomenon: The Publication Of Literary Fiction In South Korea Today, Bruce Fulton Jun 2011

The Munhak Tongne Phenomenon: The Publication Of Literary Fiction In South Korea Today, Bruce Fulton

Journal of Global Initiatives: Policy, Pedagogy, Perspective

In this essay I outline some of the profound ways in which the literary culture of South Korea has changed since the mid-1990s, particularly with respect to the publication of literary fiction. I discuss four prominent publishers of literary fiction in South Korea. I argue that among these four publishers, Munhak Tongne has spearheaded a movement toward a more reader-friendly posture among publishers of literary fiction. I suggest in conclusion that Munhak Tongne has established a paradigm for the publication of literary fiction in South Korea in the new millennium.


After The Fall: The Post-Apocalyptic Frontier In The Road And 28 Days Later, Jeffrey J. Lavigne May 2011

After The Fall: The Post-Apocalyptic Frontier In The Road And 28 Days Later, Jeffrey J. Lavigne

UNLV Theses, Dissertations, Professional Papers, and Capstones

Previous scholars have identified three scenes of the American frontier myth: the sea, the west, and space. This evolution of frontiers reflected key changes in the expression of America’s cultural identity. While Janice Hocker Rushing called space “the final frontier,” the prominent place in contemporary society held by zombies and other minions of the occult hint at the emergence of yet another scene of the American mythos: the post apocalypse. In contrast to previous frontiers, which are defined geographically, the post-apocalypse is much broader, for in the wake of a global cataclysm, everywhere is a potential frontier. This decentralization ...


The Pinochet Project: A Nation’S Search For Truth Memory Struggles In Post-Pinochet Chile, Christine Mehta May 2011

The Pinochet Project: A Nation’S Search For Truth Memory Struggles In Post-Pinochet Chile, Christine Mehta

Syracuse University Honors Program Capstone Projects

Chile has fought for 21 years to overcome General Augusto Pinochet’s violent legacy, but moving past the pervasive influence of Pinochet’s 17-year reign is a difficult task, even today. The following work is an investigation on memory, and Chile’s struggle to come to terms with its memory of the dictatorship. The key questions asked are: How do Chileans remember the dictatorship? What does each individual’s memory mean to the collective whole? Why is confronting the past important to Chile’s future?

The investigation is divided into two parts: a journalistic portion in which individual accounts are ...


North American Pollinator Partnership Conference: Public Lands Task Force, Tammy Horn Apr 2011

North American Pollinator Partnership Conference: Public Lands Task Force, Tammy Horn

Tammy Horn

No abstract provided.


North American Pollinator Partnership Conference: Making A Difference One Pollinator At A Time, Tammy Horn Mar 2011

North American Pollinator Partnership Conference: Making A Difference One Pollinator At A Time, Tammy Horn

Tammy Horn

The North American Pollinator Protection Campaign 10th Anniversary conference, held in Washington DC 2010, is the last place I saw myself being invited to a couple of years ago. Unemployed and changing careers, I withdrew from conventional academe to work bees on surface mine sites in Kentucky, which are not conventional places to define new careers.


Narratives Of Nothing In Twentieth-Century Literature, Meghan Christine Vicks Jan 2011

Narratives Of Nothing In Twentieth-Century Literature, Meghan Christine Vicks

Comparative Literature Graduate Theses & Dissertations

This study begins with the observation that much of twentieth-century art, literature, and philosophy exhibits a concern with nothing itself. Both Martin Heidegger and Jean Paul Sartre, for example, perceive that nothing is part-and-parcel of (man’s) being. The present study adopts a similar position concerning nothing and its essential relationship to being, but adds a third element: that of writing narrative. This relationship between nothing and narrative is, I argue, established in the writings of Friedrich Nietzsche, Mikhail Bakhtin, Jacques Derrida, and Julia Kristeva. As Heidegger and Sartre position nothing as essential to the creation of being, so Nietzsche ...


Ferdinand Oyono, Kasongo Mulenda Kapanga Jan 2011

Ferdinand Oyono, Kasongo Mulenda Kapanga

Languages, Literatures, and Cultures Faculty Publications

Ferdinand Oyono was a Cameroonian statesman and a Francophone novelist of the first generation of African writers who became active after World War II. He entered the literary scene at a time when writers such as his fellow Cameroonian Mongo Beti and the Senegalese Sembene Ousmane and Leopold Sedar Senghor were at their peak. Oyono and Mongo Beti are known as "the forefathers of modern African Identity" for their anticolonial novels.


Review Of I'M Right Here By Constance Ørbeck-Nilssen, Shaune Young Jan 2011

Review Of I'M Right Here By Constance Ørbeck-Nilssen, Shaune Young

Library Intern Book Reviews

No abstract provided.


Review Of Miss Peregrine's Home For Peculiar Children By Ransom Riggs, Tesla A. Klinger Jan 2011

Review Of Miss Peregrine's Home For Peculiar Children By Ransom Riggs, Tesla A. Klinger

Library Intern Book Reviews

No abstract provided.


Beeconomy: What Women And Bees Can Teach Us About Local Trade And The Global Market, Tammy Horn Dec 2010

Beeconomy: What Women And Bees Can Teach Us About Local Trade And The Global Market, Tammy Horn

Tammy Horn

Queen bee. Worker bees. Busy as a bee. These phrases have shaped perceptions of women for centuries, but how did these stereotypes begin? Who are the women who keep bees and what can we learn from them? Beeconomy examines the fascinating evolution of the relationship between women and bees around the world. From Africa to Australia to Asia, women have participated in the pragmatic aspects of honey hunting and in the more advanced skills associated with beekeeping as hive technology has advanced through the centuries.

Synthesizing the various aspects of hive-related products, such as beewax and cosmetics, as well as ...