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Full-Text Articles in Modern Literature

Of Madness And Machines: Names In Ken Kesey's One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest, William A. Francis Oct 2014

Of Madness And Machines: Names In Ken Kesey's One Flew Over The Cuckoo's Nest, William A. Francis

Literary Onomastics Studies

Included here is the introductory paragraph of the article.

Ken Kesey's first novel, One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, reflects his experiences as a young attendant in two California mental hospitals in which he was employed. Book reviewers spoke highly of One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest, and recognized the authority with which Kesey captured the day-to-day routines and events in mental wards. Irving Malin observed that One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest is a gothic novel, for it employs imprisonment, madness, violence and distorted reflections, but it does so in a new way which Malin ...


Hooray For Hollywood: Onomastic Techniques In Bemelmans' Dirty Eddie, Leonard R.N. Ashley Oct 2014

Hooray For Hollywood: Onomastic Techniques In Bemelmans' Dirty Eddie, Leonard R.N. Ashley

Literary Onomastics Studies

Curs, canine or human, tend to bite the hand that feeds them. Therefore it is not surprising that a lot of satirical barbs have been flung by writers at the dream factories of Hollywood where so many of them have labored. There is a long list of obscure plays about Tinsel Town: Hey Diddle Diddle (Cormack), Schoolhouse on the Lot (Fields and Chodorov), The Greatest Find Since Garbo (Birchard and Bard), On Location (Wiley), Dearly Beloved (Beahan and Buckner), Kiss the Boys Goodbye (Boothe), Hollywood Be Thy Name (Fagan), Stars in Your Eyes (McEvoy), and the list goes on. Some ...


Tom Stoppard And Ferenc Molnar: A Comparison Of Onomastics, Elizabeth M. Rajec Oct 2014

Tom Stoppard And Ferenc Molnar: A Comparison Of Onomastics, Elizabeth M. Rajec

Literary Onomastics Studies

In lieu of an abstract, the introductory paragraph is included here.

Tom Stoppard's hilarious play Rough Crossing was premiered in London in 1984. It had been freely adapted from Ferenc Molnar's classic farce Jatek a kastelyban (literally 'Play at the Castle'). The original play was first produced in Budapest in 1925. Most likely Stoppard's adaptation is based on P. G. Wodehouse's English translation known as The Play's the Thing which premiered in 1926 at the Henry Miller Theatre in New York.