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Modern Literature Commons

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Full-Text Articles in Modern Literature

Stages Of Evil: Occultism In Western Theater And Drama, Robert Lima Jan 2005

Stages Of Evil: Occultism In Western Theater And Drama, Robert Lima

Studies in Romance Languages Series

“The evil that men do” has been chronicled for thousands of years on the European stage, and perhaps nowhere else is human fear of our own evil more detailed than in its personifications in theater. In Stages of Evil, Robert Lima explores the sociohistorical implications of Christian and pagan representations of evil and the theatrical creativity that occultism has engendered. By examining examples of alchemy, astronomy, demonology, exorcism, fairies, vampires, witchcraft, hauntings, and voodoo in prominent plays, Stages of Evil explores American and European perceptions of occultism from medieval times to the modern age.


Science And Imagination In Anglo-American Children's Books, 1760--1855, Sandra Burr Jan 2005

Science And Imagination In Anglo-American Children's Books, 1760--1855, Sandra Burr

Dissertations, Theses, and Masters Projects

Didactic, scientifically oriented children's literature crisscrossed the Atlantic in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, finding wide popularity in Great Britain and the United States; yet the genre has since suffered from a reputation for being dull and pedantic and has been neglected by scholars. Challenging this scholarly devaluation, "Science and Imagination in Anglo-American Children's Books, 1760--1855" argues that didactic, scientifically oriented children's books play upon and encourage the use of the imagination. Three significant Anglo-American children's authors---Thomas Day, Maria Edgeworth, and Nathaniel Hawthorne---infuse their writings with the wonders of science and the clear message that an ...


Introduction: Kämiks, Thomas Keegan Dec 2004

Introduction: Kämiks, Thomas Keegan

Tom Keegan

This essay introduces the articles published in the Iowa Journal of Cultural Studies' "Kämiks" issue and discusses the shared terrain of comics, William Blake, and contemporary film.