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Articles 1 - 12 of 12

Full-Text Articles in Modern Literature

Mountain/Home: New Translations From Japan, Frank Stewart, Leza Lowitz Jan 2018

Mountain/Home: New Translations From Japan, Frank Stewart, Leza Lowitz

UH Press Book Previews

Mountain/Home presents new translations of Japanese literature from the country’s medieval period to the present. The narrative arc of the selections follows the evolution of Japan’s national self-image. Because Mount Fuji, more than any other national symbol, has represented the soul of Japan, Mountain/Home begins with works inspired by the mountain’s presence. They include excerpts from some of the first literary works in which Mount Fuji appears: the mysterious Tale of the Bamboo Cutter, early court poetry, and the Confessions of Lady Nijо̄, among others. These works are followed by a chapter from Lady ...


Eclectic Modernisms, Or Riding Out The Maelstrom: Global Aesthetic Reflections On Disappointment, Jessica Therese Barg May 2016

Eclectic Modernisms, Or Riding Out The Maelstrom: Global Aesthetic Reflections On Disappointment, Jessica Therese Barg

Theses and Dissertations

In this thesis I interrogate the role of aesthetic modernisms in art and culture, using, as a point de départ, Susan Stanford Friedman’s recent book, Planetary Modernisms. In her book, she lays the ground work for an aesthetic conception of modernisms. She declares the aesthetic experience of modernity is marked by the eclectic recurrence of themes across genres, artistic mediums, or other boundaries, themes which do not always follow one particular system and can be taken from many sources. This essay argues that aesthetic modernisms found in art, when read diachronically, offer a therapeutic perspective on narrativity not only ...


Beginning In Heidegger, Nietzsche, And Mallarmé, Austen H. Hinkley Jan 2016

Beginning In Heidegger, Nietzsche, And Mallarmé, Austen H. Hinkley

Senior Projects Spring 2016

This project is focused on the theme of beginning. The first chapter is a reading of Martin Heidegger’s Being and Time as an attempt at beginning a new ontology that understands itself as a construct that must be, to quote Heidegger, “critical against itself.” The second chapter is a reading of three of Nietzsche's metaphors as a way of both examining and enacting a beginning. The third chapter is concerned with Mallarmé’s revolution of poetic form in Un coup de Dés, which enacts a new beginning on which the poem reflects through its images and form. Through ...


Radical Rejections And Sloppy Seconds, Meaghan Dodson Jan 2015

Radical Rejections And Sloppy Seconds, Meaghan Dodson

English Student Papers

Jane Austen is famous for her heroines and their marriages; at the same time, however, she is also infamous for these same heroines rejecting proposals of marriage. This paper explores how Austen uses the failed marriage proposal to show how women need not fear putting their own happiness first - an idea that is just as radical in our own day and age.


Literature And Science In Nineteenth-Century Realist Novels: A Book Review Article About Ambrière's And Bender's Work, Anne-Marie Reboul Sep 2014

Literature And Science In Nineteenth-Century Realist Novels: A Book Review Article About Ambrière's And Bender's Work, Anne-Marie Reboul

CLCWeb: Comparative Literature and Culture

No abstract provided.


Utopian Literature From The Sixteenth Century To Present Day, Lisa Sikkink Aug 2014

Utopian Literature From The Sixteenth Century To Present Day, Lisa Sikkink

Journal of Undergraduate Research at Minnesota State University, Mankato

Sir Thomas More’s Utopia, Lois Lowry’s The Giver, Ray Bradbury’s Fahrenheit 451, Aldous Huxley’s Brave New World, Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s Herland, Yevgeny Zamyatin’s We, and George Orwell’s 1984 are all works of utopian literature. Although they were written during different time periods, the issues they explore are remarkably similar. My research project explores such ideas as literature, sex and reproduction, society, and family life in these utopian works in order to demonstrate these affinities.


Who We Are: Incarcerated Students And The New Prison Literature, 1995-2010, Reilly Hannah N. Lorastein May 2013

Who We Are: Incarcerated Students And The New Prison Literature, 1995-2010, Reilly Hannah N. Lorastein

Honors Projects

This project focuses on American prison writings from the late 1990s to the 2000s. Much has been written about American prison intellectuals such as Malcolm X, George Jackson, Eldridge Cleaver, and Angela Davis, who wrote as active participants in black and brown freedom movements in the United States. However the new prison literature that has emerged over the past two decades through higher education programs within prisons has received little to no attention. This study provides a more nuanced view of the steadily growing silent population in the United States through close readings of Openline, an inter-disciplinary journal featuring poetry ...


The Journey Narrative: The Trope Of Women's Mobility And Travel In Contemporary Arab Women's Literary Narratives, Banan Al-Daraiseh Aug 2012

The Journey Narrative: The Trope Of Women's Mobility And Travel In Contemporary Arab Women's Literary Narratives, Banan Al-Daraiseh

Theses and Dissertations

This study examines the trope of women's journey and the various kinds of movement and travel it includes employed and represented by three contemporary Arab women literary writers, Ghada Samman, Ahdaf Soueif, and Leila Aboulela in their literary narratives as well as travelogue in the case of Samman. The primary texts analyzed in this study are Samman's Beirut 75 and The Body Is a Traveling Suitcase, Soueif's In the Eye of the Sun, and Aboulela's The Translator and Minaret. These texts demonstrate how the journey trope becomes a fresh narrative strategy used by Arab women writers ...


The Unlovely: Disease, Consumption And Sex In Alasdair Gray's Lanark, Julianne Smith Apr 2012

The Unlovely: Disease, Consumption And Sex In Alasdair Gray's Lanark, Julianne Smith

Honors Projects Overview

LANARK is a novel of splits. Much of Alasdair Gray’s work is occupied by dualism; be itwithin a character, inherent to the narrative, or drawn clearly in his visual art, his work often exists in its opposing balances. Lanark is also complicated by its parts being strewn about within its cover’s confines: Books One and Two are encased by Books Four and Three. The novel in its duality and fragmentation tries, in part, to illustrate what it means to be a Scottish subject in the mid to late twentieth century, both in the harsh and often dull reality ...


Leaving The House Of Memory: Post-Soviet Traces Of Deportation Memory, Rebecca Gould Jan 2012

Leaving The House Of Memory: Post-Soviet Traces Of Deportation Memory, Rebecca Gould

Rebecca Gould

No abstract provided.


An Opposing Self, Christine M. Gamache Jan 2012

An Opposing Self, Christine M. Gamache

Master's Theses, Dissertations, Graduate Research and Major Papers Overview

People have always been both frightened and fascinated by the unknown, and themes touching on the existence of things beyond human understanding have longevity in the literary arena as well as in popular culture. One such theme is that of the doppelgänger, or double, which has been around for centuries but was first made popular by Jean-Paul’s (Johann Paul Friedrich Richter) work Hesperus in 1795. Due to a resurgence in the nineteenth century in the popularity of Gothic literature, doppelgängers, or variations of this double motif, found their way into some of the most famous works of literature by ...


Transgressive Sanctity: The Abrek In Chechen Culture, Rebecca Gould Jan 2007

Transgressive Sanctity: The Abrek In Chechen Culture, Rebecca Gould

Rebecca Gould

The ancient tradition of the abrek (bandit) was developed into a political institution during the second half of the nineteenth and early twentieth century by Chechen and other Muslim peoples of the Caucasus as a strategy for dealing with the overwhelming military force of Russia's imperial army. During the Soviet period, the abrek became a locus for oppositional politics and arguably influenced the representations of violence and anti-colonial resistance during the recent Chechen Wars. This article is one of the first works of English-language scholarship to historicize this institution. It also marks the beginning of a book project entitled ...