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Full-Text Articles in Modern Languages

French In Springfield: A Variationist Analysis Of The Translation Of First-Person Singular Future Actions In The Quebec And French Dubbings Of The Simpsons, Jean-Guy Mboudjeke Jan 2016

French In Springfield: A Variationist Analysis Of The Translation Of First-Person Singular Future Actions In The Quebec And French Dubbings Of The Simpsons, Jean-Guy Mboudjeke

Languages, Literatures and Cultures Publications

This article follows on from Plourde’s work to the extent that it uses the French and Quebec dubbings of The Simpsons as a springboard to address a broader question. However, unlike Plourde’s study, which is only translation studies-oriented, our analysis combines sociolinguistic (variationist), discursive, grammatical, and translation studies approaches. Furthermore, rather than focusing on the adaptation of cultural elements in both dubbings, it looks at one particular linguistic constituent which is omnipresent in all the episodes of its corpus, namely the translation of first-person singular future actions. Building on variationist sociolinguistics, it seeks to uncover the patterns underlying ...


Faith, Languages, Language Learning And Interpreting, Piet Koene Jan 2009

Faith, Languages, Language Learning And Interpreting, Piet Koene

Faculty Tenure Papers

No abstract provided.


Innovation By Translation: Yiddish And Hasidic Hebrew In Literary History, Ken Frieden Jan 2008

Innovation By Translation: Yiddish And Hasidic Hebrew In Literary History, Ken Frieden

Religion

No abstract provided.


The Comedia In Amsterdam, 1609-1621: Rodenburgh's Translation Of Aguilar's La Venganza Honrosa, Matthew D. Stroud Jan 1997

The Comedia In Amsterdam, 1609-1621: Rodenburgh's Translation Of Aguilar's La Venganza Honrosa, Matthew D. Stroud

Modern Languages and Literatures Faculty Research

In the seventeenth century, the Spanish comedia was not only known outside of Spain, it informed other national literatures and was even performed abroad, either in Spanish or in translation. In most cases, it was received into an established cultural environment, such as Corneille's adaptations in France; its appearance was not considered politically inflammatory in any sense as the host cultures were able to deal with the comedia as only a literary phenomenon. In the case of the Low Countries before 1648, however, the comedia was translated and performed in a colony in more or less open rebellion against ...