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Modern Literature Commons

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Articles 1 - 5 of 5

Full-Text Articles in Modern Literature

The [Ftaires!] To Remembrance: Language, Memory, And Visual Rhetoric In Chaucer's House Of Fame And Danielewski's House Of Leaves, Shannon Danae Kilgore Aug 2014

The [Ftaires!] To Remembrance: Language, Memory, And Visual Rhetoric In Chaucer's House Of Fame And Danielewski's House Of Leaves, Shannon Danae Kilgore

Honors Program Theses

Geoffrey Chaucer's dream poem The House of Fame explores virtual technologies of memory and reading, which are similar to the themes explored in Danielewski's House of Leaves. "[ftaires!]", apart from referencing the anecdotal (and humorous) misspelling of "stairs" in House of Leaves, is one such linguistically and visually informed phenomenon that speaks directly to how we think about, and give remembrance to, our own digital and textual culture. This paper posits that graphic design, illustrations, and other textual cues (such as the [ftaires!] mispelling in House of Leaves] have a subtle yet powerful psychological influence on our reading ...


"Jesus Thrown Everything Off Balance": Grace And Redemption In Flannery O'Connor's "A Good Man Is Hard To Find", Abbie C. Harris Aug 2014

"Jesus Thrown Everything Off Balance": Grace And Redemption In Flannery O'Connor's "A Good Man Is Hard To Find", Abbie C. Harris

Papers & Publications: Interdisciplinary Journal of Undergraduate Research

By creating flawed, hypocritical, and sometimes mad characters, Flannery O’Connor demonstrates the religious decay of the South in her short story “A Good Man is Hard to Find.” While they appear to be quite different on the surface, Grandma and The Misfit are both the same at the core: sinners in need of Christ’s redemption. The Misfit is blatantly sinful and enraged at the concept of God’s grace, and Grandma masks her sinfulness with respectability and chooses to treat God as something that she can accept or ignore depending on her situation, a common practice of “good ...


Creating A Lexical Universe: Redefining Burke’S Dramatic Pentad Through The Language Of Finnegans Wake, London Chamberlin Aug 2014

Creating A Lexical Universe: Redefining Burke’S Dramatic Pentad Through The Language Of Finnegans Wake, London Chamberlin

Papers & Publications: Interdisciplinary Journal of Undergraduate Research

By applying James Joyce’s Finnegans Wake to Kenneth Burke’s dramatic pentad, I argue that Joyce’s lexical ambiguities, while intentionally caustic, succeed in strengthening rather than discarding typical dramatic structures. Renowned for its perplexities, the Wake revels in its flexible allusions and word play. These “puns and reedles,” as Joyce calls them, serve to distort what readers would generally classify as elements of narrative form, summed up succinctly by Burke’s dramatic pentad: act, scene, agent, agency, and purpose. Nevertheless, I attempt to prove that Joyce’s work emerges rhetorically sound through his authorial motives, motives which expand ...


Comparative Literature: Theory, Method, Application, Steven Tötösy De Zepetnek Mar 2014

Comparative Literature: Theory, Method, Application, Steven Tötösy De Zepetnek

Tötösy de Zepetnek, Steven & Totosy de Zepetnek, Steven

Tötösy de Zepetnek, Steven. Comparative Literature: Theory, Method, Application. Amsterdam: Rodopi, 1998. ISBN 90-420-0534-3 299 pages, bibliography, index. Steven Tötösy de Zepetnek presents a framework of comparative literature based on a contextual (systemic and empirical) approach for the study of culture and literature and applies the framework in audience studies, film and literature, women's literature, translation studies, new media and scholarship in the humanities and in the analyses of English, French, German, Austrian, Hungarian, Romanian, and English-Canadian modern, contemporary, and ethnic minority texts. Copyright release to the author in 2006.


Teaching Australian Literature In A Class About Literatures Of Social Reform, Per Henningsgaard Jan 2014

Teaching Australian Literature In A Class About Literatures Of Social Reform, Per Henningsgaard

English Faculty Publications and Presentations

This article presents an intriguing thesis about proximity and identification, distance and empathy based on the experience of teaching Sally Morgan’s My Place to American university students alongside Upton Sinclair’s The Jungle and Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin in a class examining literature as an agent of social change. Indeed, its response to the question, “How does the Australian production of My Place influence its American reception?” will surprise many people. Students more readily demonstrate empathy with characters and are prepared to ascribe their unenviable life circumstances to social structures that propagate oppression when reading ...